Thursday, June 9, 2011

  • For Andrew Beyer, Secretariat Still Finishes First
    Andrew Beyer has been a horse racing journalist since 1966, an achievement in itself considering the ongoing woes of the newspaper industry. While his longevity as a sportswriter is certainly an accomplishment, his greatest claim to fame is arguably the creation and industry adoption of the Beyer Speed Figures. Beyer describes why
    Original Air Date: June 9, 2011
  • Why Does Yale Cost $55,000 a Year?
    Recently, we caught up with economist Robert Shiller closer to home -- outside the admissions office at Yale University, where he's taught economics since 1982. He suggested we waylay a Yale campus tour -- guide and group -- to get their take on inflation. One soon materialized. It happened to be a tourguide's tour, a seasoned undergrad chaperone taking her newly recruited charges on a dry run.
    Original Air Date: June 9, 2011
  • U.S. Athletes Are Part of the Art at the 2011 Venice Biennale
    Artists Guillermo Calzadilla and Jennifer Allora designed this year's U.S. Pavilion, 'Gloria,' at the Venice Biennale, which features U.S. Olympic athletes performing as part of the installations.
    Original Air Date: June 9, 2011

Wednesday, June 8, 2011

  • Winds Keep Arizona Fire Growing Toward Record Size
    The so-called "Wallow" blaze is now the size of Phoenix and spreading fast. Jeffrey Brown gets an update from a reporter on the scene.
    Original Air Date: June 8, 2011
  • Search for Effective PTSD Treatments Shows Some Promise
    As part of a new partnership with the NewsHour, Jay Shefsky of WTTW's "Chicago Tonight" reports on scientists' search for effective treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder.
    Original Air Date: June 8, 2011
  • World Tests IPv6: Why 4.2 Billion Internet Addresses Just Weren't Enough
    More than 400 organizations and Internet giants participated Wednesday in a trial run of a new addressing system, called Internet Protocol version 6, known as IPv6. Hari Sreenivasan reports on World IPv6 Day, and Leslie Daigle of the Internet Society explains how it will affect your life online.
    Original Air Date: June 8, 2011
  • 4 1/2 billion IP Addresses: Just How Big is That?
    Hari Sreenivasan turns to one of the Internet's orginal architect's, Vint Cerf with questions on the latest move to handle a fast-growing Internet. Hari asks, did you ever think we'd run out of 4 1/2 billion addresses?
    Original Air Date: June 8, 2011
  • Afghan Stability Still Elusive as U.S. Grapples With Exit Strategy
    Is the long-running effort to stabilize Afghanistan doing more harm than good? A new Senate investigation reveals a grim outlook for U.S. nation-building efforts there. Judy Woodruff gets views from Sens. Robert Menendez, D- N.J., and Saxby Chambliss, R-Ga.
    Original Air Date: June 8, 2011
  • IPv4's Early Days
    Hari Sreenivasan turns to one of the Internet's orginal architect's, Vint Cerf with questions on latest move to handle a fast-growing Internet. Hari asks, "When you started this experiment back in the 1970's, what were you trying to build?"
    Original Air Date: June 8, 2011
    June 8, 2011
  • Europe's Economy, Libya Pose Test for U.S.-German Relationship
    German leader Angela Merkel's visit to the U.S. comes at a critical time for the European power. Ray Suarez reports.
    Original Air Date: June 8, 2011
  • Performance: The David Wax Museum
    The David Wax Museum (David Wax and Suz Slezak) play "The Least I Can Do" off their most recent album, "Everything is Saved".
    Original Air Date: June 8, 2011
  • Profile: The David Wax Museum
    David Wax and Suz Slezak of The David Wax Museum talk about their mexo-americana sound, playing the donkey jawbone (quijada) and what's ahead for the nearly four year old band.
    Original Air Date: June 8, 2011

Tuesday, June 7, 2011

  • Internet Readies for Systemwide Change
    AS IP addresses run out, organizations worldwide prepare for a test drive of the new system transition. CNET's Molly Wood explains.
    Original Air Date: June 7, 2011
  • 'The Tiger's Wife' Mixes Realism, Fantasy in Larger-Than-Life Tale From Balkans
    In her first novel, Tea Obreht mixes realism and fantasy in a larger-than-life story about her native Balkans. Jeffrey Brown sits down with the author to discuss her debut book, "The Tiger's Wife."
    Original Air Date: June 7, 2011
  • Company Combats Human Rights Absuses With High-Tech Tools
    Spencer Michels reports on a California company using high-tech tools to document patterns of brutality and combat human rights abuses across the globe.
    Original Air Date: June 7, 2011
  • AIDS at 30: Who's at Greatest Risk of Infection Now?
    In the spring of 1981, young gay men in New York and California were being sickened by rare forms of pneumonia and cancer, and the unknown disease fueled fears across society. What we now know as HIV/AIDS was once considered a death sentence. Ray Suarez reports on the state of the disease, plus the risks, treatment and research.
    Original Air Date: June 7, 2011
  • Fukushima Nuclear Disaster: 'a Failure of Regulation, not Operation'
    Three months after a massive earthquake and tsunami ravaged the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power Plant in Japan, a new report puts the amount of radiation released at more than double earlier estimates. Judy Woodruff discusses the report's findings with James Acton of The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
    Original Air Date: June 7, 2011
  • What More Could, Should Government Do for U.S. Economy?
    A new Washington Post/ABC News poll finds that 57 percent of those surveyed say an economic turnaround has not yet begun in the U.S. Gwen Ifill discusses what's next for the economy -- and the political implications -- with USA Today's Susan Page, Wells Fargo economist Mark Vitner and Tom Binnings of Summit Economics.
    Original Air Date: June 7, 2011
  • Saving: Brought to You By the Letter 'S'
    Paul Solman heads to Sesame Street to talk to some Muppets about teaching your children how to learn how to save.
    Original Air Date: June 7, 2011
  • Political Checklist: Troubled Economy a Problem for Obama
    Will President Obama run against a Republican in 2012, or the state of the U.S. economy? David Chalian, Judy Woodruff and Gwen Ifill discuss that question in light of new polling numbers showing that six in 10 Americans have a negative opinion of President Obama's handling of the economy.
    Original Air Date: June 7, 2011

Monday, June 6, 2011

  • Monastery Works to Preserve Sacred Texts
    Fred de Sam Lazaro tells the story of one Minnesota monastery's mission to preserve sacred religious texts from deterioration.
    Original Air Date: June 6, 2011
  • Remembering Diplomat Lawrence Eagleburger
    Lawrence Eagleburger held crucial foreign policy posts under five different presidents and was anything but an ordinary diplomat. Margaret Warner remembers his life and career.
    Original Air Date: June 6, 2011
  • Apple Unveils New iCloud Music Service, but Privacy Issues May Lurk
    Steve Jobs returned to the public stage Monday to announce Apple's iCloud, a new online music storage service. Ray Suarez discusses the announcement with The Washington Post's Technology Reporter Cecilia Kang.
    Original Air Date: June 6, 2011
  • Grading Schools: How to Determine the 'Good' From the 'Bad'?
    Students get graded by test scores, but how do we best determine if a school is "good" or "bad"? Education Correspondent John Merrow examines that question.
    Original Air Date: June 6, 2011
  • New Promise Shown in Treatments for Melanoma, Breast Cancer
    Two studies have doctors energized about the prospects for treating people with advanced cases of the deadly skin cancer and the prospects for a new breast cancer drug. Judy Woodruff discusses the latest developments with Dr. George Sledge of The American Society of Clinical Oncology.
    Original Air Date: June 6, 2011
  • Weiner Admits to Sending Lewd Photos, Faces Call for Ethics Investigation
    Rep. Anthony Weiner, D - N.Y., went before cameras Monday to admit to sending sexually explicit photos and messages to several different women. Jeffrey Brown discusses the scandal with NewsHour Political Editor David Chalian.
    Original Air Date: June 6, 2011
  • Weiner Admits Sending Lewd Photos, Says He Will Not Resign
    New York Democratic Rep. Anthony Weiner admitted Monday that he is responsible for sending lewd photos to women on Twitter, but maintained that he will not resign his Congressional post.
    Original Air Date: June 6, 2011
  • Weekly Poem: 'Home Brew' by Tony Barnstone
    Poet, translator and editor Tony Barnstone is professor of English at Whittier College. He is the author of several books, including "Tongue of War: From Pearl Harbor to Nagasaki" (2009, BkMk Press), which won both the John Ciardi Prize and the Grand Prize in the Strokestown International Poetry Festival.
    Original Air Date: June 6, 2011

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