Wednesday, September 28, 2016

  • Maureen Dowd on how politics have gone crazy
    Why does the presidential political landscape look like it’s been ripped from the ‘90s? And will Donald Trump inspire more celebrities to run for the highest office? New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd sits down with Gwen Ifill to discuss her new book, "The Year of Voting Dangerously," and what she thinks of politics today.
    Original Air Date: September 28, 2016
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  • Black, female entrepreneurs get creative for funding hurdles
    The fastest growing group of entrepreneurs in the U.S. is African-American women. But minority-owned businesses often face greater challenges getting funding. The NewsHour’s April Brown profiles two women who have bucked the stereotypes and gotten resourceful to launch their ventures.
    Original Air Date: September 28, 2016
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  • How and why we need to get the lead out of our lives
    Our love/hate relationship with lead is as old as history itself. The origin of "plumbing" comes from the Latin word for lead. But only in the 1970s did we realize the consequences of even low doses of the hazardous metal, and by then it was in our pipes, our paint and our fuel. Science correspondent Miles O’Brien examines the lasting health consequences.
    Original Air Date: September 28, 2016
    QUALITY REPEAT A sign is seen next to a water dispenser at North Western high school in Flint, a city struggling with the effects of lead-poisoned drinking water, in Michigan May 4, 2016.  REUTERS/Carlos Barria - RTX2CVJ1
  • Clinton works to win over young voters
    Hillary Clinton sought to monopolize on her momentum from Monday’s debate at a rally in New Hampshire, where Sen. Bernie Sanders joined her to appeal to younger voters and talk about student debt. Meanwhile, Donald Trump rallied his supporters by stepping up his criticisms of Clinton. Gwen Ifill reports on how the race is shifting.
    Original Air Date: September 28, 2016
    U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders take the stage for a campaign event about college affordability at the University of New Hampshire in Durham, New Hampshire, United States September 28, 2016.  REUTERS/Brian Snyder  - RTSPXFC
  • Debating the bill permitting lawsuits against governments
    In a rare show of unity, 97 senators voted to override President Obama’s veto of a bill permitting families of 9/11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia over its alleged support of the hijackers. The president has warned that it could strain relations or spur retaliation. Judy Woodruff gets two perspectives from Jack Quinn, a lawyer representing 9/11 families, and former Attorney General Michael Mukasey.
    Original Air Date: September 28, 2016
    Protesters and family members of 9/11 victims hold placards in front of the White House regarding President Barack Obama's threatened veto of the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act (JASTA) in Washington, U.S., September 20, 2016.   REUTERS/Gary Cameron - RTSOMWL
  • Remembering Shimon Peres, founding father of Israel
    Israel’s Shimon Peres had a political career that extended for nearly five decades. A protege of Israel's very first prime minister, he went from top defense jobs to prime minister, taking a conciliatory approach toward Palestinians that lead to the Oslo Accords and a Nobel Peace Prize. Peres died at 93 years old. William Brangham gets an assessment from Thomas Friedman of The New York Times.
    Original Air Date: September 28, 2016
    Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres signs the peace accord between Israel and the PLO Sept. 13, 1993, while (left to right) Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, U.S. presidential aide John Podesta, U.S. President Bill Clinton and PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat look on. Photo by Gary Hershorn/Reuters

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

  • How do we help struggling, rural, white communities?
    In “Hillbilly Elegy,” J.D. Vance explores life in some of the most geographically secluded parts of the country and the mountain of problems communities there are facing, from economic issues to drug addiction. The subject is a personal one for Vance, who was raised by his grandparents in Appalachia. Judy Woodruff sits down with him to discuss his experience and how these issues came to be.
    Original Air Date: September 27, 2016
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  • How caring for a dying husband made life better
    The best seven months of Tracy Grant’s life were the months she spent caring for her husband with terminal cancer. Suddenly, she says, there were no “bad days.” Petty work mishaps didn’t seem nearly as bad when all she could do was look forward to the little things, like spontaneous laughter or the night sky. Those final months made up the best gift he gave her, Grant says.
    Original Air Date: September 27, 2016
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  • Clinton, Trump regroup after most-watched debate ever
    The day after their first debate, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton returned to the campaign trail to continue the fight. Clinton recounted moments of the debate during a stop in North Carolina, while Trump called in to Fox News to discuss his microphone volume and to criticize moderator Lester Holt. John Yang reports.
    Original Air Date: September 27, 2016
    U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton talks to reporters on her campaign plane in White Plains, New York, United States September 27, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSPORX
  • The facts behind Trump and Clinton’s debate talking points
    Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump debated for 94 minutes in their first public face-off Monday night. During that time, the candidates rattled off accusations, numbers and “he said, she said” quotes. But what was true, what wasn’t and what needed more context? Lisa Desjardins takes a look at the facts behind their claims.
    Original Air Date: September 27, 2016
    U.S. citizens and immigrants who cannot vote watch a TV broadcast of the first presidential debate between U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, in Los Angeles, California, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson - RTSPKW5
  • New documentary gets inside the candidates’ past lives
    “The Choice 2016,” a Frontline documentary, takes an up-close and detailed look at the lives of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. Starting their stories when they were children, producer and director Michael Kirk lays everything out on the table. Judy Woodruff speaks with him about the making of the film and what it reveals about the two people vying for the presidency.
    Original Air Date: September 27, 2016
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  • Strategists weigh in on first-debate takeaways
    To get some post-debate reactions, Judy Woodruff speaks with a political strategists from both sides of the aisle. She talks to chief strategist for the Republican National Committee Sean Spicer and former Obama campaign manager David Plouffe for how the candidates fared.
    Original Air Date: September 27, 2016
    Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speak at their first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. Picture taken September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar - RTSPO7F
  • Boston brings the music back by boosting arts education
    At a time when schools across the country are cutting arts education, this city is aiming to make it universal. Myran Parker-Brass, a classically trained mezzo-soprano who sang for the Boston Symphony, is working to provide weekly arts education to all middle and elementary Boston public school students. And she’s not stopping there. Special correspondent Lisa Stark of Education Week reports.
    Original Air Date: September 27, 2016
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  • Watch the full first presidential debate
    Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump faced off for the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in New York. Watch the full debate, plus analysis from Mark Shields, David Brooks and Amy Walter.
    Original Air Date: September 27, 2016
    Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton discuss a point during their first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Raedle/Pool  - RTSPKCQ

Monday, September 26, 2016

  • South Sudan VP addresses violent clashes, corruption claims
    A recent investigation into corruption among South Sudan’s top leaders alleged that the country’s president, former vice president and military generals have been involved in insider deals. The country’s new vice president, Taban Deng Gai, speaks with Hari Sreenivasan about the investigation, as well as South Sudan’s violent summer, including an attack on U.S. diplomats.
    Original Air Date: September 26, 2016
    South Sudan's Vice President Taban Deng Gai addresses the United Nations General Assembly in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S., September 23, 2016.  REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz - RTSP6HC
  • How the candidates prepared for their first face-off
    Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton will face off for the first time in the election at Hofstra University. The much-anticipated debate comes as the two candidates are neck-to-neck in national polls. Both have been attempting to manage expectations: Clinton calling for the moderator Lester Holt to fact-check and Trump suggesting he will be unfair. John Yang reports.
    Original Air Date: September 26, 2016
    A TV cameraman prepares for the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder - RTSPJ05
  • What Clinton and Trump want from the first debate
    As Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton prepare to take the stage for their first debate, we ask their campaigns about their strategies. Gwen Ifill talks to Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook and Judy Woodruff talks to Trump senior advisor Jack Kingston.
    Original Air Date: September 26, 2016
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  • First debate predictions in an unpredictable election year
    Amy Walter of the The Cook Political Report, syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff for some pre-debate analysis. They discuss what each candidate is hoping to accomplish: for Hillary Clinton it is showcasing her opponent’s temperament and judgement, and for Donald Trump it’s speaking about shaking up the status quo.
    Original Air Date: September 26, 2016
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Sunday, September 25, 2016

  • What to expect from the first presidential debate
    As U.S. presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton prepare for their first debate on Monday night, NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Jeff Greenfield joins Hari Sreenivasan in New York to discuss what to expect.
    Original Air Date: September 25, 2016
    Hostra University students playing the roles of the candidates and moderator go through a rehearsal for the first U.S. presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York September 25, 2016. Left to right are Joseph Burch, Christian Stewart and Caroline Mullen.  REUTERS/Rick Wilking - RTSPCT5
  • Questions remain after Charlotte police release videos
    The attorney representing the family of Keith Scott says videos released Saturday show he was not acting aggressively when police fatally shot him last week in Charlotte, North Carolina. Police Chief Kerr Putney said he released the videos in the interest of transparency. Carla Shedd, an assistant professor of sociology and African-American studies at Columbia University, joins Hari Sreenivasan.
    Original Air Date: September 25, 2016
    Protesters march during another night of protests over the police shooting of Keith Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S. September 24, 2016.  REUTERS/Mike Blake - RTSPAOC
  • This company raised minimum wage to $70,000 -- and it helped business
    In 2015, Gravity Payments CEO Dan Price announced he would raise the company’s minimum wage to $70,000 a year by 2017and slash his own compensation by more than 90 percent. More than a year later, Price reports the company's revenue and clientele has grown substantially, despite critics' predictions that the move would be bad for business. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent John Larson reports.
    Original Air Date: September 25, 2016
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Saturday, September 24, 2016

  • How do police decide when to release video footage?
    In Charlotte, North Carolina, police announced Saturday they would release body cam and dash cam footage from the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. Dozens of U.S. cities have started equipping their police with body cameras, including Charlotte -- but that footage is not always released to the public. National reporter for the Washington Post Wesley Lowery joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss.
    Original Air Date: September 24, 2016
    Marchers protest the police shooting of Keith Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S., September, 24, 2016. REUTERS/Jason Miczek - RTSPA6K
  • North Carolina and Maryland challenge gerrymandering
    Gerrymandering -- the practice of drawing districts to benefit one political party over another or to protect an incumbent -- has a long history in the U.S. Special Correspondent Jeff Greenfield reports on reform efforts in Maryland, where one district has been called a “broken-winged pterodactyl,” and in North Carolina, where litigation is challenging partisan redistricting.
    Original Air Date: September 24, 2016
    An example of gerrymandering in Maryland's 3rd congressional district. Photo by PBS NewsHour Weekend
  • Architect on African American History Museum’s unique exterior
    Architect Philip Freelon talks about how light affects the National Museum of African American History and Culture, which opened on Saturday on the National Mall. While other structures on the Mall are made of marble, granite or concrete, the museum’s unique design means it changes appearance depending on the time of day.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
    The Washington Monument rises behind the National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in Washington September 14, 2016. The museum is holding a media preview today ahead of its opening day on September 24.  REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque - RTSNPZJ

Friday, September 23, 2016

  • Using an ancient Greek tragedy to face trauma in Ferguson​
    In the Greek tragedy “Antigone,” the title character is told that she cannot bury her brother, who has been killed. Echoes of the classical work rang out in 2014, when Michael Brown was shot by police and left dead in the street for hours. New York-based group Outside the Wire presents “Antigone in Ferguson,” a pertinent take on Sophocles that’s encouraging discussion. Jeffrey Brown reports.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
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  • Shields and Brooks on transparency in police shootings
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s news, including police shootings in Charlotte and Tulsa, the newly released video showing the fatal shooting of Keith Scott, the candidates’ views on police violence and recent protests and what we should expect from the first presidential debate.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
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  • FARC holds final summit as an armed rebel group
    On Monday, Colombia will sign a peace accord, ending more than 50 years of war. The deal, if approved by public referendum, ends the insurgency by the guerilla group known as the FARC, which will begin to transition into a political group. Hari Sreenivasan talks to special correspondent Nadja Drost, who has been witness to the FARC’s final conference all week long.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
    Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) commander Ivan Marquez and members of the leadership attend a news conference at the camp where they prepare to ratify a peace deal with the Colombian government, near El Diamante in Yari Plains, Colombia, September 23, 2016.  REUTERS/John Vizcaino - RTSP66T
  • What President Hillary Clinton would do on Day 1
    With the election just six weeks away, we can begin to imagine what the candidates would actually do if they reach the Oval Office. What would Hillary Clinton propose and get done in the first days of her presidency? Lisa Desjardins and Amie Parnes, co-author of “HRC,” join John Yang to discuss Clinton’s proposals for infrastructure and immigration and her plans for the Supreme Court.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
    REFILE-QUALITY REPEATU.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton reads a piece of paper as she flies back to White Plains, after attending a campaign event in Orlando Florida, U.S. September 21, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria - RTSOVCR

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