Wednesday, June 18, 2014

  • Debating President Obama’s reach of power
    Facing partisan gridlock, President Obama has bypassed Congress by using executive actions on issues like equal pay, student loans and carbon pollution. But each order faces backlash that the president has overstepped his power. Jeffrey Brown gets debate from Jonathan Turley of The George Washington University and Michael Waldman of the Brennan Center for Justice.
    Original Air Date: June 18, 2014
    Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

  • Revisiting Nixon’s fall in ‘Washington Journal’
    In the 1975 book “Washington Journal: Reporting Watergate and Richard Nixon’s Downfall,” author Elizabeth Drew examined the players and the political upheaval behind Nixon’s fall from power. Now nearing the 40th anniversary of Nixon’s resignation, this classic piece of political journalism is being re-released. Judy Woodruff talks to Drew about the politician at the center of the infamous scandal.
    Original Air Date: June 17, 2014
    washingtonjournal
  • What Iraq’s violent sectarian split means for its neighbors
    The insurgency by Sunni militants in Iraq, known as ISIL or ISIS, adds conflict to an already volatile region. Gwen Ifill talks to Hisham Melhem of Al Arabiya News and Mary-Jane Deeb of the Library of Congress about the failure to stifle ISIL’s growth in Syria, the prospect of U.S. collaboration with Iran and the divergent agendas of Iraq’s other neighboring nations.
    Original Air Date: June 17, 2014
    IRAQ-UNREST-VOLUNTEERS
  • Helping homeless students reach graduation from Skid Row
    Finishing high school can be an uphill battle; for homeless students, it can be like facing a mountain of challenges. The Los Angeles County Unified School District’s Homeless Education Program is designed to provide assistance to students who don’t have a place to live. David Nazar of PBS SoCal reports on efforts to help LA’s homeless youth reach graduation.
    Original Air Date: June 17, 2014
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  • The value and the price of creating a Pacific sanctuary
    President Obama launched a plan to create the world's largest marine preserve by adding to the existing national monument in the Central Pacific. Drilling, fishing and other activities would be off limits. Joshua Reichert of the Pew Charitable Trusts and Juliet Eilperin of The Washington Post join Jeffrey Brown to discuss the impetus and potential opposition for the proposed expansion.
    Original Air Date: June 17, 2014
    Kingman Reef NWR. Photo by Susan White/USFWS
  • Why did it take so long to capture key Benghazi suspect?
    U.S. special forces, with the help of the FBI, apprehended Abu Khattala, one of the suspected ring leaders of the 2012 embassy attack in Benghazi, Libya. Khattala is the first accused perpetrator of the attacks to be taken into U.S. custody. Jeffrey Brown discusses the details of the capture with The Washington Post’s Karen DeYoung, who first broke the story.
    Original Air Date: June 17, 2014
    The U.S. Consulate in Benghazi is seen in flames during a protest by an armed group in this file photo taken September 11, 2012. Photo by Esam Al-Fetori/Reuters

Monday, June 16, 2014

  • Why a victim of attempted murder tried to save his attacker
    If you could face the man who tried to kill you, what would you do? A new book, “The True American: Murder and Mercy in Texas,” tells the story of Raisuddin Bhuiyan, a U.S. immigrant from Bangladesh, who was shot in the face in Texas by a man trying to avenge the 9/11 attacks. Hari Sreenivasan talks to author Anand Giridharadas about Bhuiyan’s campaign to save Mark Stroman from execution.
    Original Air Date: June 16, 2014
    thetrueamerican
  • What’s fueling and funding ISIL?
    The Sunni militants known as ISIL or ISIS continue to broaden their control over the northern Iraq. What are their origins and how does the group compare to other insurgencies? Gwen Ifill learns more from journalist Rania Abouzeid and Brian Fishman of the New America Foundation.
    Original Air Date: June 16, 2014
    MOSUL, IRAQ - JUNE 12:  Militants of Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant damage the patrol car of Iraq army in Mosul, Iraq on 12 June, 2014. (Photo by Onur Coban/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
  • Striking up a jazz conversation to enthrall more listeners
    Jason Moran, one of today's best-known younger jazz musicians, is a true believer that his art form can transport and transform an audience. Newly named the artistic director for jazz at the Kennedy Center in Washington, the musician now has a public platform to share his passion. Chief arts correspondent Jeffrey Brown interviews Moran about his work to bring the jazz experience to more people.
    Original Air Date: June 16, 2014
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  • High hopes for a budding cannabis industry
    Recreational marijuana is legal in Colorado and Washington state, and though it’s still illegal under federal law, more states are considering the move, setting the stage for a potential gold rush that could conceivably rival the repeal of prohibition. Economics correspondent Paul Solman talks to entrepreneurs looking to cash in on the cannabis industry.
    Original Air Date: June 16, 2014
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  • Supreme Court enforces ban on straw purchase of guns
    The Supreme Court ruled that if an individual intends to buy a gun for someone else, he or she must say so. In a separate ruling, the court unanimously supported a challenge to an Ohio law that makes it illegal to lie about a candidate’s position during a campaign. For a closer look at both cases, Jeffrey Brown talks to Marcia Coyle of The National Law Journal.
    Original Air Date: June 16, 2014
    Supreme Court To Rule On Obama Healthcare Law

Sunday, June 15, 2014

  • Insurgent advance spreads in Iraq's northwest
    For more on the deteriorating situation in Iraq, Hari Sreenivasan speaks to Jane Arraf, a reporter for the Christian Science Monitor and Al Jazeera America, who is reporting from the ground in northern Iraq.
    Original Air Date: June 15, 2014
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  • Animals predict World Cup outcomes across the globe
    Animals and World Cup predictions have a storied history. In 2010, an octopus in a German aquarium named Paul became famous after correctly predicting 8 cup matches in a row, outperforming many soccer analysts.
    Original Air Date: June 15, 2014
    Two-year-old African penguin named Aochan, wearing the Japanese soccer team jersey, prepares to make a prediction on the result of Japan's 2014 World Cup soccer match against Ivory Coast at Shinagawa Aqua Stadium aquarium in Tokyo
  • Uganda gays face life in prison under law
    For gays living in Uganda, just walking outside of their homes can be dangerous. And today, long-standing prejudice has been institutionalized into law with the country’s “Anti-Homosexuality Act,” which calls for harsh sentences for gay acts. Offenders convicted of “aggravated homosexuality” face life in prison. NewsHour Weekend special correspondent Martin Seemungal reports from Kampala.
    Original Air Date: June 15, 2014
    Screen shot 2014-06-15 at 12.59.57 PM

Saturday, June 14, 2014

  • Violinmaker uses CT scans, 3D lasers to hone craft
    Based in Brooklyn, New York, Samuel Zygmuntowicz has been crafting stringed instruments for about 30 years, working with musical greats such as Yo-Yo Ma and Joshua Bell. Zygmuntowicz has extensively studied the art of violinmaking and also uses modern tools like CT scans and 3D laser vibration scans to hone his craft.
    Original Air Date: June 14, 2014
    Screen shot 2014-06-14 at 4.37.19 PM
  • Kurdistan remains oasis of calm amid Iraq tumult
    For more on the developing situation in Iraq, Matt Bradley of the Wall Street Journal joins Hari Sreenivasan via Skype from the northern city of Erbil.
    Original Air Date: June 14, 2014
    Screen shot 2014-06-14 at 5.22.16 PM
  • What are America's military options in Iraq?
    The Pentagon confirmed Saturday that an aircraft carrier was sent into the gulf in case the U.S. decides to use force to deal with the latest developments in Iraq. What are America's military options? For more, Janine Davidson, Senior Fellow for Defense Policy at the Council on Foreign Relations joins Hari Sreenivasan in New York.
    Original Air Date: June 14, 2014
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  • Brazil confronts dengue fever fears amid World Cup frenzy
    Teams representing 31 countries have descended on Brazil this week hoping to bring home the World Cup trophy. But amid the excitement, scientists and health specialists are concerned that tourists and players may bring something else home with them: dengue fever, a disease with no immunization and no cure that has long been a problem in Brazil.
    Original Air Date: June 14, 2014
    Screen shot 2014-06-14 at 1.38.08 PM
  • Swordfishing practices under scrutiny on California's coast
    A major clash in California is taking place between environmentalists trying to protect the abundant wildlife off shore and commercial fishers who depend on the ocean's bounty for their livelihood. Recently released images of sea life killed by drift gill-nets have heightened this debate. NewsHour Weekend special correspondent John Carlos Frey reports from California's coast.
    Original Air Date: June 14, 2014
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Friday, June 13, 2014

  • FTC urges more online privacy protection from data brokers
    Companies known as data brokers know a lot about you and the information you share online, including your interests, political preferences, religious affiliations and spending activities. The Federal Trade Commission is now raising questions about the transparency of this industry. Jeffrey Brown interviews FTC chair Edith Ramirez.
    Original Air Date: June 13, 2014
    PROTECTING YOUR PRIVACY monitor
  • Weighing U.S. options as Iraq spirals closer to war
    President Obama said that he will not put U.S. forces on the ground in Iraq, but he is weighing other military options. He also pointed to problems within the Iraqi government and security forces. Judy Woodruff gets views on whether the U.S. should act in Iraq from Zalmay Khalilzad, former U.S. ambassador to Iraq, retired Army Col. Douglas Macgregor and retired Army Col. Peter Mansoor.
    Original Air Date: June 13, 2014
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  • Shields and Brooks on Iraq crisis, Cantor’s defeat
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s top news, including the crisis in Iraq and how the United States should react, as well as House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s primary loss and what that means for both parties.
    Original Air Date: June 13, 2014
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  • Why more American dads are choosing to stay home
    The number of American fathers staying home with their children reached 2.2 million in 2010 -- an all-time high. For a closer look at why more fathers are acting as primary caregivers, Hari Sreenivasan talks to Kim Parker of the Pew Research Center and Scott Coltrane of the University of Oregon.
    Original Air Date: June 13, 2014
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  • Prankster Art
    Is art nonsense? Paul Solman profiles "prankster artists" Alex Melamid and Vitaly Komar to consider the meaning of art around the world from their native Russia to the United States.
    Original Air Date: November 3, 1999
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    November 3, 1999
  • Army Works to Repair Medical Center, Reputation
    Lt. Gen. Kevin Kiley, the Army's surgeon general, and Steve Robinson of Veterans for America discuss the problems with patient care and facilities at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C.
    Original Air Date: February 21, 2007
    Woodruff and guests
  • Pulitzer-winner Vijay Seshadri finds inspiration everywhere
    Bangalore-native, Brooklyn-based poet Vijay Seshadri assiduously collects the details of his life, his world, his ruminations big and small, in the hope that once amassed and ordered they'll connect with readers and arrive at a higher meaning.
    Original Air Date: June 13, 2014
    Brooklyn-based poet Vijay Seshadri is the 2014 winner of the Pulitzer Prize.

Thursday, June 12, 2014

  • How to combat the tightening grip of inequality
    Income inequality has been rising over the past three decades, in the United States most of all, but also in the United Kingdom, Canada and France, according to new findings by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Judy Woodruff talks to Angel Gurria, secretary-general of the OECD, about how inequality depresses economic growth.
    Original Air Date: June 12, 2014
    ECONOMIC DIVIDE WORLD  MONITOR
  • Pew study finds Americans more polarized than ever
    A major study by the Pew Research Center finds the increasing polarization in the U.S. is not just in our politics. American adults are less likely to compromise and often decide where to live, who to marry and who their friends should be based on what they already believe. Michael Dimock of the Pew Research Center and Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report join Gwen Ifill to assess the data.
    Original Air Date: June 12, 2014
    POLARIZED AMERICA  MONITOR

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