Tuesday, April 8, 2014

  • Is ‘student-athlete’ a misnomer?
    Players and fans celebrated the March Madness victory by the University of Connecticut, but the game against the University of Kentucky also highlighted one of the major debates facing NCAA basketball. Jeffrey Brown gets perspectives from Patrick Harker, president of the University of Delaware, and Kevin Blackistone of the University of Maryland about student players and the amateurship model.
    Original Air Date: April 8, 2014
    University of Connecticut vs University of Kentucky, 2014 NCAA National Championship
  • Easing the burden for families of long-term caregiving
    For the 42 million Americans who take care of loved ones at home, the responsibilities of care -- once the purview of trained nurses -- have become increasingly complex. AARP has begun to advocate for greater caregiver support through public policy and legislation, but the health care industry may be wary of additional regulation. Special correspondent Kathleen McCleery reports.
    Original Air Date: April 8, 2014
    Home-Care Aides Making $10 an Hour Seen Proliferating U.S. Labor
  • Unprecedented Ebola outbreak crosses borders in West Africa
    More than 100 people have died so far in the worst outbreak of the Ebola virus in years, which began in Guinea before spreading to Liberia. Now health officials are investigating possible cases in Mali and Ghana. Jeffrey Brown talks to Laurie Garrett from the Council on Foreign Relations about past outbreaks and the current challenges for containment.
    Original Air Date: April 8, 2014
    EBOLA OUTBREAK  africa monitor
  • Obama signs executive orders on pay transparency
    President Obama issued two executive orders aimed at income disparity based on gender on what the White House dubbed Equal Pay Day. But Republicans charged the president and Democrats were playing politics rather than improving policy. Judy Woodruff gets two views from Ariane Hegewisch of the Institute for Women's Policy Research and Genevieve Wood of the Heritage Foundation.
    Original Air Date: April 8, 2014
    US-POLITICS-OBAMA
  • De-escalating Eastern Ukraine unrest is delicate challenge
    Ukrainian security forces managed to regain power in Kharkiv, yet pro-Russian demonstrators have held onto control of government buildings in two other cities in the country’s east. Chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the swift pro-Russian escalation and obstacles faced by the Ukrainian government.
    Original Air Date: April 8, 2014
    UKRAINE-RUSSIA-CRISIS-POLITICS-KHARKIV-POLICE

Monday, April 7, 2014

  • What’s devastating the moose population in New England?
    In some regions of northern New England, the moose population is down as much 40 percent in the last three years. The cause of this iconic animal’s dramatic die-off is not yet known, but researchers’ main theory is centered on the parasitic winter tick, and warmer winters may be partly to blame. Hari Sreenivasan reports from New Hampshire.
    Original Air Date: April 7, 2014
    Wild Moose
  • Remembering writer Peter Matthiessen
    Peter Matthiessen was the founder of The Paris Review, an author of more than 30 books, and winner of the National Book Award in both fiction and non-fiction. He succumbed to leukemia at the age of 86, just days before his final novel will be published. In 2008, chief arts correspondent Jeffrey Brown interviewed Matthiessen about his acclaimed work "Shadow Country.”
    Original Air Date: April 7, 2014
    matthiesen
  • Swiss consider welfare overhaul with guaranteed income
    In Switzerland, an idea to guarantee every citizen a yearly income of 30,000 Swiss Francs, regardless of other wealth or employment, has gained enough supporters to trigger a referendum. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports that the idea is gaining some traction across party lines in the United States, too, but views differ on if and how a guaranteed minimum income would work.
    Original Air Date: April 7, 2014
    BASIC INCOME monitor
  • Why Afghans felt their vote mattered in 2014
    Chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner joins Gwen Ifill for a closer look at the historic 2014 presidential election in Afghanistan, including the role of Afghan security forces in keeping polling safe, rumors of voting fraud, whether the United States favors a candidate, as well as what distinguished this election for average citizens.
    Original Air Date: April 7, 2014
    Afghanistan Votes in National Elections
  • Kiev faces ‘critical choice’ in addressing latest protests
    Should the Ukrainian government attempt to move in on pro-Russian protesters who have occupied government buildings in three eastern cities, or do nothing and not risk provoking Russian forces? Judy Woodruff talks to David Herszenhorn of The New York Times in Moscow about Kiev’s options, the probability of another Russian incursion and mixed feelings in Ukraine about keeping it independent.
    Original Air Date: April 7, 2014
    UKRAINE-RUSSIA-CRISIS-POLITICS-DONETSK
  • American Graduate St. Louis: Job Mentoring
    St. Louis's Nine Network looks at how Purina's job mentoring program helps local high schoolers.
    Original Air Date: April 7, 2014
    mentoringstill
  • Steve Scafidi Jr. reads a poem about Abraham Lincoln
    Steve Scafidi Jr. reads his poem "Portraits of Abraham Lincoln with Clouds for a Ceiling" at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C.
    Original Air Date: April 7, 2014
    Steve Scafidi Jr.  reads ‘Portraits of Abraham Lincoln with Clouds for a Ceiling’

Sunday, April 6, 2014

  • What’s the quality of the jobs gained in March?
    NewsHour takes another look tonight at the latest unemployment report. Bloomberg Senior Economist Nela Richardson speaks with Hari Sreenivasan about whether the the jobs counted as recovered of the same quality as those lost in the Great Recession. Richardson says BLS analysis shows that nine of ten jobs gained in March paid less that the of $44,000 per year.
    Original Air Date: April 6, 2014
    PNWE20140406_RichardsonIntvw
  • New report shows water on Saturn’s moon
    A report published this week in Science magazine gave new details about the presence of water on Saturn’s moon Enceladus. Is is a sign of the possibility of life elsewhere in our solar system? One of the the article’s authors, David Stevenson of the California Institute of Technology, speaks with Hari Sreenivasan about the implications of the findings.
    Original Air Date: April 6, 2014
    This diagram illustrates the possible interior of Saturn's moon Enceladus.
  • ‪Boomtowns like Querétaro spur economic growth in Mexico‬
    ‪Mexico is now the third biggest trading partner of the United States. But with poverty afflicting half of the country's 120 million people, the country faces an uphill battle toward future prosperity. Correspondent Martin Fletcher reports from Queretaro.‬
    Original Air Date: April 6, 2014
    Pilar Abaroa, Communications Manager of Bombardier Aerospace Mexico and Martin Fletcher at the plant in Queretaro, Mexico.

Saturday, April 5, 2014

  • Voters head to the polls in Afghanistan
    Millions of voters came out for the presidential elections in Afghanistan on Saturday in the country’s first democratic transfer of power since the Taliban were ousted from power. The scene varied throughout the country with violence reported in some areas and ballot shortages in others. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with Kevin Sieff, the Washington Post’s bureau chief in Kabul
    Original Air Date: April 5, 2014
    An Afghan woman casts her vote at a polling station in Jalalabad east of Kabul, Afghanistan, Saturday, April 5, 2014
  • Viewers respond to teacher tenure report
    Viewers respond to NewsHour’s report on a lawsuit brought by nine California students challenging teacher tenure.
    Original Air Date: April 5, 2014
    NHWE20140405_ViewersLikeU_WEB2
  • Subway poetry project connects NYers
    Madeline Schwartzman’s mission is connect people in what she sees as an increasingly individualized society. Every day as she travels by subway Madeline asks fellow commuters to write a poem in her notebook. Some refuse, some accept, and now more than 100 of their poems are posted on Madeline’s website, 365 Day Subway: Poems by New Yorkers.
    Original Air Date: April 5, 2014
    subwaypoetrycar2
  • Organization offers free tax help
    The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program is a nationwide organization of tax preparers available to help low-income taxpayers. Last year alone, VITA helped prepare almost one and a half million individual tax returns completely free of charge.
    Original Air Date: April 5, 2014
    Couple at Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program
  • Is your tax preparer actually prepared?
    Each year about 42 million tax returns - nearly one-third - are prepared by tax professionals who are unaccredited and unregulated by the IRS. After a plan to regulate them was struck down by a federal court last year, there's more regulation on hairdressers in most of the country. Critics say this leaves low-income taxpayers, who depend on benefits in the tax code, particularly vulnerable.
    Original Air Date: April 5, 2014
    Income Tax -- Rapid Refund Here sign

Friday, April 4, 2014

  • Remembering photojournalist Anja Niedringhaus
    Veteran AP journalists Anja Niedringhaus and Kathy Gannon were traveling with election workers, soldiers and police in Khost province in Afghanistan when a police commander approached and shot them. Niedringhaus, a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer, was killed and Gannon was hospitalized. Kathleen Carroll, executive editor of The Associated Press, remembers Niedringhaus with Hari Sreenivasan.
    Original Air Date: April 4, 2014
    ap_niedringhaus-1
  • Afghan women share stories of surviving abuse
    Despite some progress in the treatment of Afghan women since the 2001 fall of the Taliban, there are thousands of females accused of so-called moral crimes who have been jailed or have fled to safe houses in fear of their lives. The Center for Investigative Reporting teams up with filmmaker Zohreh Soleimani, who has directed a documentary, "To Kill a Sparrow,” that sheds light on their oppression.
    Original Air Date: April 4, 2014
    jailedforlove
  • In 'Flash Boys,' a story of Wall Street reform from within
    Much of the stock market trading that occurs today is done with computer servers, completing hundreds of millions of orders in a system known as high-frequency trading. Author Michael Lewis has made this practice the subject of his latest book, “Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt.” He joins Judy Woodruff for a discussion about Wall Street trading and reform.
    Original Air Date: April 4, 2014
    michaellewis
  • Shields and Brooks on the power of campaign donors
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s news, including a Supreme Court ruling that lifts campaign donation limits, as well as public criticism for a pro-baseball player’s paternity leave.
    Original Air Date: April 4, 2014
    shieldsbrooks
  • Senator Shaheen on why Afghan women need protecting
    Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., is among the lawmakers looking into possibly granting Afghan women asylum in the United States in domestic abuse cases.
    Original Air Date: April 4, 2014
    Jeanne Shaheen

Thursday, April 3, 2014

  • Demystifying the ins and outs of college expenses and aid
    It’s the time of year when students around the country are receiving college acceptance letters. Now comes the number crunching: how will they pay? Hari Sreenivasan talks to Claudio Sanchez of NPR and Roberta Johnson of Iowa State University about calculating the costs and navigating the financial aid options.
    Original Air Date: April 3, 2014
    Harvard Ends Early Admission Policy
  • U.S. created ‘Cuba Twitter’ to sow unrest, reports AP
    An investigation by The Associated Press suggests that the USAID developed a bare-bones text messaging system called ZunZuneo, similar to a Twitter-style social media platform, to offer Cubans a system of free communication and encourage democracy. Thousands of private cellphone numbers were used to circumvent tight government controls. Gwen Ifill learns more from the AP’s Jack Gillum.
    Original Air Date: April 3, 2014
    usaid_zunzuneo
  • What drove Fort Hood gunman to open fire?
    Army officials shed new light on the suspected gunman believed to have perpetrated the second mass shooting at Fort Hood in five years. Three people were killed and 16 wounded before Ivan Lopez, an Iraq veteran, killed himself. Judy Woodruff talks to Phillip Carter of the Center for a New American Security and retired Brig. Gen. Stephen Xenakis.
    Original Air Date: April 3, 2014
    Multiple Soldiers Wounded By Shooter At Fort Hood

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