Wednesday, August 13, 2014

  • Are U.S. efforts spread too thin to succeed in Afghanistan?
    James Dobbins has just ended his second stint as the U.S. special representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan. He joins chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner for a conversation about the consequences of the deadlocked election in Afghanistan, the looming drawdown of American troops and lessons from the Iraq war and other conflicts in the Middle East.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2014
  • Lauren Bacall lit up the screen with glamour and strength
    Actress Lauren Bacall, who leapt into fame alongside Humphrey Bogart at the age of 19, embodied flinty, female independence as well as old Hollywood glamour. Ann Hornaday of The Washington Post joins Jeffrey Brown to recall Bacall’s mature screen presence, her infamous romance with Humphrey Bogart and the roles and directors that shaped her career.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2014
  • Snowden fears Americans will get ‘NSA fatigue’
    NSA leaker Edward Snowden discloses in an extensive profile in Wired magazine that the U.S. government ran a top secret cyber-war program, which he claims could accidentally start a war. Gwen Ifill gets an update on Snowden and his latest revelations from the man who interviewed him, James Bamford of Wired.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2014

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

  • Robin Williams made transformation look effortless
    The death of Robin Williams, beloved American comedian and actor, has sparked an outpouring of shock and sadness. Jeffrey Brown joins A. O. Scott of The New York Times and Budd Friedman, founder of Improv Comedy Club, to look back at the “exuberance, sweetness and generosity” of William’s talent.
    Original Air Date: August 12, 2014
  • Family of slain Mo. teen call for calm after violent protest
    For a second night, protests boiled over into violence in Ferguson, Missouri, after the fatal police shooting of an unarmed African-American teenager on Saturday. In a statement, President Obama said pain over the killing should be expressed in a way “that heals, not in a way that wounds.” For a closer look at the unrest, Judy Woodruff talks to Jim Salter of the Associated Press.
    Original Air Date: August 12, 2014
  • Perfecting the art of the redrawn Congressional district
    It’s no accident that 90 percent of Congress is re-elected every time; districts can be carefully drawn to protect incumbents. In Florida, a federal judge ruled that the design of two districts illegally favor sitting politicians, and ordered new maps just weeks before the primary elections. Political editor Domenico Montanaro joins Gwen Ifill for an in-depth explanation.
    Original Air Date: August 12, 2014
  • Is talk of ‘magic bullet’ treatments hurting Ebola efforts?
    Judy Woodruff leads a conversation with Lawrence Gostin of Georgetown Law and Jonathan Moreno of the University of Pennsylvania on using untested drugs to fight the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the possibility of a new experimental vaccine from Canada, as well as why the focus on experimental drugs is distracting from other vital measures.
    Original Air Date: August 12, 2014
  • A new life for old books
    The discovery of a set of old encyclopedias bound for the trash sparked a creative outlet for trained psychologist Julia Strand. Strand breathes new life into old books that would otherwise be discarded, creating intricate carvings of the content within the pages.
    Original Air Date: August 12, 2014
    August 12, 2014
  • One Market Basket employee's loyalty to Artie T.
    Market Basket office manager Mary Jane Findeisen explains why she's protesting in support of ousted Market Basket CEO Arthur T. Demoulas, who took a personal interest in her family.
    Original Air Date: August 12, 2014

Monday, August 11, 2014

  • Why media companies are ditching their newspaper operations
    A number of big name media companies have shed their print divisions in recent days. Publishers including Gannett and the Tribune Company are moving away from the multi-platform model to isolate print ventures from digital and broadcast media. Judy Woodruff examines the strategy behind these moves, as well as what is lost, with Ken Doctor of Newsonomics.
    Original Air Date: August 11, 2014
  • Killing of a Missouri teenager by police triggers unrest
    The killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown by a police officer in a suburb of St. Louis, Missouri, has sparked outrage and protests. Brown, a young African-American man, was unarmed. Jeffrey Brown gets reaction from Sherrilyn Ifill of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund and Greg Meyer, former captain of the Los Angeles Police Department.
    Original Air Date: August 11, 2014
  • Somalia’s president on challenges to building democracy
    Somalia has been plagued by war, corruption and terrorism, but its leader says he wants to change its course. President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud joins Judy Woodruff to discuss last week’s U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, infiltration of al-Shabab militants into government, the media and beyond, as well as serious concerns that the president hasn’t achieved the stability his country has sought.
    Original Air Date: August 11, 2014
  • Can Abadi form a workable government for Iraq?
    Iraq’s president named a new prime minister, but Nouri al-Maliki refuses to give up his post, while the fight against Islamic militants continue. Gwen Ifill is joined by Deputy Assistant Secretary of State Brett McGurk for an update on the political turmoil in Iraq, plus analysis from Zalmay Khalilzad, the former U.S. ambassador to Iraq, and Laith Kubba of the National Endowment for Democracy.
    Original Air Date: August 11, 2014

Sunday, August 10, 2014

  • Poll: Student loan debt undermines graduate happiness
    Gallup poll finds that student loan debt undermines the happiness of graduates for years following their graduation. Doug Belkin of the Wall Street Journal joins Hari Sreenivasan from Chicago.
    Original Air Date: August 10, 2014
  • Beyond Iraq, what's next for the Islamic State?
    As members of the Islamic State continue to brutally terrorize civilians in Iraq, experts are focusing on what's to come. Senior and National Securities Studies Fellow at the New America Foundation Douglas Ollivant joins Hari Sreenivasan.
    Original Air Date: August 10, 2014
  • From JFK to Warhol, artist Jamie Wyeth paints what he knows
    Painter Jamie Wyeth, a descendant of one of the country's most famous artist families, recounts the rich details of 60-year career, spanning from the rugged coast of Maine to painting President John F. Kennedy to befriending Andy Warhol. WGBH's Jared Bowen reports.
    Original Air Date: August 10, 2014

Saturday, August 9, 2014

  • Why Obama wants to use air power against the Islamic State
    In order to protect Americans and provide humanitarian aid to Iraq, President Obama on Saturday discussed efforts to slow advances by Islamic jihadists in northern Iraq and rescue thousands of civilians who have fled from them. Douglas Ollivant, a senior national security fellow at the New America Foundation, joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the details.
    Original Air Date: August 9, 2014
  • Panic consumes Iraqi Kurdistan as residents flee for safety
    As the Islamic State Group moves even closer to Erbil, the capital of Iraqi Kurdistan, residents of the Kurdish region are fleeing in droves to safer areas, as a state of panic consumes the region. Nour Malas of the Wall Street Journal joins Hari Sreenivasan.
    Original Air Date: August 9, 2014
  • Court: Violent rap lyrics not sufficient evidence for murder
    In a ruling that could have national implications, the New Jersey State Supreme Court unanimously agreed that Vonte Skinner's rap lyrics should not have been admitted at a murder trial, ruling that those graphic lyrics weren't sufficient evidence to prove a confession.
    Original Air Date: August 9, 2014

Friday, August 8, 2014

  • Need persists for new generation of Freedom Schools
    During the long, hot Freedom Summer of 1964, young volunteers faced threats and violence in Mississippi to register voters and build a network of enrichment schools to teach young African-Americans about themselves and their history. Fifty years later, nearly 200 chapters are carrying on the mission for a new generation. Gwen Ifill reports.
    Original Air Date: August 8, 2014
  • Supermarket employees unite in profit-sharing family feud
    The owners of a successful New England grocery store chain are in a family feud over whether company profits should go to shareholders or to employees, some of whom have abandoned their shifts and hit the streets. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports on the solidarity of non-union Market Basket workers in protesting for their company's popular president.
    Original Air Date: August 8, 2014
  • Is the U.S. underestimating the Islamic State?
    Is the U.S. doing enough to defeat the militants of the Islamic State group and relieve the humanitarian crisis in Iraq? Hari Sreenivasan gets two views from Feisal Istrabadi of Indiana University and retired Army Col. Derek Harvey.
    Original Air Date: August 8, 2014
  • Shields and Brooks on Iraq reluctance, Nixon’s legacy
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s top news, including U.S. airstrikes against the Islamic State militant group in Iraq, how Americans are grading President Obama’s foreign policy performance, plus how men and women are hoping for different outcomes in November’s election and looking back at Richard Nixon.
    Original Air Date: August 8, 2014
  • Ballerina Misty Copeland stands out in world of white swans
    In a ballet world filled with white swans, Misty Copeland stands out. As the first African-American female to hold the rank of Soloist at American Ballet Theater in 20 years, Copeland has had an improbable rise. In her new memoir “Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina,” Copeland recounts that journey from poverty to the spotlight of one of America's top ballet companies.
    Original Air Date: August 8, 2014

Thursday, August 7, 2014

  • Why are we still fascinated by Nixon?
    Interest in the character and legacy of President Richard Nixon has endured 40 years since his resignation. Judy Woodruff joins Beverly Gage of Yale University, Timothy Naftali of New York University, Patrick Buchanan, author of "The Greatest Comeback" and Luke Nichter, author of "The Nixon Tapes," to discuss Nixon’s many facets and how his presidency changed American government.
    Original Air Date: August 7, 2014
  • Debating reforms to boost rehabilitation, lower recidivism
    The calls to address prison crowding and conditions have intensified as American inmate populations have grown. Jeffrey Brown gets debate on the shifting perceptions of the criminal justice system from Bill McCollum, former attorney general of Florida, Bryan Stevenson of Equal Justice Initiative, and Pat Nolan of the American Conservative Union Foundation.
    Original Air Date: August 7, 2014
  • Russian food import ban doesn’t shake E.U. sanction resolve
    Chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner talks to Gwen Ifill about the U.S. response to Russia’s new ban against most Western food imports, the E.U.’s growing resolve to stand with the U.S. and the growing potential for Russian troops to invade Eastern Ukraine.
    Original Air Date: August 7, 2014
  • Islamist move into Kurdish territory changes U.S. equation
    The White House is weighing launching airstrikes and sending humanitarian aid as the crisis darkens for displaced Christians and Yazidis fleeing Islamist militants in northern Iraq. Karen DeYoung of The Washington Post joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss how the rationale for U.S. military assistance has shifted, and the events that have pushed the U.S. to its tipping point.
    Original Air Date: August 7, 2014

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