Science

  • October 21, 2011    

    Infrared lasers that measure droplets and water vapor, sap flow sensors that track the rate that water flows through trees — scientists at the Susquehanna Shale Hills Observatory are using these and other instruments to “understand the water cycle, in … Continue reading

  • October 20, 2011    

    On the NewsHour Thursday, Science correspondent Miles O’Brien looks at the elusive science of earthquake prediction — whether seismologists will ever be able to predict an earthquake with any certainty — and how far they’ve come in Japan come toward … Continue reading

  • October 20, 2011  

    Hundreds of cities on the U.S. West Coast took part in the 2011 Great California ShakeOut earthquake drill on Thursday, just hours before a small tremor hit the San Francisco Bay Area. Science correspondent Miles O’Brien reports from Japan on efforts to predict big quakes before they hit. Continue reading

  • October 18, 2011    

    Update: October 21, 4:30 pm ET| The 2011 Dance Your PhD awards have been announced. The grand prize goes to Joel Miller, a biomedical engineer at the University of Western Australia in Perth. Winners can be found here. In 2008, … Continue reading

  • October 18, 2011  

    After the Obama administration-embraced solar-panel company Solyndra collapsed and defaulted on its government-backed loans, the surging U.S. solar industry is suddenly worried that the subsidies it receives — tax credits and loans guarantees — could dry up in the face of opposition from conservatives. Spencer Michels reports. Continue reading

  • October 17, 2011    

    After it had gone missing for decades in New York state, the nine-spotted ladybug was found in Long Island. Photo by AP/Cornell University, Ellen Woods. Once so ubiquitous it was named New York’s official state insect, the nine-spotted Ladybug has … Continue reading

  • October 14, 2011    

    An estimated 50,000 people have a condition called locked-in syndrome, marked by normal brain cognition paired with paralysis so severe that they often can’t speak. Such conditions can result from an injury or from Lou Gehrig’s disease. Boston University neuroscientist … Continue reading

  • October 13, 2011    

    Illustration of the Black Death from the Toggenburg Bible An international consortium of researchers announced this week that they’ve managed to reconstruct the genome of Black Death — the “great-grandmother” of modern plagues and the same illness that wiped out … Continue reading

  • October 13, 2011    

    The abalone shell before excavation from the 100,000 year old, Middle Stone Age-levels at the Blombos Cave in South Africa. Photo by Science/AAAS. Researchers have unearthed two abalone shells from a South African cave that they believe were used to … Continue reading

  • October 13, 2011  

    Researchers announced Wednesday that they’ve managed to reconstruct the genome of the Black Death, the illness that wiped out around half of Europe’s population in just a few years in the mid-1300s. Ray Suarez discusses the developments with geneticist Hendrick Poinar of McMaster University. Continue reading