Tuesday, February 18, 2014

  • Colo. women take aim at hunger with their cameras
    What does hunger look like in America? In Colorado, a diverse group of women who receive food assistance benefits are chronicling their personal experiences through photography. The NewsHour’s Mary Jo Brooks takes a closer look at their work, which has been exhibited at coffee shops, libraries and the state capitol.
    Original Air Date: February 18, 2014
  • Can garment factories pay a living wage and still compete?
    At $3 an hour, the workers at the Alta Gracia garment factory in the Dominican Republic are earning enough to feed a family of five. But after three years, this new, living wage-based business model has yet to turn a profit as global competition has pushed thousands of jobs to lower-cost countries. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports.
    Original Air Date: February 18, 2014
  • How ‘microtargeting’ works in political advertising
    What you watch, read, buy and listen to online can tell political campaigns whether it’s worth their time and money to woo your vote. Gwen Ifill talks to Ken Goldstein of the University of San Francisco and Eitan Hersh of Yale University to learn more about how our digital footprints are being used in the evolution of political advertising.
    Original Air Date: February 18, 2014
  • Challenging the value of high SAT scores
    As high school students gear up to take the SAT or ACT as part of the college application process, a new study claims that these standardized test scores don’t predict academic success as well as grade point average. William Hiss, the former dean of admissions at Bates College and lead author of the paper, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss why some institutions have dropped them as requirements.
    Original Air Date: February 18, 2014
  • Yuna Kim hopes to land second Olympic gold medal
    Ice skating, one of the most anticipated Winter Olympic sports, is taking center stage in Sochi. Americans Meryl Davis and Charlie White won gold in ice dancing, and the women’s figure skating competition is next on deck. Jeffrey Brown talks to Christine Brennan of ABC News for an update on Olympic winners, plus the detainment of two members of the punk band Pussy Riot.
    Original Air Date: February 18, 2014
  • Is Ukraine spinning out of control?
    The deadly violence and mayhem gripping Kiev signals an escalation in the more than two months of protests against the pro-Russia Ukrainian government.
    Original Air Date: February 18, 2014
  • Ukraine unrest explodes into violence and fire
    In our news wrap Tuesday, more than a dozen people were killed in Ukraine’s capital city Kiev, as thousands of police attacked thousands of anti-government protesters, who have been demanding closer ties with the West. Meanwhile, in Iraq, a string of car bombings left 49 people dead and 90 wounded.
    Original Air Date: February 18, 2014

Monday, February 17, 2014

  • What does it take to be a U.S. ambassador?
    Gaffes made by a fresh crop of ambassadorial nominees—several of them donors—have raised questions about Obama’s selection process. Obama, according to the American Foreign Service Association, has the highest proportion of political picks since Ronald Reagan. Gwen Ifill talks to former Foreign Service officer Nicholas Burns and Walter Russell Mead of The American Interest.
    Original Air Date: February 17, 2014
  • N.C. coal ash spill raises questions about regulation
    In early February more than 50,000 tons of coal ash -- which contains arsenic and other dangerous metals -- leaked from a containment pond into the Dan River in Eden, N.C. Michael Biesecker of the Associated Press joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the disaster and how the spill raises more questions about water safety and the regulators who oversee U.S. industry.
    Original Air Date: February 17, 2014
  • Arkansas’ Medicaid expansion alternative faces crucial vote
    In Arkansas, an alternative to the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion uses federal dollars to purchase private health plans for low-income residents who fall in a coverage gap. But now, as other states consider following suit, the Arkansas law, known as the “private option,” could end unless it is renewed by state lawmakers. Hari Sreenivasan reports.
    Original Air Date: February 17, 2014
  • Florida murder case adds to debate over race, self-defense
    In 2012, Michael Dunn, 47, a white Florida man, shot and killed unarmed Jordan Davis, 17, in what he called self-defense. Now, the case has been fueling the continuing debate over racism in trial, as Dunn has only been convicted of attempted murder. Gwen Ifill talks to the Advancement Project’s Judith Browne Dianis and David Weinstein of Clarke Silverglate.
    Original Air Date: February 17, 2014
  • Can the U.S. compel global collaboration on climate change?
    The global approach to addressing climate change has shifted from putting the onus on wealthy countries, to recognizing that big, fast-growing developing countries must also play a big part in reducing emissions. Judy Woodruff talks to Andrew Steer of the World Resources Institute and Scott Barrett of Columbia University about ways countries might work together in the fight against global warming.
    Original Air Date: February 17, 2014

Sunday, February 16, 2014

  • Called 'Presidents' Day,' but really Washington's birthday
    Under a federal law passed in 1968, the third Monday of February was officially designated as “Washington’s birthday.” No mention at all of honest Abe.
    Original Air Date: February 16, 2014
  • Kerry talks climate change during Asia trip
    Climate change discussions grab a top spot on U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry's agenda during his current diplomatic mission in Asia.
    Original Air Date: February 16, 2014
  • What’s behind the nation’s prescription drug shortage?
    The Government Accountability Office has issued a report detailing serious and growing drug shortages in the United States. Sabrina Tavernise of the New York Times joins Hari Sreenivasan from Washington to detail some of the reasons behind the shortfall.
    Original Air Date: February 16, 2014

Saturday, February 15, 2014

  • Companies are scaling back on matching 401(k) contributions
    Major companies are getting attention for scaling back on matching contributions to their employees' 401(k) plans. Hari Sreenivasan talks with Lauren Young, Money Editor for Thomson Reuters, about a story that has major implications for American workers planning for their retirement.
    Original Air Date: February 15, 2014
  • Vote deals blow to United Auto Workers in Tennessee
    Workers at a Volkswagen plant in Tennessee voted to reject what would have been United Auto Workers’ first successful organization of workers at a foreign automaker in the South. Jim Efstathiou of Bloomberg News speaks with Hari Sreenivasan about the significance of the vote.
    Original Air Date: February 15, 2014
  • Mobile phone usage explodes in Africa, spurring innovation
    A drive through Kenya’s bustling capital of Nairobi reveals a nation in love -- with the mobile phone. Across the African continent, improvements in mobile phone technology and greater access to the internet are spurring new innovations in the tech sector. Special correspondent Martin Seemungal reports from Kenya, the East African nation leading the trend.
    Original Air Date: February 15, 2014

Friday, February 14, 2014

  • Historic drought strains California’s towns and farms
    California is in bad shape water-wise. Despite some relief in early February, the rainy season is half over and reservoirs are still far below capacity, putting the state's agricultural production in jeopardy. Special correspondent Spencer Michels visits Sonoma County, a region known for its dairies, winemaking and breweries, to learn how communities are preparing for their worst-case scenarios.
    Original Air Date: February 14, 2014
  • Philadelphia’s Mayor Nutter on fighting poverty
    In Philadelphia, more than a quarter of all residents live below the poverty level, the highest rate among U.S. cities its size or larger. In our series on the growing divide between the rich and poor, Judy Woodruff talks to Mayor Michael Nutter about the complex, intergenerational factors that fuel poverty and what his city’s designation as a “Promise Zone” will mean for combating inequality.
    Original Air Date: February 14, 2014
  • At Sochi Olympics, ‘no big news’ has been good news
    Halfway through Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, the spotlight is shining on the athletes and the games rather than disruptions or security problems. Judy Woodruff talks to Christine Brennan of USA Today and ABC News about some surprising disappointments and hopeful prospects for the American team, as well as the way Russia’s Soviet history has sometimes surfaced thus far.
    Original Air Date: February 14, 2014
  • Extreme winter weather causes widespread economic disruption
    The latest round of storms in the South and Northeast may be over, but places that have spent much of the winter digging out or bundling up are also feeling an economic bite. Mark Zandi of Moody’s Analytics joins Jeffrey Brown to discuss how cold, snow and serious drought have disrupted employment, retailers, housing and automakers, all still recovering from the recession.
    Original Air Date: February 14, 2014
  • Shields and Brooks on the debt limit drama
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the politics behind the debt limit increase, the outlook for legislation on fighting poverty and new enrollment numbers for the Affordable Care Act.
    Original Air Date: February 14, 2014

Thursday, February 13, 2014

  • Trendlines: ‘Syria After Geneva 2’
    In the first Trendlines web special, a joint production of the PBS NewsHour and Al-Monitor, columnists Semih Idiz in Ankara, Turkey, Daoud Kuttab in Amman, Jordan, and Vitaly Naumkin in Moscow, along with the University of Oklahoma’s Joshua Landis, discuss the diplomatic effort to resolve the Syria crisis and how it’s impacting surrounding countries.
    Original Air Date: February 13, 2014
  • Sen. Tim Scott on offering more education options
    Judy Woodruff talks to Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., in another conversation in our series on income inequality, about his personal experience growing up in a single-parent home, expanding educational opportunities for disadvantaged children, the impact of the Affordable Care Act on workers and the debate on raising the minimum wage.
    Original Air Date: February 13, 2014
  • ‘Second machine age’ will require more human creativity
    Robotic technology is increasingly infiltrating our everyday world, and as robots become more capable of human labor, people will likely have to develop new skills for new jobs. Economics correspondent Paul Solman talks to Erik Brynjolfsson and Andy McAfee, who argue in their new book, "The Second Machine Age," that we are facing a radical new industrial revolution.
    Original Air Date: February 13, 2014
  • VW union vote spurs backlash by Tenn. politicians
    In Chattanooga, Tenn., workers at a Volkswagen plant are voting to decide whether to join the United Auto Workers union. While VW has remained neutral, state politicians and Republican Sen. Bob Corker have vocally opposed the union option. Jeffrey Brown gets views from Vincent Vernuccio of the Mackinac Center for Public Policy and Harley Shaiken of the University of California, Berkeley.
    Original Air Date: February 13, 2014
  • How will regulators see the Comcast-Time Warner deal?
    Telecom company Comcast is making a bid to buy the media giant Time Warner for $45 billion. If approved, Comcast will extend its geographic reach and control nearly 30 percent of all paid cable subscribers in the United States. Gwen Ifill learns more about the motivation behind the deal and possible changes for consumers from Edmund Lee of Bloomberg News.
    Original Air Date: February 13, 2014

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