Education

  • December 6, 2012  

    Currently implemented in 44 U.S. schools, a data-driven dropout prevention program called Diplomas Now targets students who start to fall behind in middle school, and offers them nurturing, mentoring relationships. Ray Suarez reports on how a Baton Rouge middle school was able to turn itself around by adopting this approach. Continue reading

  • December 3, 2012    

    Graphics courtesy of the Center for Time & Learning. Read the full report here. In an experiment aimed to raise achievement in America’s public schools, 11 school districts across five states — Colorado, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York and Tennessee — … Continue reading

  • December 3, 2012  

    Some states, including Illinois, have recently adopted new public school curriculum guidelines called the Common Core State Standards. While some teachers feel relief at having clear guidelines, Elizabeth Brackett of WTTW reports from Chicago on a more contentious aspect of the new implementation: student and teacher evaluation. Continue reading

  • November 30, 2012    

    Photo by PBS NewsHour After decades of using different metrics to calculate high school graduation rates, the Department of Education has for the first time released data for most states’ graduation rates under one standardized measurement. The new data highlights … Continue reading

  • November 29, 2012  

    National literacy program Reach Out and Read reaches kids in a place where they are almost guaranteed to visit: the doctor’s office. Special correspondent John Merrow meets a new breed of pediatrician — part doctor, part teacher — who help parents share books with their children to improve and encourage cognitive development. Continue reading

  • November 20, 2012    

    Watch Poor Kids Preview on PBS. See more from FRONTLINE. In Frontline’s latest documentary, Poor Kids, children are all too aware of their family’s financial situation. With one in five children living below the poverty line, Poor Kids explores daily … Continue reading

  • November 20, 2012  

    Natalie Randolph is one of the first women to head a high school football team, but to her students she is more than a coach. At Coolidge High School in Washington, Coach Randolph prioritizes academics by ensuring athletes attend study hall before practice. Jeffrey Brown talks to Randolph about success on and off the field. Continue reading

  • November 15, 2012    

    Football Coach Natalie Randolph is clear: ‘If you don’t go to study hall, you don’t practice. If you don’t practice, you don’t play.’ The nation’s first female high school football head coach inspires her team on and off the field. Continue reading

  • November 14, 2012   BY  

    Coolidge High School in Washington, D.C. is home to one of the first female head coaches in the nation. But Coach Natalie Randolph is also known for prioritizing academics before football. Her game plan is to show her students that football is just "icing on the cake." Education and character are what sets them apart. Continue reading

  • November 13, 2012    

    Watch Poor Kids Preview on PBS. See more from FRONTLINE. Child poverty has reached record levels with over 16 million children affected. 1 in 13 Americans are jobless, and many children are growing up with little hope for their future. … Continue reading