Science

  • August 11, 2011    

    Photo by Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County Editor’s note added on Aug. 12 at the end of this post Scientists have pieced together the first-ever fossil of a pregnant plesiosaur, a giant Mesozoic sea reptile from the Cretaceous … Continue reading

  • August 11, 2011    

    Record heat and dry conditions continue to plague large parts of the United States this summer. While the south central region of the United States has been hit especially hard, more than 30 percent of the country is now experiencing … Continue reading

  • August 10, 2011  

    With the popularity of local food on the rise, Washington state farmer Cheryl Ouellette raises pigs to meet the demand. However, small farmers often can’t process their own meat. A mobile slaughterhouse program brings a USDA-licensed facility to farms to benefit farmers, animals and “locavores.” Sabrina Register of KCTS reports. Continue reading

  • August 9, 2011    

    Photo by SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Images That “viral” metaphor for social media just got a little more bona fide. According to a recent slate of independent studies, Twitter can accurately track the spread of a virus or disease — and do … Continue reading

  • August 9, 2011    

    After 16 days of battling fierce mosquito swarms and hauling heavy equipment along a poorly charted river, Nature Conservancy’s M. Sanjayan and a group of young members from the Dene First Nation have completed their 200-mile trek along the Thelon … Continue reading

  • August 8, 2011    

    US swimmer Diana Nyad jumps into the water at Ernest Hemingway Nautical Club in Havana on August 7, beginning her 103-mile journey. Photo by AFP/Getty Images. Update: August 9, 8:50 a.m. ET After 29 hours in the water, shifting winds … Continue reading

  • August 8, 2011    

    Photo by Flickr user Allan Foster. Most of the earth is covered by water, yet more than a third of the global population experiences periodic shortages of the kind used for drinking and agriculture. So why not convert seawater into … Continue reading

  • August 5, 2011    

    For this week’s Science Nation, Miles O’Brien reports on a neuroanatomist who is using real brains to build three-dimensional brain maps. Neuroanatomist Jacopo Annese, director of the brain observatory at University of California, Los Angeles, collects and slices up brains … Continue reading

  • August 5, 2011    

    For the first time in 16 years, NASA is heading back to planet Jupiter to look beyond the planet’s clouds and hopefully get some answers on the earliest days of the solar system. At 12:25 p.m., the four-ton Juno spacecraft … Continue reading

  • August 4, 2011    

    During its warmer seasons, dark fingerlike streaks that look like rivers, streams and small channels appear along the hills and slopes of Mars. The markings are seasonal: They swell during the planet’s warm season and fade as it gets cold, … Continue reading