Politics

  • February 15, 1999  

    The NewsHour’s panel of historians look at the impeachment vote and the impact it may have on the presidency and Congress. Continue reading

  • February 12, 1999  

    Following the final vote of the Senate to acquit the president, the lead House manager, Chairman Henry Hyde of Illinois, addressed reporters from his committee’s hearing room. The following is his prepared statement. Continue reading

  • February 12, 1999  

    President Clinton responded to the Senate vote today in the Rose Garden. Earlier in the day the Senate voted to aquit the president on both articles of impeachment. The following is a transcript of his response. Continue reading

  • February 12, 1999  

    Excerpts from the impeachment proceedings and reactions from the House Managers. Continue reading

  • February 12, 1999  

    After five weeks of presentations and testimony, the Senate voted to acquit the president of both articles of impeachment presented by the House. After the trial, four Senate Democrats discuss the votes and the president’s response with Margaret Warner. Continue reading

  • February 12, 1999  

    After five weeks of presentations and testimony, the Senate voted to acquit the president of both articles of impeachment presented by the House. Four Senate Republicans sat down with Jim Lehrer after the trial to discuss their votes and what comes next. Continue reading

  • February 12, 1999  

    Congressional Correspondent Kwame Holman reports on the Senate vote to acquit President Clinton on the articles of impeachment. Continue reading

  • February 11, 1999  

    The Senate continues its deliberations about impeachment behind closed doors. A final vote is expected on Friday. Margaret Warner discusses the state of affairs with Boston Globe columnist Tom Oliphant and David Brooks, senior editor of the Weekly Standard. Continue reading

  • February 11, 1999  

    Congressional Correspondent Kwame Holman reports on the latest developments in the Senate impeachment trial. Continue reading

  • February 10, 1999  

    The Clinton administration has proposed legislation that will require schools to meet tougher standards in order to receive federal funds. Richard Riley, secretary of education, and Rep. William Goodling (R-PA), join Phil Ponce to assess the feasibility of the president’s plan. Continue reading