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Second U.S. Soldier Dies From Camp Grenade Attack

BY Admin  March 26, 2003 at 2:19 PM EDT

Air Force Major Gregory Stone, 40, of Boise, Idaho, died early Tuesday at an Army Hospital in Kuwait, a spokesman for the Idaho Air National Guard said Wednesday.

Stone is the second U.S. serviceman to die from the attack on a brigade command tent of the 101st Airborne Division based at Camp Pennsylvania in Kuwait, near the border with Iraq. Captain Christopher Scott Seifert, 27, of Easton, Penn., was also killed in the March 23 attack, while 14 other soldiers were injured.

Stone’s injuries were so severe that he could not be transported safely to a U.S. military medical center in Landstuhl, Germany, Lt. Col. Tim Marsano, spokesman for the Idaho Air National Guard, told the Associated Press.

Sergeant Asan Akbar of Los Angeles, Calif. was taken into custody shortly after the attack, although he has not been formally charged.

On March 25, Akbar was transferred to the Mannheim Confinement Facility in Germany after a judge found probable cause to try him for the grenade assault. The probable cause ruling means that Akbar will remain in jail awaiting a pretrial investigation. It was not clear where or when that would take place, an Army official told the AP.

Army investigators will complete a report and send it to Akbar’s superiors, according to Marc Raimondi, a spokesman for the Army’s Criminal Investigation Division in Virginia. He could not say when the report would be finished.

Before Stone’s death, military experts said Akbar could have faced one charge of intentional murder and additional charges of attempted murder for the wounded soldiers.

Stone is survived by his ex-wife and two sons, ages 11 and 7, who live in Boise.

“He was wonderful, the best son anybody could ask for,” his stepmother, Sally Stone of Riggins, Idaho, said.

His father, Richard Stone of Riggins, Idaho, told a local television station that the last contact with his son was via e-mail on Saturday, one day before the grenade assault. Richard Stone said his son wrote that things were going well and that he was a little nervous, but ready for the mission.

Stone, a 20-year active and reserve veteran of the Air Force, served as the 101st Division’s Air Liaison Officer.