Science

  • May 3, 2012    

    Think you understand climate science better than the average American teen? On the PBS NewsHour this week we’ve been focusing on how climate change is taught in the classroom. But you can test your knowledge with this climate quiz:

  • May 3, 2012  

    With the space shuttle era now over and U.S. space flight on the verge of going private for the near future, the company behind the so-called SpaceX project has ambitious plans to make space flight cheaper for cargo and for humans, with a bold idea to send millions of people to Mars. Science correspondent Miles O’Brien reports. Continue reading

  • May 2, 2012    

    Computer simulation shows a star being shredded by the gravity of a massive black hole and ejecting the debris at high speeds.The blue dot pinpoints the black hole’s location. Credit: NASA, S. Gezari. This video simulates the murder of a … Continue reading

  • May 2, 2012    

    Watch the full segment on teaching climate change from Wednesday’s broadcast above. Post updated 6 p.m. ET May 3. For the first time, national science standards will include guidelines on how to teach climate change kindergarten through 12th grade students … Continue reading

  • May 2, 2012  

    For the first time, new national educational standards for grades K-12 will link global warming trends to manmade emissions. Part of our Coping With Climate Change series, Hari Sreenivasan looks at the challenges teachers face when covering the topic of climate science in their classrooms. Continue reading

  • May 1, 2012    

    This week, the PBS NewsHour will report on one teacher’s struggles to teach climate change in her Colorado classroom. This comes as the National Academies Press is preparing to roll out new national science standards for kindergarten through 12th grade. … Continue reading

  • May 1, 2012    

    Photo of the Onibus Hacker by Bruno Fernandes. There’s a buzz in the streets of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Actually, it’s more of a rumbling sound coming from the turbocharged Mercedes diesel engine on the Onibus Hacker, a coach-turned-activist transport carrying … Continue reading

  • May 1, 2012  

    Dr. Mark Carlson of Nebraska Surgical Research is developing a liquid bandage to stop bleeding quickly and potentially save lives in battlefield situations while also aiding future regenerative possibilities. This report was a collaboration with NET Nebraska and KQED San Francisco’s Quest science program. Continue reading

  • April 30, 2012    

    A team of scientists at Johns Hopkins University are developing self-assembling, three-dimensional nanostructures that can be used for targeted drug delivery. Think devices thick as a human hair that release liquid and micro grippers that grab tiny objects on command. … Continue reading

  • April 26, 2012    

    Is it inherent gender differences, subtle discrimination, the overwhelming “maleness” of the hard science fields? Experts have struggled for years to understand what’s keeping more women from entering physics, engineering and computer science. Judy Woodruff recently posed the question to … Continue reading