Tuesday, January 10, 2017

  • Kerry: We’re going to have to fight for substantive dialogue
    Outgoing Secretary of State John Kerry joined other Obama administration officials for an event Tuesday at the U.S. Institute of Peace focusing on the importance of a smooth political transition. Judy Woodruff sat down with him to ask about the Trump transition and the problems the world faces today.
    Original Air Date: January 10, 2017
  • Iran's Rafsanjani played kingmaker, political counterweight
    One of the founders of Iran’s Islamic Revolution died at age 82 on Sunday. Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani helped lead the 1979 uprising and went on to serve both as the powerful speaker of parliament and as the president of Iran in the 1980s. Judy Woodruff speaks with Karim Sadjadpour of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace about his influence.
    Original Air Date: January 10, 2017

Monday, January 9, 2017

  • Conway: ‘No reason to delay hearings’ over nominee paperwork
    As Congress prepares for a packed week of confirmation hearings, Judy Woodruff speaks with Kellyanne Conway, senior advisor to President-elect Trump, about concerns that his nominees are being pushed through without the completion of proper paperwork. They discuss the president-elect’s plans for releasing his tax returns and the choice of his son-in-law Jared Kushner for a top White House role.
    Original Air Date: January 9, 2017
  • How Congress is sidestepping tradition for Trump’s nominees
    Capitol Hill will be buzzing this week as President-elect Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominees answer questions in Senate hearings. But as of last weekend, some nominees hadn’t finished turning in their paperwork or cleared their ethics reviews. Democrats are calling it a rush job and have threatened to slow down the process. Lisa Desjardins sits down with Judy Woodruff for more.
    Original Air Date: January 9, 2017
  • Landmark or footnote? Obamacare legacy now rests with Trump
    When he signed the Affordable Care Act in 2010, President Obama achieved what politicians had long tried and failed to do: provide near-universal health insurance to Americans. But ever since, it’s faced unflagging Republican opposition. Special correspondent Sarah Varney of Kaiser Health News looks at the history and uncertain fate of the ACA.
    Original Air Date: January 9, 2017
  • At refugee camp, kids who escaped Mosul are happy to be free
    A refugee camp just east of Mosul was supposed to be a temporary haven for those fleeing life under the Islamic State. As winter approaches, residents are stuck living in tents under harsh conditions. Special correspondent Marcia Biggs speaks with some of the children who are still happy to be safely away from the horror and finally free to play and learn.
    Original Air Date: January 9, 2017
  • How a morning run can be the first step out of homelessness
    In our NewsHour Shares moment of the day, an organization called Back On My Feet uses running as a catalyst to move people out of homelessness and into jobs.
    Original Air Date: January 9, 2017
  • How Democrats are preparing to challenge Trump nominees
    What should Americans expect from this week of Trump Cabinet confirmation hearings? Judy Woodruff speaks with Susan Page of USA Today and NPR’s Tamara Keith about the forthcoming “information overload,” Democrats’ lack of leverage in opposing nominees, Meryl Streep’s political message at the Golden Globes, plus the stakes and expectations for President Obama’s farewell address.
    Original Air Date: January 9, 2017

Sunday, January 8, 2017

  • Confirmation process set to begin for Trump's cabinet picks
    With Senate confirmation hearings set to begin this week, the independent Office of Government Ethics on Saturday expressed "great concern" that several cabinet nominees have not yet completed an ethics review. The Trump transition team has pushed back on those concerns, saying they “politicize the process.” For more on the hearings, NewsHour's Lisa Desjardins joins Hari Sreenivasan.
    Original Air Date: January 8, 2017
  • Should juveniles be incarcerated with adults?
    While all states can charge juveniles as adults, often for the most serious crimes, North Carolina and New York do so for every 16- or 17-year-old, regardless of the offense. People who want to raise the age of adult responsibility in New York say that research shows a high social and economic cost of incarcerating youth. NewsHour Weekend's Ivette Feliciano reports on the debate.
    Original Air Date: January 8, 2017

Saturday, January 7, 2017

  • Russia’s election intervention is ‘new reality, new weapon’
    n Tuesday, the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence will hold a meeting about the intelligence report released this week that concludes the Russian government tried to influence the U.S. election. To break down what is in the report and what to expect, senior national security reporter at The Wall Street Journal Shane Harris joins Hari Sreenivasan.
    Original Air Date: January 7, 2017
  • Kentucky’s Medicaid expansion under ACA could soon change
    The Affordable Care Act has brought insurance coverage to millions of low-income Americans. But with President-elect Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress vowing to repeal the law, its future is uncertain. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Chris Bury traveled to Kentucky, a state with one of the biggest drops in uninsured residents since the law went into effect.
    Original Air Date: January 7, 2017
    Surgical Tech Melissa Ellis prepares an OR room in the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, Mississippi October 4, 2013. Mississippi is one of at least 20 states that has decided not to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, better known as "Obamacare". REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman

Friday, January 6, 2017

  • Shields and Brooks on Russian hacking, Trump's response
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the U.S. intelligence report on Russian intervention in the presidential election and its implications for American democracy and foreign policy. They also review highlights from the NewsHour’s interviews with Vice President Joe Biden and Secretary of State John Kerry.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2017
  • News Wrap: Congress certifies election of Donald Trump
    In our news wrap Friday, the election of Donald Trump was certified when Congress tallied the Electoral College votes. Vice President Biden presided as a number of House Democrats objected, but none had the support of a senator, which the rules require. Also, Mr. Trump disputed reports that U.S. taxpayers will pay for a wall on the Mexican border, insisting Mexico would reimburse the cost.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2017
  • Kerry: Syria ‘worst human catastrophe since World War II’
    In our most recent interview with a top Obama administration official, Judy Woodruff sits down with Secretary of State John Kerry as the presidential transition nears. They discuss Secretary Kerry's assessment of the U.S.-Russia relationship, now that intelligence has confirmed hacking; the administration’s legacy in Syria and Israel; challenges for his successor, Rex Tillerson and more.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2017
  • Can the seafood industry get Americans to eat local fish?
    Off the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, there’s not much cod left, but there’s plenty of dogfish. It’s a creature most Americans have never heard of, much less consumed. Instead, Americans are eating exported tuna, salmon and shrimp, in a pattern that could wipe out the U.S. fishing industry. NPR News’ Allison Aubrey reports on a company that's promoting seafood caught at home.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2017
  • The failure cycle causing a shortage of black male teachers
    Why are there so few black male teachers? Chris Emdin of Columbia University suggests that a cycle of failure haunts students and their teachers. Students act out, so teachers tighten the rules; more restrictions combined with dull and irrelevant curricula cause students to fail, and teachers quit -- thinking it’s their fault. Emdin raps his Humble Opinion on why the system needs to be changed.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2017
  • What we know about the Fort Lauderdale airport shooting
    At the Fort Lauderdale–Hollywood International Airport in Florida, a gunman killed at least five people and wounded eight others Friday before police captured him. William Brangham speaks with Feature Story News’ Steve Mort, who was at the airport soon after the attack, about what he saw in the immediate aftermath and what we know about the suspect, widely reported to be named Esteban Santiago.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2017
  • Rep. Schiff on the intelligence report about Russian hacking
    Intelligence agencies have released their detailed findings that Russia interfered in the U.S. presidential election. The report says Vladimir Putin himself orchestrated a campaign of intervention, specifically intending to boost Trump's election chances "when possible.” Judy Woodruff talks to Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2017

Thursday, January 5, 2017

  • How gene editing puts us in the driver's seat of evolution
    Imagine you could edit a mouse’s genes to be resistant to Lyme Disease. The mouse would breed and evolution would take its course, leading to the extinction of the disease. That’s the vision for scientists developing CRISPR, technology that allows scientists to rewrite the code of life. William Brangham talks to Michael Specter who wrote about CRISPR for The New Yorker.
    Original Air Date: January 5, 2017
  • News Wrap: Clapper addresses Trump criticism over Russia
    In our news wrap Thursday, the nation’s top intelligence official James Clapper told senators in a hearing he has “very high confidence” that Russia hacked Democratic Party computers in a bid to interfere with the U.S. election. Also, it was widely reported that former Indiana Sen. Dan Coats is the president-elect’s choice to be the next director of National Intelligence.
    Original Air Date: January 5, 2017
  • ‘Hidden Figures’ brings NASA’s black pioneers to light
    “Hidden Figures” is a story about reaching for the stars while fighting racial and gender barriers. The new movie follows the careers of three black women who worked at NASA’s Langley headquarters in Virginia during the 1950s and ‘60s to help launch the first American into space. Long overlooked, their story is finally being told. Jeffrey Brown reports.
    Original Air Date: January 5, 2017
  • Money doesn’t inspire hard work. Here’s what does.
    Bemoaning America’s productivity slowdown, behavioral economist Dan Ariely set out to find what really motivates us. Behavior is driven by emotion, he concluded, not rewards like money; the ability to help other people, feel that we’re useful, feel that we’re getting better or living up to our potential are much stronger motivators than cash. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports.
    Original Air Date: January 5, 2017
  • Biden: Trump belittling U.S. intelligence is 'dangerous’
    As the Obama years come to a close, Vice President Joe Biden sits down with Judy Woodruff to discuss his thoughts on his tenure, the election and the future of the country. They discuss the fate of the Affordable Care Act, evidence of Russian election hacking, President-elect Trump’s critique of the intelligence community, the Obama administration’s legacy in Syria and more.
    Original Air Date: January 5, 2017

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

  • Innovating the next generation of nuclear power
    The next generation of nuclear power is coming, as concerns about climate change bring the industry out of hibernation. Science correspondent Miles O’Brien reports on how new startups and young scientists are hoping to develop solutions for safely generating vast amounts of nuclear energy.
    Original Air Date: January 4, 2017
  • News Wrap: Dylann Roof insists he’s not mentally ill
    In our news wrap Wednesday, the white supremacist who killed nine black churchgoers in Charleston, South Carolina, insisted in court he’s not mentally ill. Dylann Roof is acting as his own lawyer in the death penalty phase of his federal hate crimes trial. Also, in Turkey, authorities say they’ve identified the gunman in a New Year’s Eve nightclub attack that killed 39 people.
    Original Air Date: January 4, 2017
  • Obama, Pence huddle with their parties on health care fate
    At the Capitol, President Obama met privately with Democrats, urging them to defend his signature health care law. At the same time, a few floors up, Vice President-elect Pence rallied Republicans to dismantle Obamacare. Lisa Desjardins reports on what we know so far about the Republican plan for repeal.
    Original Air Date: January 4, 2017
  • Why doesn’t Trump trust the intelligence community?
    President-elect Donald Trump has routinely taken a skeptical stance toward the U.S. intelligence community. As the release nears of a report on alleged Russian hacking in the U.S. election, Judy Woodruff gets views from James Woolsey, senior advisor to the Trump Transition and a former CIA director, and Jeffrey Smith, former general counsel to the CIA.
    Original Air Date: January 4, 2017

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