Friday, January 24, 2014

  • Orange County's campaign to waste less to feed hungry kids
    California's Orange County is home to some of the wealthiest Americans, as well as more than 150,000 children who don't know where their next meal will come from. Hari Sreenivasan reports on how the county is trying to address and combat the serious health effects of malnutrition for the OC's neediest residents.
    Original Air Date: January 24, 2014
  • Shields and Brooks on McDonnell and money, Clinton campaign
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week's news, including the income inequality and consequences of money in American politics, the federal corruption charges against former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell and some early super PAC support for Hillary Clinton.
    Original Air Date: January 24, 2014
  • Argentine poet fought against a military junta dies at 83
    Argentine poet Juan Gelman knew that words could be more powerful than guns. He used poetry to connect with his compatriots while Argentina suffered at the hands of a brutal military junta. Gelman died on Jan. 14 at the age of 83. Jeffrey Brown spoke to Ilan Stavans, a writer and professor of Latino culture at Amherst College.
    Original Air Date: January 24, 2014
  • Protest riots spread across Ukraine
    In Ukraine, violent anti-government protests have spread from the capital Kiev to nearly half the nation. The protesters say they won't stop until President Viktor Yanukovych steps down from power, despite his new pledge to reshuffle the government. Matt Frei of Independent Television News reports on the unrest.
    Original Air Date: January 24, 2014
    SERGEI SUPINSKY/AFP/Getty Images
  • Ilan Stavans reads Juan Gelman's poem 'End'
    Professor Ilan Stavans reads "End" by Argentine poet Juan Gelman, who died on Tuesday at the age of 83. For more Art Beat: newshour.pbs.org/art
    Original Air Date: January 24, 2014
  • What issue do you want Obama to address in his State of the Union?
    Original Air Date: January 24, 2014

Thursday, January 23, 2014

  • Pervasive technology raises tracking concerns
    Smart gadgets collect user information so that they can adapt to individual habits and personal tastes. But as this technology becomes more pervasive -- embedded in automobiles, refrigerators, even fire alarms and thermostats -- many fear the ways that private companies could misuse private customer data. Jeffrey Brown reports.
    Original Air Date: January 23, 2014
  • Revealing the origin of a secret black op prison
    In 2003, the CIA established a secret prison and black operations site at a villa in Poland. Washington Post reporter Adam Goldman joins Judy Woodruff to tell the story of how this clandestine prison played a role in the U.S. war on terror and what fallout these revelations have for the U.S. and in the international community.
    Original Air Date: January 23, 2014
  • Solar power projects confront habitat impact
    Around the country, developers, policy makers and environmentalists are faced with balancing the need for clean energy with the protection of the existing landscape. In California's Mojave Desert is one of the world's finest solar power resources, but it's also the habitat of endangered tortoises. Gabriela Quiros of KQED reports.
    Original Air Date: January 23, 2014
  • Reforming the voting process to improve access
    Operating on the principle that Americans should not find it difficult to vote, a bipartisan committee came to a unanimous conclusion about how to improve the election process. Robert Bauer and Benjamin Ginsberg, co-chairs of the Presidential Commission on Election Administration, join Gwen Ifill to discuss their suggestions.
    Original Air Date: January 23, 2014
  • More heated rhetoric ahead of Syrian negotiations
    Though open talks took a break for a day, U.N. Special Envoy to Syria Lakhdar Brahimi met separately with the Syrian government's delegation and the opposition, ahead of a planned, mediated meeting between the two sides. Hari Sreenivasan gets an update from chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner, reporting from Geneva.
    Original Air Date: January 23, 2014
  • Panel says NSA phone data collection is illegal
    Before the president gave a recent speech about why data collection should continue, a federal oversight board had recommended that the NSA cease collecting bulk phone records. Judy Woodruff gets two views from Elisebeth Collins Cook and David Medine, members of the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board.
    Original Air Date: January 23, 2014
  • 'These Birds Walk' clip: Not Running
    Omar faces Kirachi without his friend Shehr in a clip from "These Birds Walk," a documentary by Omar Mullick and Bassam Tariq that tells the story and the struggles of these children and those who look after them in Kirachi. For more Art Beat: newshour.pbs.org/art
    Original Air Date: January 23, 2014
  • 'These Birds Walk' clip: Among My People
    Edhi cares for runaway children in Pakistan as seen in "These Birds Walk," a documentary by Omar Mullick and Bassam Tariq that tells the story and the struggles of these children and those who look after them in Kirachi. For more Art Beat: newshour.pbs.org/art
    Original Air Date: January 23, 2014
  • What's the future of privacy in a big data world?
    Technologies that track data can make life more efficient, but can they go too far? Jeffrey Brown talks to technology and privacy experts Jules Polonetsky and Adam Thierer for more on why corporations should avoid being "creepy" and why it's important to empower consumers to hold companies and developers to strict standards.
    Original Air Date: January 23, 2014
  • 'These Birds Walk:' Blackout
    A blackout occurs in Kirachi at a foundation that cares for runaway kids. "These Birds Walk," a documentary by Omar Mullick and Bassam Tariq that tells the story and the struggles of these children and those who look after them in Kirachi. For more Art Beat: newshour.pbs.org/art
    Original Air Date: January 23, 2014
    January 23, 2014
  • 'These Birds Walk' clip: Running
    Runaway kid Omar darts through a market to a temple in Kirachi in a scene from "These Birds Walk," a documentary by Omar Mullick and Bassam Tariq that tells the story and the struggles of these children and those who look after them in Kirachi. For more Art Beat: newshour.pbs.org/art
    Original Air Date: January 23, 2014

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

  • Certification test focuses on readying students for work
    For American industry, finding employees who have all the requisite skills is a big challenge, and hiring people who don't stack up can cost businesses a great deal of money. Special correspondent John Tulenko from Learning Matters reports on a certification test that aims to boost U.S. students' workforce readiness.
    Original Air Date: January 22, 2014
  • Wednesday, January 22, 2014
    On our program tonight, we examine the fractious start to the Syrian peace talks in Switzerland. We ask analysts if anything positive can come from the conference. Also: the drought emergency in California, a test that could help close America's skills gap, plus federal corruption charges against a former Virginia governor and his wife.
    Original Air Date: January 22, 2014
    FULL PROGRAM
    January 22, 2014
  • Will talks yield any progress for ending the Syrian war?
    Chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner joins Gwen Ifill from Switzerland to further discuss the positions held by the opposing sides. Then Gwen Ifill gets reaction from Joshua Landis of the University of Oklahoma and Andrew Tabler of the Washington Institute about whether anything positive can come of the talks.
    Original Air Date: January 22, 2014
  • Inside a worm lab at MIT
    Original Air Date: January 22, 2014
    January 22, 2014
  • Indictment of former Gov. McDonnell shows living to extremes
    Former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell and his wife were indicted on federal corruption charges for receiving tens of thousands of dollars in gifts and loans from a wealthy campaign donor. The former rising star in the Republican party has vowed to fight the charges. Judy Woodruff talks to Rosalind Helderman of The Washington Post.
    Original Air Date: January 22, 2014
  • California's drought could mean bad news at grocery stores
    The record drought in California is not only likely to decrease the state's agricultural yield and affect food prices, it could also wreak severe economic consequences for rural communities. To discuss the impact on farming and for consumers, Jeffrey Brown talks to Karen Ross of the California Department of Food and Agriculture.
    Original Air Date: January 22, 2014
  • Will talks yield any progress for ending the Syrian war?
    Chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner joins Gwen Ifill from Switzerland to further discuss the positions held by the opposing sides. Then Gwen Ifill gets reaction from Joshua Landis of the University of Oklahoma and Andrew Tabler of the Washington Institute about whether anything positive can come of the talks.
    Original Air Date: January 22, 2014
  • Kerry: Finally, people came together on Syria
    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry spoke to the U.N. in Geneva on Wednesday, to mark the first time the Syrian government and opposition forces have come together for peace talks.
    Original Air Date: January 22, 2014

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

  • Why the Sochi Olympics may be a prime terror target
    Security pressures for the upcoming Olympics are high, due to the bloody history of its location. Sochi was the site of a massacre 150 years ago, bringing fresh symbolism to insurgents wishing to avenge more recent bloodshed. For more, Hari Sreenivasan talks to Robert Bruce Ware of Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.
    Original Air Date: January 21, 2014
  • Russia hunts for 'black widow' suspects ahead of Sochi games
    In Sochi, Russia, the site of the 2014 Winter Olympics, the images of three women were posted around the city. Known as "black widows," the suspects are believed to be potential suicide bombers, intent on attacking the games. Hari Sreenivasan looks at recent bombings in the region and how Russia and the U.S. are reacting.
    Original Air Date: January 21, 2014
  • Supreme Court considers genesis of 'Raging Bull'
    Gwen Ifill talks to Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal about two cases heard at the Supreme Court. In one, non-unionized health care workers argue they shouldn't have to pay for contract negotiations. Then, can an author's heir claim copyright infringement against the 1980 movie "Raging Bull" decades later?
    Original Air Date: January 21, 2014

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