Friday, December 9, 2011

  • At Va. Tech, a Sense of Bewilderment, Sadness as Shooting Motive Remains Unclear
    The Virginia Tech community was terrorized by another deadly shooting attack Thursday that left a police officer dead, but the response this time by the university and police was much different than the 2007 massacre on campus. Hari Sreenivasan reports.
    Original Air Date: December 9, 2011
  • What Would Debt Deal Mean for Euro, European Union, U.K.?
    After marathon talks, the European Union moved closer to a deal to solve the debt crisis. Jeffrey Brown discusses what the agreement might mean for Europe with the EU's Deputy Chief of Mission Francois Rivasseau and Dan McCrum of The Financial Times.
    Original Air Date: December 9, 2011
  • The Army's New Boot Camp: Building Mental Toughness
    The Army's new Comprehensive Soldier Fitness program soldiers to count blessings, ask for support when necessary and accept that it's OK to show emotion sometimes. By changing the way soldiers think about coping with stress, loss and trauma, Army officials hope to reverse the alarming and growing number of soldiers suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and too often, suicide.
    Original Air Date: December 9, 2011
  • On Dec. 14, Join Secretary Clinton, Jim Lehrer for Live Talk About Jobs, Trade
    NewsHour Executive Editor Jim Lehrer and correspondents Jeffrey Brown and Paul Solman will facilitate discussions about innovation and the global marketplace, in partnership with Intel, The Innovation Economy and The Aspen Institute.Starting at 8:45 a.m. ET on Dec. 14, you can watch the conversations, including Lehrer's interview with Clinton, live on the NewsHour's website.
    Original Air Date: December 9, 2011
  • Conversation: Why Do Americans Protest Art?
    Jeffrey Brown talks to Steven Tepper, author of "Not Here, Not Now, Not That! Protest Over Art and Culture in America."
    Original Air Date: December 9, 2011

Thursday, December 8, 2011

  • Report Raises New Concerns About Air Force's Disposal of Remains
    The Washington Post reported Thursday that incinerated partial remains of 274 troops had been taken from Dover Air Force Base in Delaware and disposed of in a landfill in Virginia. Jeffrey Brown discusses the new concerns with The Post's Craig Whitlock, who broke the story.
    Original Air Date: December 8, 2011
  • Seattleites Construct Rain Gardens to Curb Pollution From Stormwater Runoff
    In an effort to curb pollution from stormwater runoff, Seattle residents have begun a campaign to build 12,000 rain gardens around the Puget Sound. Katie Campbell of KCTS 9 reports.
    Original Air Date: December 8, 2011
  • Occupy Movements in San Diego, Oklahoma City, Boise Dig in
    The Occupy Movement stayed in the headlines this week as police broke up the San Francisco camp, but groups are digging in and holding up in many other places around the country. KPBS San Diego, OETA Oklahoma and Idaho Public Television report.
    Original Air Date: December 8, 2011
  • Obama Back in Campaign Mode as White House Sizes up Gingrich, Romney
    President Obama is still waiting for Republicans to pick a nominee to challenge him in next year's election, but that hasn't stopped him from entering the campaign fray. Judy Woodruff discusses the state of Mr. Obama's re-election campaign with The Washington Post's Anne Kornblut and The New York Times' Jeff Zeleny.
    Original Air Date: December 8, 2011
  • Deadly Virginia Tech Shooting Brings Back Fears, Memories
    A shooting Thursday on the campus of Virginia Tech University left two people dead, and roused fears and memories of the tragedy that occurred there four years ago. Jeffrey Brown reports.
    Original Air Date: December 8, 2011
  • Art of the Science Tattoo
    This week, author Carl Zimmer spoke with Hari about his entry into this world of body art, the process of researching his latest book, "Science Ink: Tattoos for the Science Obsessed," and some of the surprises he encountered along the way.
    Original Air Date: December 8, 2011

Wednesday, December 7, 2011

  • A Possible Second Home for Humanity Found, but the Commute's Brutal
    Scientists have discovered a so-called "Goldilocks" planet with a temperature that is not too hot, not too cold, but maybe just right to support life. Correspondent Spencer Michels reports.
    Original Air Date: December 7, 2011
  • Syria's Assad Denies Ordering Deadly Crackdown as Sanctions Drive Down Currency
    Syria's President Bashar al-Assad denied in a Wednesday interview that he ordered a deadly crackdown on protesters. Jeffrey Brown speaks with NPR's Deborah Amos, reporting from Beirut, about how the interview will be viewed inside Syria, the state of the uprising in Homs and the effects of sanctions on businesses and citizens.
    Original Air Date: December 7, 2011
  • Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Nominee Cordray Faces Senate Battle
    Richard Cordray, President Obama's latest pick to lead the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, faces an uphill battle for confirmation in the Senate this week. Judy Woodruff discusses the nomination and disagreement over the new agency's structure with Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, and Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, R-Texas.
    Original Air Date: December 7, 2011
  • 'A Big Surprise' as Sebelius Nixes Plan B for Young Girls Without Prescription
    In a very public disagreement Wednesday, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius blocked the Food and Drug Administration from allowing girls under 17 to buy the Plan B morning-after pill without a prescription. Jeffrey Brown discusses the controversy with Rob Stein of The Washington Post.
    Original Air Date: December 7, 2011
  • Supreme Court Hears Dispute Over Ownership of Montana's Rivers
    Montana's rivers are pristine and iconic, but they are also at the center of a property rights dispute that went all the way to the Supreme Court on Wednesday. Gwen Ifill discusses Montana's dam dispute with Marcia Coyle.
    Original Air Date: December 7, 2011
  • Egyptians Look to Next Phase of Democracy
    Charles Sennott of GlobalPost, who has reported in-depth in Egypt, describes the latest round of voting and growing disenchantment over the pace of the country's transition to democracy.
    Original Air Date: December 7, 2011

Tuesday, December 6, 2011

  • Parlez-Vous? Some Louisiana Pupils Being Immersed in French Instruction
    Louisiana's French heritage is being embraced in many immersion classrooms in the state. It goes beyond language -- some students are learning math, science and social studies in French. Sue Lincoln of Louisiana Public Broadcasting and the Southern Education Desk reports.
    Original Air Date: December 6, 2011
  • War-Torn Afghanistan Suffers Worst Sectarian Violence in Years
    After twin suicide bombings killed dozens of Shiite worshipers Tuesday in Afghanistan, a Sunni militant group in Pakistan claimed responsibility. Afghanistan's worst sectarian violence in years happened a day after a major conference in Germany about stabilizing the country. Judy Woodruff gets two views on the violence.
    Original Air Date: December 6, 2011
  • Death of Hockey 'Enforcer' Raises Mental Health Concerns for NHL
    Derek Boogaard, an NHL hockey player, died in May at the age of 28 from an overdose of alcohol and drugs. Research done after his death has found that he suffered from a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head. The New York Times has published an extensive series on Boogaard's life and death.
    Original Air Date: December 6, 2011
  • As Detroit Budget Crisis Deepens, Is State Takeover Nearing?
    With Detroit on track to completely run out of cash in four months, Michigan is beginning a 30-day review of the city's beleaguered finances. A move that could lead to a state takeover. Special correspondent Desiree Cooper of Detroit Public Television reports.
    Original Air Date: December 6, 2011
  • 'Even Light Can't Escape' Discovered Black Holes
    Astronomers recently discovered two massive black holes over 300 million light years away. Gwen Ifill gets the details about what the discovery means for the universe.
    Original Air Date: December 6, 2011
  • NewsHour Connect: DCentric Examines Washington D.C.'s Unemployment Disparity
    Washington D.C. is a city that is prospering.It is in the unique position of having more jobs than residents. But there's also a great divide in the District. While professionals flock to the city for their careers, there are parts of the city where unemployment is 26 percent. Hari Sreenivasan checks in with WAMU DCentric reporter Elahe Izadi about her series this week, Division of Labor.
    Original Air Date: December 6, 2011

Monday, December 5, 2011

  • Politics, Race Play Role in Presidential Pardons, Investigation Finds
    People who are white and well-connected are more likely to receive presidential pardons, a ProPublica/Washington Post investigation discovered this week. ProPublica's Dafna Linzer goes over the details of the investigation with Gwen Ifill.
    Original Air Date: December 5, 2011
  • For Wind Energy's Future, Researchers Look High in the Sky
    The next major innovation in wind power might not involve big, white turbines dotting the countryside. KQED QUEST reports on research being done on "tethered airfoils" that could capture wind energy more efficiently that earthbound turbines. This report is part of the NewsHour's Connect series of quality public media reporting.
    Original Air Date: December 5, 2011
  • What Would Deficit Limits Mean for Eurozone, Future of Euro?
    For a look at the tough week ahead for the eurozone and its leaders, Jeffrey Brown is joined by Thomas Kleine-Brockhoff, senior director for strategy at the German Marshall Fund of the United States.
    Original Air Date: December 5, 2011
  • After String of Disasters, Aid Organizations Struggle to Meet Demands
    Private aid organizations are struggling to maintain their funding levels for relief efforts in the wake of multiple crises around the world. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on the trend as part of the Under-Told Stories project.
    Original Air Date: December 5, 2011
  • After Surging in Polls, How Could Newt Gingrich Clinch Nomination?
    A month away from the Iowa caucuses, two new polls show that the race for the Republican presidential nomination has a new frontrunner: Newt Gingrich. Judy Woodruff takes a look at the latest poll results with The Washington Post's Dan Balz and J. Ann Selzer, president of Selzer & Company, which conducted one of the Iowa polls.
    Original Air Date: December 5, 2011

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