Wednesday, June 12, 2013

  • How Big a Boost Do Working Seniors Give the Economy?
    Encore Careers' Marc Freedman sums up the benefits of older workers staying on the job to support the really old and really young: "we could turn the dependency ratio into an abundancy ratio."
    Original Air Date: June 12, 2013
  • Joel Peters, Paramedic
    Joel Peters is a 62-year-old paramedic who works 12-hour shifts. He does not know if he'll be able to retire or what his financial future will hold, but he is sure that he will not be moving from his rural home near Taos, NM.
    Original Air Date: June 12, 2013
    June 12, 2013
  • The Rural / Urban Divide
    While the Great Recession took a toll on everyone, there was a distinct difference between rural and urban America. The percentage of older Americans employed full- or part-time actually declined in the most urban, densely populated counties. In smaller rural counties, however, the number of older Americans in the workforce rose sharply.
    Original Air Date: June 12, 2013
    June 12, 2013
  • 'I Can't Afford to Stop Working Yet.'
    Rather than retire after a long career in the federal government, 63 year old Charles Smith works in a produce department for $10 an hour to support his family.
    Original Air Date: June 12, 2013
  • Paul Solman: 'More Seniors Than Ever, Still on the Job"
    Check out our project, New Adventures for Older Workers, to see how this "video chat" by Paul Solman fits in.
    Original Air Date: June 12, 2013
  • The Paul Solman Interview
    The Paul Solman Interview
    Original Air Date: June 12, 2013

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

  • Appeals Process Added for Kids Waiting for Lung Transplants
    Two terminally ill children with end-stage cystic fibrosis are at the center of a battle about organ transplants. In Philadelphia, a federal judge decided that both kids, who are younger than 12, must be made more of a priority on a waiting list for adult lungs. Ray Suarez gets analysis from Arthur Caplan of New York University.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2013
  • Could Agriculture Bloom in the Desert?
    Thanks to Qatar's harsh desert environment and growing population, researchers have embraced the tiny country as a laboratory to address global concerns. As part of the NewsHour's series "Food for 9 Billion," special correspondent Jon Miller reports on their inventive efforts to ensure water and food security for the future.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2013
  • Justice Department Drops Fight on Morning-After Pill
    The Justice Department reversed its stance on age-restricted access to the emergency contraceptive known as the morning-after pill. Plan B One-Step will now be available to females of all ages without a prescription. NPR's Julie Rovner joins Judy Woodruff to examine the decision.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2013
  • Google Asks Approval on PRISM Program Role Transparency
    After news broke that companies such as as Google, Facebook and Yahoo provided some user information to the PRISM surveillance program, the tech giants have started to grapple with how to comply with government orders while offering more transparency to users. Jeffrey Brown talks to Google's chief legal officer, David Drummond.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2013
  • How the Government Manages Workers With Classified Access
    Edward Snowden's leak of classified NSA documents bring up concerns about the reliance on contractors within the intelligence community. Gwen Ifill talks to Irving Lachow of Center for a New American Security and Dana Priest of The Washington Post about how the government protects employees' access to sensitive information.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2013
  • Google: We Don't Give Government Acesss To Our Servers
    In his first U.S. television interview since the latest news broke of the government's surveillance program, Google's chief legal officer David Drummond told PBS NewsHour senior correspondent Jeffrey Brown on Tuesday that the company has given the U.S. government information on only a "tiny fraction" of its hundreds of millions of users.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2013
  • How Technology Widens Class Divisions
    Paul Solman speaks with Jaron Lanier, widely regarded as the father of virtual reality and the author of “Who Owns the Future?”, about how big computers -- and the government and businesses they empower -- are creating more economic inequality.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2013
  • From Lecture Hall to Graveyard
    Dr. Ronald Stockton has been teaching political science and international relations for decades at the University of Michigan, Dearborn. But rather than sit at his desk, this septuagenarian slips on boots and a wide-brimmed hat and leads his students through hours-long walking tours of the area's historic graveyards.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2013
  • Obama Calls on Congress to Pass Immigration Reform Bill
    President Barack Obama delivered remarks at the White House on Tuesday, June 11, reiterating his strong support for commonsense reform legislation to fix our broken immigration system, and the economic and national security benefits that reform will deliver. His remarks the same day the Senate's first floor vote.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2013

Monday, June 10, 2013

  • Remembering Nelson Mandela: A Look Back
    Charlayne Hunter-Gault takes a look back at Nelson Mandela's life and legacy.
    Original Air Date: June 10, 2013
  • Book Explores How Biotech Creates Weird Wildlife
    Ray Suarez talks with writer Emily Anthes about the sometimes wild and weird outcomes when scientists experiment on animals. In her new book, "Frankenstein's Cat: Cuddling up to Biotech's Brave New Beasts," Anthes looks at the ethical limits of -- and our emotional reactions to -- the use of animals to explore biotechnology.
    Original Air Date: June 10, 2013
  • U.S. Works on Relationship With China
    President Barack Obama met with China's President Xi Jingping in a two-day summit to discuss issues like cyber security and North Korea. Jeffrey Brown gets analysis from Douglas Paal of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and retired Army Col. Larry Wortzel of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission.
    Original Air Date: June 10, 2013
  • Balancing Costa Rica's Farming With Preservation with Nature
    As part of the NewsHour's series, "Food for 9 Billion," special correspondent Sam Eaton reports on a push in Costa Rica to embrace forest preservation and biodiversity while keeping up with the demand for farming. Researchers are measuring the helpful roles of small animals like bats, birds and bees.
    Original Air Date: June 10, 2013
  • Public Debate When It Comes to Secret Surveillance
    Did Edward Snowden give Americans vital information about how they're being watched or did he put national security at risk? Gwen Ifill moderates a debate on the public and political oversight of U.S. intelligence with former Democratic congresswoman Jane Harman and James Bamford, author of "The Shadow Factory."
    Original Air Date: June 10, 2013
  • News Wrap: Car Bombings Continues Sectarian Violence in Iraq
    In other news Monday, car bombers in Iraq killed at least 57 people, the latest in a new wave of Shiite-Sunni violence. Also, the Obama administration could decide this week whether it will send arms to the Syrian rebels. Top U.S. officials, including Secretary of State John Kerry, began meetings to consider the question.
    Original Air Date: June 10, 2013
  • Former Intelligence Director: Leaked Details Help Enemies
    The former National Intelligence director says the government needs to take some of the mystery out of U.S. intelligence programs, but not secret aspects of how they work. Judy Woodruff talks to retired Adm. Dennis Blair about implications of NSA contractor Edward Snowden's revealing the existence of surveillance programs.
    Original Air Date: June 10, 2013
  • When Does Genetic Modification of Animals Cross a Line?
    In a web exclusive interview, Emily Anthes, author of the book, "Frankenstein's Cat," talks to Ray Suarez about the ethical limits when using animals in biotech research and development.
    Original Air Date: June 10, 2013
  • Wanting, But Physically Unable, to Keep Working
    When Mike Kemp bought a bike store in 2001, he had no problem pulling 40 pound bikes off the top shelf. Now 69 and with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), each box moves him closer to retirement. We profilled Mr. Kemp as part of our upcoming report, America's New Old Workforce. Stay tuned for Wednesday when we launch our project examining the so-called "death of retirement."
    Original Air Date: June 10, 2013

Sunday, June 9, 2013

  • NewsHour "NewsMinute" | June 3 - June 7, 2013
    We took a look back at this week's PBS NewsHour segments and compiled some of the quotes and bites that stood out in the stories we shared this week.
    Original Air Date: June 9, 2013

Friday, June 7, 2013

  • Search for Dissident Father Inspires Fictional Retelling
    Ti-Anna Wang is the daughter of a once prominent Chinese dissident, who named her in honor of the deadly protests in Tiananmen Square. The story of Wang's search for her father, who was arrested in 2002, inspired a new young adult novel. Gwen Ifill talks with Wang and The Washington Post's Fred Hiatt, author of "Nine Days."
    Original Air Date: June 7, 2013
  • Shields and Brooks on NSA Data, Christie's Election Maneuver
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks discuss the week's political news with Judy Woodruff, including the NSA's secret collection of phone, Internet and credit card data, foreign policy staff changes in the Obama administration and the special election to replace late Sen. Frank Lautenberg.
    Original Air Date: June 7, 2013
  • Can Peace for Lebanon's Religious Sects Survive Syria's War?
    Fragile relations between Lebanon's various religious sects have been strained by the continuing fallout of neighbor Syria's civil war and resentment of Syrian refugees. Margaret Warner concludes her series of reports from Lebanon with a closer look at the country's sectarian politics.
    Original Air Date: June 7, 2013

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