Science

  • July 17, 2012    

    A flame from a Saudi Aramco (the national oil company) oil installation known as ‘Pump 3’ burns brightly during sunset in the Saudi Arabian desert. According to Forbes, Saudi Aramco generates more than $1 billion a day in revenues and … Continue reading

  • July 17, 2012  

    More than half of the country suffered drought in June, and farmers and their crops are taking a hard hit. David Beckmann of Bread for the World and Brian Fuchs of the National Drought Mitigation Center discuss how disappointing corn yields have larger economic consequences for the world’s hungriest people. Continue reading

  • July 17, 2012  

    In Panama, local groups have teamed up with environmental activists to halt the development of huge Canadian copper mines. In collaboration with CBC News in Canada and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, Mellissa Fung reports on the project and the money and land at stake. Continue reading

  • July 16, 2012   BY  

    Washington’s Quileute tribe, thrust into the spotlight by the “Twilight” series,’ has been struggling to reclaim land threatened by floods and sea level rise. Together with KCTS9 and EarthFix, NewsHour visited the tribe to hear their story. Continue reading

  • July 16, 2012    

    Washington’s Quileute tribe, thrust into the spotlight by the “Twilight” series,’ has been in a struggle to reclaim land threatened by floods and sea level rise. Together with KCTS9 and EarthFix, NewsHour visited the tribe to hear their story. Continue reading

  • July 13, 2012    

    Last week, a powerful “derecho” storm hammered the mid-Atlantic region, snuffing out power during the peak of a sweltering heat wave for nearly a week in some homes. Days later, our science correspondent Miles O’Brien traveled to Austin, Tex. to … Continue reading

  • July 13, 2012  

    Miles O’Brien examines power grid reliability in a neighborhood near Austin, Texas that uses “smart grid” technology to track – and control – its energy consumption. Continue reading

  • July 12, 2012    

    University of Oregon archaeologist Dennis Jenkins holds three ancient tools known as Western Stemmed projectiles from the Paisley Caves in Oregon. Photo by Jim Barlow. It was long thought that the Clovis people were the first North American human settlers, … Continue reading

  • July 12, 2012    

    From a gigantic rainbow serpent fashioned out of recycled jerry cans to a painting of girls dancing against a Milky Way backdrop, the exhibit “African Cosmos: Stellar Arts” examines how African artists through time have looked to the sky, the … Continue reading

  • July 12, 2012   BY  

    From a gigantic rainbow serpent fashioned out of recycled jerry cans to a painting of girls dancing against a Milky Way backdrop, the Smithsonian’s “African Cosmos: Stellar Arts” exhibit examines how African artists through time have looked to the sky, the sun, the moon and the stars for inspiration. Continue reading