Education

  • March 5, 2014   BY  

    One of the most frequently taken college admission exams in America has just undergone a significant makeover. The College Board, which administers the SAT, announced Wednesday the first major changes to the test since 2005.

    The changes, which will not take effect until 2016, include the removals of mandatory essays, penalties for incorrect answer and obscure vocabulary words. Continue reading

  • March 5, 2014  

    The College Board announced a partial overhaul of the SAT, slated to take effect in the spring of 2016, which will eliminate the mandatory essay, revert to a top score of 1600 and create new fee waivers for lower-income students, among other changes. Judy Woodruff turns to special correspondent for education John Merrow to examine the measures and what they mean for students. Continue reading

  • March 4, 2014  

    In Oakland, not far from Silicon Valley, a small group of teenagers are glued to their computer screens, learning a new language. The Hidden Genius Project is a small non-profit that’s working to teach computer coding to young African-American men and bring them into the high tech sector — one of the few parts of the economy that’s booming and aching for diversity. Aarti Shahani of KQED reports. Continue reading

  • March 3, 2014  

    At Cesar Chavez Academy in East Palo Alto, Calif., 7th graders are learning yoga as a way to cope with the stress of life in a community rife with homelessness, shootings and gang war trauma. By teaching these children to pay close attention to their breathing and movements, Stanford University researchers are hoping they will focus better in school and beyond. Jeffrey Brown reports. Continue reading

  • NEWSHOUR WEEKEND
    March 1, 2014  

    At P.S. 333 on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, students are studying science in their very own rooftop greenhouse — one of 12 built as part of an initiative to put 100 greenhouse labs in New York City schools by 2020. These labs allow students to experiment with hydroponic techniques, and schools donate the extra produce to local charities. Continue reading

  • February 25, 2014  

    Some states now allow students who entered the U.S. illegally as children to pay in-state tuition at public colleges and universities, but they are not eligible for federal financial aid. Jeffrey Brown talks to Carlos Gutierrez of Republicans for Immigration Reform and Henry Munoz of the Democratic National Committee about a private sector effort to help these scholars. Continue reading

  • February 25, 2014   BY  

    Even the scoreboards in high school gyms will have to advertise only healthy foods under new rules announced Tuesday by the Obama administration. Promotion of sugary drinks and junk foods around campuses during the school day will be phased out under the rules, intended to ensure that such marketing is brought in line with health standards that already apply to school foods. Continue reading

  • Money and saving
    February 24, 2014   BY  

    Oklahoma will require all public high school students to show they have a working understanding of 14 areas of personal finance, like banking, loans, taxes, identity theft and investing, before they will be allowed to graduate.

    Continue reading

  • February 20, 2014  

    At Hinkley High School in Aurora, Colo., students, parents and administration are meeting face-to-face to resolve student conflict with conversation. The number of physical altercations has taken a nosedive as this new type of disciplinary action, called “restorative justice,” replaces suspension. Hari Sreenivasan has the story. Continue reading

  • Photo by martemus via Flickr
    February 18, 2014  

    As high school students gear up to take the SAT or ACT as part of the college application process, a new study claims that these standardized test scores don’t predict academic success as well as grade point average. William Hiss, the former dean of admissions at Bates College and lead author of the paper, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss why some institutions have dropped them as requirements. Continue reading