Thursday, September 1, 2011

  • Impact Irene: White River Jct. and Hartford, VT
    For more on this story go to www.pbs.newshour.org. New Hampshire Public Radio reporter Elaine Grant reports from White River Jct. and Hartford Vermont on the flooding damage and how residents and businesses are fairing in the wake of Hurricane Irene.
    Original Air Date: September 1, 2011
  • Impact Irene: White River Jct. and Hartford, VT
    For more on this story go to www.pbs.newshour.org. New Hampshire Public Radio reporter Elaine Grant reports from White River Jct. and Hartford Vermont on the flooding damage and how residents and businesses are fairing in the wake of Hurricane Irene.
    Original Air Date: September 1, 2011
  • If A Tree Falls: A Story of the Earth Liberation
    IF A TREE FALLS: A STORY OF THE EARTH LIBERATION FRONT is the remarkable story of the group's rise and fall, told through the transformation and radicalization of one of its members, Daniel McGowan.
    Original Air Date: September 1, 2011
  • Film Chronicles Rise and Fall of Eco-Terrorist Cell
    On Thursday's NewsHour, we will feature an excerpt of the film "If a Tree Falls: A Story of the Earth Liberation Front," which looks at the radical environmental group through the transformation of one of its members, Daniel McGowan.
    Original Air Date: September 1, 2011

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

  • Honor Roll for August 31, 2011
    A silent tribute to U.S. soldiers killed while on duty in Iraq and Afghanistan.
    Original Air Date: August 31, 2011
  • Marijuana Farming Is Lucrative Business in California, but Who's Profiting?
    Last year, local and federal authorities seized some 7 million illegally grown marijuana plants in California. The Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED investigate who and what are behind the spike in the state's lucrative marijuana-farming business.
    Original Air Date: August 31, 2011
  • Worst Drought in Texas History Ravages Crops, Livestock
    Texas is caught in the grip of a devastating heat wave that has created the worst year of drought in the state's history. Gwen Ifill discusses the extreme conditions and their toll on crops, livestock and homes with NPR correspondent Wade Goodwyn.
    Original Air Date: August 31, 2011
  • DOJ Makes 'Audacious' Move to Block $39B AT&T, T-Mobile Merger
    The Department of Justice filed suit Wednesday to block the proposed $39 billion merger between AT&T and T-Mobile, which would create the largest wireless company in the country. Ray Suarez discusses the Obama administration's "unprecedented" move to block the deal with The Washington Post's Cecilia Kang.
    Original Air Date: August 31, 2011
  • 10 Years After 9/11, How Safe Is the U.S. From Terror Attacks?
    As the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks approaches, the state of U.S. security is under scrutiny. Jeffrey Brown discusses how far national security has -- and has not -- improved with 9/11 Commission Chairmen Lee Hamilton and Tom Kean.
    Original Air Date: August 31, 2011
  • Flood Waters Still Wreak Havoc in Northeast as Costs Mount
    More New Jersey residents evacuated their homes on Wednesday as flood waters from Hurricane Irene continued to ravage parts of the northeast. Jeffrey Brown reports on the rescue, recovery and clean up efforts.
    Original Air Date: August 31, 2011

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

  • Poet, Activist Ernesto Cardenal Explores Cosmos, Humanity in Verse
    Ernesto Cardenal, one of Latin America's most-renowned, but also controversial, poets and political activists, has shifted his recent work to reflect on humanity's connection to nature and relationship to the universe. Ray Suarez speaks with the poet about his life and writing.
    Original Air Date: August 30, 2011
  • Real-Life Thriller Explores al-Qaida Triple Agent's CIA Infiltration, Bombing
    In the real-life thriller, "The Triple Agent: The al-Qaeda Mole Who Infiltrated the CIA," author Joby Warrick examines the unlikely story of an operative who infiltrated the CIA and detonated a suicide bomb at a U.S. base in Afghanistan. Margaret Warner discusses the spy story with Warrick.
    Original Air Date: August 30, 2011
  • In Brazil, Women's Changing Roles, Attitudes Leading to Smaller Families
    Despite having the most Catholics in the world, 80 percent of Brazilian women of childbearing age are using some form of artificial contraception. In partnership with National Geographic Magazine, special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro examines the declining fertility rate, which has dropped to just 1.9 children per woman.
    Original Air Date: August 30, 2011
  • Millions of Distressed Properties Stuck in 'Shaky' U.S. Housing Market
    The troubled U.S. housing market got some good news Tuesday with word that prices in four major cities are on the rise, but a full recovery still appears to be a long way off. Jeffrey Brown discusses why home sales remain "tepid" with Harvard Business School's Nicolas Retsinas and Inside Mortgage Finance's Guy Cecala.
    Original Air Date: August 30, 2011
  • National Guard Airlifts Supplies to Vermont Towns Isolated by Irene's Flooding
    The National Guard airlifted food and supplies to dozens of Vermont towns on Tuesday, after Hurricane Irene sent rainwater surging down hills and mountainsides, washing out bridges and roads. Gwen Ifill discusses relief efforts with Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt.
    Original Air Date: August 30, 2011
  • Poet Ernesto Cardenal Reads His Work
    Ernesto Cardenal's recent work reflects on humanity's connection to nature and relationship to the universe.
    Original Air Date: August 30, 2011
  • '30 Mosques' Highlights Muslim Americans Across the Country
    Aman Ali and Bassam Tariq visited 30 mosques in 30 states, starting in Alaska and ending Tuesday in New York City. Each day they wrote a blog highlighting the diverse people they meet and the mosques they prayed in. They spoke with Hari Sreenivasan about their experiences.
    Original Air Date: August 30, 2011

Monday, August 29, 2011

  • Drug Shortages Force Tough Choices for Patients, Doctors
    More than 180 critical generic drugs are in short supply across the United States. Betty Ann Bowser reports on how shortfalls of key medications are creating problems for doctors and patients alike.
    Original Air Date: August 29, 2011
  • Monday, August 29, 2011
    Tonight on the program, cleanup crews pick up the pieces after Hurricane Irene left many Eastern states to face heavy flooding from the weekend's storm. Also, Margaret Warner talks to a reporter in Tripoli as reports emerge that Moammar Gadhafi's family has fled to Algeria, and we look at the controversy surrounding the Tar Sands pipeline. Finally, we examine what new data says about marriage.
    Original Air Date: August 29, 2011
  • News Wrap: Stocks Boosted by July Spending Numbers, Irene's Smaller Cost
    In other news Monday, Wall Street rallied on relief that Hurricane Irene caused less damage than originally feared and word that consumer spending rose in July by the most in five months. Also, President Obama nominated Alan Krueger to chair his Council of Economic Advisers.
    Original Air Date: August 29, 2011
  • Hurricane Irene's Cost May Hit $7B as Pricey East Coast Cleanup Begins
    Hurricane Irene's death toll reached at least 38 Monday as cleanup crews from North Carolina to New England continued to pick up after the storm amid ongoing flooding. Gwen Ifill discusses the storm's impact and the cost of the government's multiple disaster relief efforts with Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano.
    Original Air Date: August 29, 2011
  • Tar Sands Pipeline Plan Renews Energy vs. Environment Debate
    A proposed oil pipeline will stretch from Alberta, Canada, to refineries in Texas. Jeffrey Brown discusses the debate surrounding the Keystone XL pipeline with two experts.
    Original Air Date: August 29, 2011
  • What Does Data Reveal About the Geography of Marriage?
    A recent wave of data offers new insights into the geography of marriage and about the institution itself. Ray Suarez talks to analysts.
    Original Air Date: August 29, 2011
  • Gadhafi's Family Flees, but Hunt Remains for Libyan Leader
    As Libyan rebels shift their hunt for Moammar Gadhafi toward his hometown of Sirte on Monday, the leader's wife, daughter and two sons fled to neighboring Algeria. Margaret Warner discusses the rebels' latest efforts with The Washington Post's Simon Denyer.
    Original Air Date: August 29, 2011
  • Emergency Departments Struggle With Growing Drug Shortages
    The number of medications on the Food and Drug Administration's shortage list keeps growing. And while calcium chloride and potassium phosphate aren't drug names the average American would recognize, they're critical to patients visiting the emergency room every day.
    Original Air Date: August 29, 2011
  • Weekly Poem: 'All I Know About Love' by Lynnell Edwards
    Lynnell Edwards is the author of two collections of poetry, both from Red Hen Press: "The Highwayman's Wife" (2007) and "The Farmer's Daughter" (2003). She teaches at the University of Louisville.
    Original Air Date: August 29, 2011

Friday, August 26, 2011

  • MLK Memorial Emerges From Stone on National Mall, After Decades of Planning
    This weekend's dedication ceremony for the new memorial honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. has been postponed due to Hurricane Irene, but the public has already had an opportunity to reflect on the newest monument in Washington. Hari Sreenivasan reports.
    Original Air Date: August 26, 2011
  • Shields and Brooks on GOP's Zeitgeist, Whether Obama Gets Credit for Libya
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks weigh in on the week's top political news, including Texas Gov. Rick Perry's leapfrog over Mitt Romney in the national polls and whether President Obama deserves -- or is getting -- credit for helping topple Moammar Gadhafi's regime.
    Original Air Date: August 26, 2011

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