Thursday, January 22, 2015

  • Is ‘The Test’ failing American schools?
    As Congress considers revisions to the No Child Left Behind education law, there’s a larger debate about the role and efficacy of using standardized tests as assessment. Anya Kamenetz, author of “The Test: Why Our Schools Are Obsessed With Standardized Testing, But You Don't Have To Be,” joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the evolving role of testing and the “big, unintended consequences.”
    Original Air Date: January 22, 2015
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  • Interactive media helps Obama connect with the country
    In a social media push by the White House, three popular YouTube users were invited to interview President Obama following the State of the Union. Brian Donahue of CRAFT Media/Digital, William Powers of the MIT Media Lab and YouTube entrepreneur Hank Green discuss with Judy Woodruff how social media and platforms like YouTube may affect the reach and effectiveness of the president’s message.
    Original Air Date: January 22, 2015
    President Barack Obama speaks with GloZell Green.
  • The White House made this year’s SOTU a social media affair
    The number of television viewers of the State of the Union address has shrinking, but online, there’s a growing interest. How is the Obama administration tapping into social media to keep the American public engaged? Judy Woodruff speaks with the Kori Schulman, director of online engagement at the White House, about reaching new audiences and the political benefits of speaking with YouTube stars.
    Original Air Date: January 22, 2015
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  • Defeating Islamic State by arms and by argument
    British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond says there are two parts to the mission of defeating the Islamic State: it’s not just a military operation, but also a challenge of stemming the group’s growing appeal. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner interviews Hammond about the flow of foreign fighters and whether the Paris attacks have changed the discussion.
    Original Air Date: January 22, 2015
    TARGETING ISLAMIC STATE monitor
  • In U.S., support for paid family leave but no one to pay
    The United States and Papua New Guinea are the only countries in the world that do not provide any paid time off for new mothers. Why haven’t maternity leave laws kept pace with the increase of working parents? Economics correspondent Paul Solman explores the debate on whether time off for new parents is also good for business.
    Original Air Date: January 22, 2015
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  • Why Yemen’s political implosion is dangerous for the U.S.
    Yemen's government collapsed Thursday as the U.S.-backed President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi and cabinet stepped down, allowing Shiite rebels to effectively take over the capital. Gwen Ifill talks to Gregory Johnsen, author of , "The Last Refuge: Yemen, al-Qaeda, and America's War in Arabia" about the roots of the “slow-motion” collapse and what it means for Western counterterrorism efforts.
    Original Air Date: January 22, 2015
    YEMEN COLLAPSE monitor

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

  • Did the Patriots cheat with underinflated footballs?
    The NFL is investigating the New England Patriots for using underinflated footballs during their final blowout victory game against the Indianapolis Colts before the Super Bowl. Hari Sreenivasan talks to Ben Volin of The Boston Globe about past cheating allegations against the team’s coach and why referees didn’t catch the violation before the game.
    Original Air Date: January 21, 2015
    AFC Championship - Indianapolis Colts v New England Patriots
  • Ebola doctor: ‘Tremendous strides’ in stemming the outbreak
    Dr. Pranav Shetty, global emergency health coordinator for International Medical Corps, was hailed by President Obama in his State of the Union address as an embodiment of the effort to roll back the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. In August, Shetty went to Liberia to help establish and oversee two treatment units and a training center for health workers. He joined Jeffrey Brown for a conversation.
    Original Air Date: January 21, 2015
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  • Housing discrimination case could have broad implications
    A case between a Texas state housing agency and an advocacy organization asks the Supreme Court to decide whether unintentional discrimination over federal tax credits violates the Fair Housing Act. The results could have repercussions beyond both the state of Texas and the housing industry. Marcia Coyle of The National Law Journal helps outline the case with Judy Woodruff.
    Original Air Date: January 21, 2015
    Supreme Court Blocks Virginia Gay Marriages
  • Facing resistance from Capitol Hill, U.S. opens Cuba talks
    The United States and Cuba have commenced talks aimed at normalizing long-strained relations, but support for this turning point is not universal. Gwen Ifill talks to Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News from Havana about opposition from Capitol Hill and the long process of reestablishing the relationship after 53 years.
    Original Air Date: January 21, 2015
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  • What did U.S. mayors hear in Obama’s State of the Union?
    Gridlock in Washington has left much of the heavy lifting of governance to states, cities and towns. What do city leaders think about President Obama's State of the Union proposals? Judy Woodruff asks Mayor Stephen Benjamin of Columbia, South Carolina, and Mayor Richard Berry of Albuquerque, New Mexico what they hope to see materialize.
    Original Air Date: January 21, 2015
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  • Obama takes State of the Union agenda on the road
    A day after giving the State of the Union address, President Obama began a road trip to sell the economic program and other goals he laid out in his speech. While congressional Democrats said they were invigorated by the president’s approach, top Republicans criticized his policies and his pledge to veto bills that could roll back health care and immigration reform.
    Original Air Date: January 21, 2015
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the economy at Boise State University in Boise, Idaho, Jan. 21, 2015. Photo by Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
  • Voices from Iraq: Ahmad Dosky
    The NewsHour recently talked to three Iraqis living in America about the crisis back home. They spoke of their childhoods in Iraq, the U.S. invasion and its aftermath, the sectarian fighting that followed. Ahmad Dosky, 69, was born and raised in Iraqi Kurdistan’s Dohuk City. He arrived in the U.S. in the 70s after fighting against the Iraqi government, and being forced into Iran as a refugee.
    Original Air Date: January 21, 2015
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  • Voices from Iraq: Taif Amer
    The NewsHour recently talked to three Iraqis living in America about the crisis back home. They spoke of their childhoods in Iraq, the U.S. invasion and its aftermath, the sectarian fighting that followed, and this year’s bloodshed by ISIS militants. Taif Amer, 32, is a former translator for the U.S. military in Baghdad.
    Original Air Date: January 21, 2015
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  • Voices from Iraq: Zeena Rahman
    The NewsHour recently talked to three Iraqis living in America about the crisis back home. They spoke of their childhoods in Iraq, the U.S. invasion and its aftermath, the sectarian fighting that followed, and this year’s bloodshed by ISIS militants. Among them, Zeena Rahman, a 30-year-old law associate who left Baghdad in 2003 and now lives in Virginia, helping bring Iraqi refugees to the U.S.
    Original Air Date: January 21, 2015
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Tuesday, January 20, 2015

  • Was Obama’s 2015 address a legacy speech?
    Presidential historian Michael Beschloss and Beverly Gage of Yale University help compare President Obama’s 2015 State of the Union speech to addresses of past presidents who have entered their last years of power, or who faced partisan gridlock.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2015
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  • Shields and Brooks on Obama’s 2015 State of the Union
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff to analyze President Obama’s 2015 State of the Union address, including his agenda of middle class-friendly economic policies. Then political director Domenico Montanaro offers a breakdown of some of the most commonly used words in the speech.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2015
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  • Shields and Brooks on Joni Ernst’s SOTU response
    Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff examine Republican Sen. Joni Ernst’s counter remarks to the State of the Union with syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks. Plus, political director Domenico Montanaro measures the applause factor and political editor Lisa Desjardins gets reaction from inside the capitol from Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen and Rep. Chris Van Hollen.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2015
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  • Obama harkens back to 2004 speech that made him famous
    In his second-to-last State of the Union, President Barack Obama tried to recapture the “unifier” image that made him famous from his 2004 Democratic National Convention speech. The president, though, facing a Congress controlled by the opposition party, will find it difficult to get many of his priorities through in his last two years.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2015
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  • Watch the GOP's response to Obama's 2015 State of the Union
    Iowa Sen. Joni Ernst delivered the GOP response to President Obama’s 2015 State of the Union address, talking about continuing economic challenges for average Americans and how Republicans plan to offer reform. “We heard the message you sent in November — loud and clear,” said Ernst, who also promoted the passage of the Keystone XL pipeline and the repeal of the health reform law.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2015
    U.S. Senator Joni Ernst, who is a Lt. Colonel in the Iowa Army National Guard, will deliver the GOP's response to President Barack Obama's State of the Union address Tuesday. Photo by Jonathan Newton/The Washington Post via Getty Images
  • Watch Obama's full 2015 State of the Union address
    In his 2015 State of the Union address, President Obama appealed to members of Congress to bridge divides to “better reflect America’s hopes.” The president celebrated the country’s economic improvements while urging policies that combat growing inequality, and touched on the fight against the Islamic State, Cuban diplomacy, closing Guantanamo, cybersecurity and climate change.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2015
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  • Obama: U.S. will assist those who oppose 'violent extremism'
    Saying his "first duty as Commander-in-Chief is to defend the United States of America," President Barack Obama told the nation and the world that his country "reserves the right to act unilaterally" to thwart terrorists. He also applauded a thaw in U.S.-Cuba relations, chastised Russia's aggression against the Ukraine and encouraged Congress to pass legislation that improves cybersecurity.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2015
    President Barack Obama laid out his plan for free community college in his State of the Union address.  Photo by Mandel Ngan/Reuters
  • Obama wants U.S. to 'win the race' on science and technology
    In Tuesday's State of the Union address, President Barack Obama promised protecting free and open Internet, as well as creating more opportunities to "win the race" for scientific and technology discoveries that would "unleash new jobs."
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2015
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  • Obama spotlights middle class plight, vows to help
    In Tuesday’s State of the Union address, President Barack Obama celebrated “middle-class economics” and laid out a series of additional proposals to ensure the working class is included in the economic recovery.Most significant among them is his plan to raise taxes and fees for the wealthy in order to give working families a break.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2015
    President Obama highlights "middle-class economics" in his State of the Union speech. Photo by Larry Downing/Reuters
  • Case on judges’ campaign fundraising divides Supreme Court
    The Supreme Court heard a case that could unravel state laws on judicial candidates asking for campaign donations. Marcia Coyle of The National Law Journal joins Judy Woodruff to explain the arguments in the Florida case, take a look at a unanimous decision to allow a prisoner to grow a beard for religious reasons and offer an update on legal action over military burn pits.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2015
    A general view of the U.S. Supreme Court building is seen in Washington
  • Why is the Islamic State targeting Japan for ransom?
    The Islamic State released a video ransom vote that threatened to kill two Japanese hostages unless Tokyo pays $200 million. Jeffrey Brown speaks with former CIA officer Bob Baer about why the militant group is targeting that country.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2015
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  • Connecting the classroom to promising health careers
    Students at Oakland’s Life Academy are getting a head start on health science careers by integrating academics with career-based training and a workplace environment. The high school, which serves low-income and minority students, also has the city’s second highest rate of graduates who go on to college. The NewsHour’s April Brown reports on making the benefits of learning clear to students.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2015
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  • In Aurora, whittling down 7,000 potential jurors to 24
    Jury selection began in the trial of James Holmes, the man charged with killing 12 and wounding 70 at a movie theater in Aurora, Colorado. Holmes has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity. If convicted, he could face the death penalty. Gwen Ifill speaks with Mary MacCarthy of Feature Story News about the monumental task of picking jurors and the suspect’s appearance in court.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2015
    James Holmes and his defense attorney Daniel King sit in court for an advisement hearing at the Arapahoe County Justice Center in Centennial

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