World

Find all of the PBS NewsHour’s international reporting and analysis.

  • April 11, 2012  

    North Korea, one of the world’s most secretive and belligerent regimes, is gearing up to launch a missile topped with what it says is a communication satellite. Judy Woodruff and John Isaacs of the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation discuss the regime’s hopes of an image boost and other possible launch outcomes. Continue reading

  • April 11, 2012  

    Part of a partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, special correspondent Steve Sapienza reports from the West African nation of Ivory Coast and explains how committees set up to maintain access to water are helping bring together communities divided along ethnic lines and plagued by the unrest of a civil war. Continue reading

  • April 11, 2012  

    China has tried to clamp down on Internet discussions and move beyond a scandal surrounding the once-powerful political leader Bo Xilai, who was removed from the ruling Communist Party’s Politburo while his wife was named the main suspect in the murder of a British businessman. Margaret Warner reports. Continue reading

  • April 11, 2012  

    China’s ruling Communist Party is trying to contain headlines about the scandal surrounding the once-powerful political leader Bo Xilai. Margaret Warner discusses implications for China and its internal politics with Orville Schell of the Asia Society. Continue reading

  • April 11, 2012  

    In other news Wednesday, a magnitude-8.6 earthquake shook the Indian Ocean off Indonesia’s western coast, but there were no reports of serious damage or injuries. In Syria, the military kept up its assault on rebel-held areas, even as the government vowed to halt fighting before Thursday’s cease-fire deadline. Continue reading

  • April 10, 2012    

    A child prays in a Jericho church in the north of Swaziland. Photos by Alex Gallafent/The World. In the history of the AIDS epidemic in Africa, there has long been a divide between public health advocates and churches. Religious leaders … Continue reading

  • April 10, 2012  

    In other news Tuesday, the Syrian government claimed that its army is pulling back from towns and villages as part of a United Nations-brokered cease-fire plan. However, rebels reported shells were still falling across the country. Also, at least 16 people were killed by suicide bombers in western Afghanistan. Continue reading

  • April 9, 2012  

    In other news Monday, former spy chief Omar Suleiman entered Egypt’s presidential race. He said he’s not looking to “reinvent” Hosni Mubarek’s regime, but is expected to gain support from ruling generals. Also, the U.S. and Afghanistan agreed that Afghan authorities will now have final say over nighttime raids by U.S. troops. Continue reading

  • April 9, 2012  

    Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff’s visit to the White House Monday was staged to stress strong ties between the U.S. and Latin America’s richest country. Rousseff and President Obama touched on issues of cooperation, including education, energy and trade while ignoring areas of disagreement. Margaret Warner reports. Continue reading

  • April 9, 2012  

    In a rare U.S. visit, a collection of 30 Japanese bird-and-flower silk scroll paintings by Ito Jakuchu are on display at the National Gallery of Art, just in time for the National Cherry Blossom Festival in the nation’s capital. Judy Woodruff reports on the display of the 18th century Japanese national treasures. Continue reading