World

Find all of the PBS NewsHour’s international reporting and analysis.

  • April 5, 2012    

    To the Rev. Joseph Serwadda, Uganda’s anti-homosexuality legislation is as much a product of resentment against Western influence and donor interference as it is against the country’s gay population. Serwadda, who leads an alliance of evangelical ministers, believes “gay-ism” is … Continue reading

  • April 5, 2012  

    In other news Thursday, the Taliban mounted new attacks in Afghanistan in a bid to reassert control as gunmen killed at least 10 members of a pro-government militia in the west. Also, the U.S. and Great Britain warned there’s a “high risk” of a terror attack in Nigeria over the Easter holiday. Continue reading

  • April 5, 2012  

    Syrian activists dubbed Thursday’s government assault on the Damascus suburb of Douma as one of the fiercest yet. But regime officials insist troop withdrawals have begun from the provinces of Daraa and Idlib, and peace envoy Kofi Annan said he expects the shooting to stop by April 12. Judy Woodruff updates the crisis. Continue reading

  • April 5, 2012  

    Being gay is extremely taboo in deeply religious Uganda, where one tabloid urged the hanging of people it called the country’s “top homos.” Fred de Sam Lazaro reports how the re-emergence of a bill to impose severe penalties for homosexuality, including death in some cases, has brought more rebuke from Western donor nations. Continue reading

  • April 4, 2012    

    Mention an Internet chat room and certain images spring to mind: over-caffeinated teenage boys trading World of Warcraft tips or fantasy baseball fanatics slinging obscure stats. But for jihadis, chat rooms are the font from which they can receive messages … Continue reading

  • April 4, 2012    

    What’s as easy as lighting up a room — say a hospital delivery room? You’d be surprised. In much of Africa and other poor areas, electricity is scarce and unreliable. Hospitals and clinics in developing countries often use flashlights or … Continue reading

  • April 4, 2012   BY  

    Dr. Laura Stachel and her husband founded We Care Solar to help bring light to the estimated 300,000 hospitals and clinics in the developing world that don’t have reliable sources of electricity. Our slideshow highlights Stachel’s work toward equipping remote clinics with solar suitcases that bring light to dark delivery rooms. Continue reading

  • April 3, 2012  

    In other news Tuesday, Republicans held presidential primaries in Wisconsin, Maryland and Washington, D.C. While Mitt Romney hoped victories would force Rick Santorum to step aside, Santorum insists he’ll stay in the race. Also, the National Weather Service confirmed at least two "extremely dangerous" tornadoes in North Texas. Continue reading

  • April 3, 2012  

    Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood had initially pledged not to field a candidate for president. But last Saturday, the country’s oldest Islamic movement nominated Deputy Chairman Khairat el-Shater to run in the May 23-24 election. Margaret Warner reports on the announcement’s subsequent unease. Continue reading

  • April 3, 2012  

    In Egypt, the Muslim Brotherhood and other conservative Islamic political parties have advanced candidates for the upcoming presidential election. Margaret Warner and Harvard’s Tarek Masoud explore the implications for the political and social life of post-revolution Egypt. Continue reading