Politics

Follow PBS NewsHour’s complete coverage of politics, Congress, the Supreme court and the presidency.

  • April 2, 2004   BY  

    The judge in the grand larceny case against two former Tyco International Ltd. executives declared a mistrial Friday, citing outside pressure on a holdout juror. Continue reading

  • April 2, 2004  

    Political analysts Mark Shields and David Brooks discuss the week in the news, including the new job growth numbers, the latest developments in Iraq and the 9/11 commission. Continue reading

  • April 2, 2004  

    The corporate corruption trial of two former Tyco executives ended in a mistrial today after an apparent holdout juror received a threatening letter. Ray Suarez discusses the decision and the future of the case with New York Times reporter Andrew Ross Sorkin and former federal prosecutor Robert Mintz. Continue reading

  • April 2, 2004  

    Both houses of Congress passed different versions of a transportation bill, both of which President Bush says are paved with pork-barrel projects that make them too expensive for him to sign. Kwame Holman explains the election-year politics behind the fight to fund the refurbishment of America’s transportation infrastructure. Continue reading

  • March 31, 2004   BY  

    In a challenge to the dominance of conservative talk radio programs, Air America Radio, the new liberal talk radio network, went on the air Wednesday. Continue reading

  • March 31, 2004   BY  

    The world’s leading oil producing nations announced Wednesday that they would cut production by four percent, a move that is expected to drive up the price of gasoline and fuel the political battle over U.S. energy policy. Continue reading

  • March 31, 2004  

    Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger scored a big win when California voters overwhelmingly approved his $15 billion bond issue in early March, but the budget battle in his cash-strapped state continues. Spencer Michels looks at the challenges that face the freshman governor as he attempts to return California from the red. Continue reading

  • March 30, 2004    

    More than two months after NASA announced it will no longer service the Hubble Space Telescope, scientists and the general public are still hoping the agency will change its mind. Continue reading

  • March 30, 2004  

    President Bush agreed to allow national security adviser Condoleezza Rice to testify publicly before the 9/11 commission. Margaret Warner speaks with New York Times White House correspondent David Sanger about the bipartisan pressure which led the White House to reverse its decision. Continue reading

  • March 30, 2004  

    President Bush agreed Tuesday to allow national security adviser Condoleezza Rice to testify publicly before the 9/11 commission. Two members of the 9/11 commission discuss this about-face. Continue reading