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The Investigation of Flight 93

BY Admin  September 13, 2001 at 2:40 PM EST

However the FBI reports that they have not found any voice data.

The fourth and final commercial jetliner hijacked on Tuesday, was the only one not to hit a major U.S. landmark. The plane was en route to San Francisco from Newark, New Jersey, when it veered off course over northeastern Ohio and headed back southeast toward Pittsburgh.

Federal officials still do not know the exact target of the hijackers, though they suspect the plane may have been aimed for the Camp David presidential retreat or some site in Washington.

Since Flight 93 was the last of four hijacked planes, passengers who made frantic calls to loved ones between 9:30 and 10:10 learned of the World Trade Center crashes earlier in the day.

Mr. Mark Bingham, a 31-year-old who ran a public relations firm, called his mother, Alice Hoglan. Hoglan said her son told her “three guys have taken over the plane and they say they have a bomb.”

Mr. Jeremy Glick called his wife to tell her his plane was hijacked and that all the passengers were herded to the back of the plane. He asked her to call the police. Ms. Glick set up a conference call between her husband and 911 dispatchers during which Jeremy Glick gave all the information he could.

Mr. Thomas Burnett called his wife four times to relay information. She pleaded with him to sit down and not draw attention to himself. She also told him about the World Trade Center attacks in which two other hijacked planes were used as detonators.

Ms. Burnett said her husband told her, “I know we’re all going to die… there’s three of us who are going to do something about it.”

Ms. Burnett and Ms. Glick, in addition to other loved ones of the victims, relate that passengers were planning to “rush” the hijackers. Ms. Burnett said her husband knew they were on a suicide mission and did not want the plane to slam into another landmark.

Officials have not confirmed exactly how or why the plane ultimately flew into the ground in southwestern Pennsylvania.

Investigators have begun mapping out the crash site, searching for any jet parts that could explain why the flight went down. So far, they have found the flight-data recorder and part of one of the Boeings 757 engines. Officials say the largest piece of the debris is only the size of a briefcase.

Pennsylvania police said debris from the crash has shown up about 8 miles away in a residential area where local media quoted some residents as seeing flames in the sky before impact.

Investigators were unwilling to speculate whether the presence of debris in two separate places pointed to an explosion prior to crashing into the ground.

Roland Corvington, the FBI agent overseeing the investigation, said that sorting through the wreckage and piecing together the evidence could take three to five weeks. The Somerset County coroner said that a team of forensic scientists would test DNA evidence to identify the remains of the 45 victims.