World

Find all of the PBS NewsHour’s international reporting and analysis.

  • February 29, 2012    

    Opening day celebration for the Bizung School of Music and Dance in Tamale, Ghana, in 2010. Photo courtesy of Playing for Change. Inspiration started with street musicians. Mark Johnson, a recording studio executive in New York City, was on his … Continue reading

  • February 29, 2012  

    North Korea announced on Wednesday that it will implement a moratorium on long-range missile launches and uranium enrichment at its Yongbyon nuclear facility in exchange for 240,000 metric tons of food aid from the United States. Judy Woodruff reports. Continue reading

  • February 29, 2012  

    Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said North Korea’s agreement to suspend its nuclear program in exchange for U.S. food aid was "a modest first step in the right direction." Judy Woodruff, The Korea Society’s Donald Gregg and Georgetown University’s Balbina Hwang discuss the implications for multinational disarmament talks. Continue reading

  • February 29, 2012  

    In other news Wednesday, at least nine people were killed in the Midwest as an outbreak of tornadoes ripped across the region. More than 30 others were hurt, and a series of small towns suffered heavy damage. In Syria, government troops and tanks pushed into a rebel-held area in the battered city of Homs. Continue reading

  • February 29, 2012  

    Ahead of Sunday’s presidential election, Russia’s Prime Minister Vladimir Putin accused his enemies of planning dirty tricks, including ballot stuffing and even murder, in an attempt to mar the vote’s outcome. Reporting in Moscow, Margaret Warner spoke with Russia’s Alexei Navalny, a leading reformer and anti-corruption blogger. Continue reading

  • February 29, 2012  

    Under pressure from the phone-hacking scandal that engulfed his tabloid News of the World last summer, James Murdoch — the youngest son of Rupert Murdoch — stepped down as executive chairman of News International. Gwen Ifill discusses the ongoing fallout with Ned Temko of The Observer in London. Continue reading

  • February 28, 2012    

    In an effort to clear land for investors and help boost Ethiopia’s economy, the government in the East African nation is relocating farmers from land they’ve used for decades, sometimes against their will. Reporter Cassandra Herrman reports on Tuesday’s NewsHour about how the “villagization” plan is affecting people in one farming community. Continue reading

  • February 28, 2012  

    A controversial resettlement program in Ethiopia is the latest battleground in the global race to secure prized farmland and water. Correspondent Cassandra Herrman reports as part of the Food for 9 Billion series, a NewsHour partnership with the Center for Investigative Reporting, Homelands Productions and Marketplace. Continue reading

  • February 27, 2012    

    Senegal, a West African nation reputed as being one of the continent’s most stable democracies, held presidential elections Sunday despite earlier violent protests by those angry the incumbent is seeking a third term. Continue reading

  • February 27, 2012    

    Protesters, including blogger Alexei Navalny (center), form a human chain in Moscow. Photo by Margaret Warner/PBS NewsHour. MOSCOW | Snow fell steadily all day, large fat flakes and light airy ones, but that didn’t deter the thousands of Russians who … Continue reading