TOPICS > Politics

First Lady, Gov Schwarzenegger to Address Delegates

BY Admin  August 31, 2004 at 1:56 AM EDT

Delegates will hear from First Lady Laura Bush and newly-elected California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who are expected to elaborate upon a moderate, “People of Compassion” theme.

Laura Bush will offer personal memories, insights and examples of her husband’s leadership, according to convention organizers.

The more gentle tone follows a strong and forceful message of Monday night’s speeches given by two politicians who have a strong appeal to swing voters.

Former New York mayor Rudy Giuliani and Arizona Sen. John McCain each highlighted President Bush’s leadership skills after the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001 and defended his aggressive approach to Iraq.

“We need a leader with the experience to make the tough decisions and the resolve to stick with them; a leader who will keep us moving forward even if it is easier to rest,” McCain said of Bush. “He has not wavered, he has not flinched from the hard choices. He will not yield, and neither will we.”

The former mayor criticized Sen. John Kerry as a flip-flop politician.

“This is not a personal criticism of John Kerry. I respect him for his service to our nation. But it is important to see the contrast in approach between the two men,” Giuliani said. “President Bush, a leader who is willing to stick with difficult decisions even as public opinion shifts, and John Kerry, whose record in elected office suggests a man who changes his position often even on important issues.”

Tuesday night’s convention will also feature Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, Education Secretary Rod Paige and Maryland Lt. Gov. Michael Steele, a popular young black politician.

Gov. Schwarzenegger is one of the many politicians speaking at the convention who carries a broad base of support that spans both Republicans and Democrats. But his moderate views on social issues often clash with the conservative base.

Laura Bush will wrap up the night with personal insights. The first lady told NBC’s “Today” show Tuesday morning that she would give her views of President Bush during the most difficult moments of his presidency.

She is expected to send the message that the United States has a bright future and is on the right track.

The first lady is a former schoolteacher and has embraced education as her personal cause during her husband’s term as president.

Outside the convention hall, a New York plainclothes police detective was in stable condition Tuesday after being beaten unconscious during a Monday night demonstration. Police Spokesman Detective Noel Waters said the incident occurred near the end of a demonstration for Poor People’s Economic Human Rights, which began with a rally of several thousand outside the United Nations. Until now, organized protests have drawn hundreds of thousands of people and proceeded mostly without violence.

On Tuesday, protesters called for widespread, nonviolent civil disobedience and some anti-war demonstrators prepared a symbolic “die-in” as close as possible to the site of the convention.