Wednesday, October 19, 2011

  • Do Large Banks' Troubles Show They're Too Big to Manage?
    Goldman Sachs announced a $428 million quarterly loss Tuesday, just its second loss since going public in 1999. Jeffrey Brown discusses the state, the future and regulation of large American banks with banking industry consultant Bert Ely and Simon Johnson, former chief economist of the International Monetary Fund.
    Original Air Date: October 19, 2011
  • In Brazil's Slums, Economic Inequality Tackled With Technology
    Rio de Janeiro's gleaming skyline befits a world economic power, but it is not far from violent, impoverished slums. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on one man's efforts to tackle Brazil's wealth inequality by providing poor people access to technology.
    Original Air Date: October 19, 2011
  • Social Security Recipients to Get 3.6% Boost, but How Much Will it Help?
    Starting in January, 55 million Social Security recipients will get a 3.6 percent bump in benefits. Margret Warner discusses the cost-of-living adjustment, which is tied to inflation, with Robert Reischauer of the Urban Institute.
    Original Air Date: October 19, 2011
  • Heavyweights Romney, Perry Spar in Latest Debate; 9-9-9 Plan Draws More Scrutiny
    The clashes came early and often Tuesday night as seven Republican presidential contenders squared off in Las Vegas. Gwen Ifill recaps the eighth GOP debate and checks the accuracy of candidate statements with Political Editor David Chalian and Glenn Kessler of The Washington Post.
    Original Air Date: October 19, 2011
  • Greece Faces 'a Make or Break Moment' as Austerity Protests Swell
    Riots erupted Wednesday in Athens, Greece, as tens of thousands protested another round of tax hikes and spending cuts. Judy Woodruff gets an update on the riots, concerns over the nation's future job market and the physical toll that stress is taking on some Greeks from reporter John Psaropoulos in Athens.
    Original Air Date: October 19, 2011
  • The Ballad of Diamond Jim - Annotated
    Noted bank skeptic and MIT economist Simon Johnson, late of the IMF, explains the story behind the story of Diamond Jim - the tuneful tale of a would-be banker who travels to Charlotte, N.C., to meet up with a mogul of modern-day finance, "Diamond Jim."
    Original Air Date: October 19, 2011

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

  • U.S. Civil Court System Needs Major Overhaul, New Book Declares
    In "Rebuilding Justice: Civil Courts in Jeopardy and Why You Should Care," co-authors Rebecca Love Kourlis and Dirk Olin examine problems and potential improvements in the U.S. civil court system, where 30 million cases are filed every year. Ray Suarez and Kourlis discuss the authors' call for a major overhaul of the system.
    Original Air Date: October 18, 2011
  • Vaccine Could Become 'Another Very Powerful Weapon' to Fight Malaria
    An experimental vaccine against malaria, an oftentimes-deadly disease that half the world is exposed to, is still in trials, but it could be in production by 2015. Jeffrey Brown discusses the potential impact of the vaccine with Glaxo Smithkline CEO Andrew Witty.
    Original Air Date: October 18, 2011
  • How Bright Is Solar Power's Future in a Post-Solyndra America?
    After the Obama administration-embraced solar-panel company Solyndra collapsed and defaulted on its government-backed loans, the surging U.S. solar industry is suddenly worried that the subsidies it receives -- tax credits and loans guarantees -- could dry up in the face of opposition from conservatives. Spencer Michels reports.
    Original Air Date: October 18, 2011
  • Amid Chaos, 'Libya Needs to Start on a Process of State Building'
    As Libya struggles for stability, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Tuesday urged its transitional government to commit to a democratic path forward without reprisals. Margret Warner discusses what has and hasn't been accomplished in creating a new state with Dartmouth College's Dirk Vandewalle, appearing from London.
    Original Air Date: October 18, 2011
  • Will Shalit-Palestinian Swap Change Long-Term Middle East Peace Strategy?
    A prisoner swap between Israel and Hamas on Tuesday freed more than 1,000 prisoners, including Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit. Gwen Ifill discusses the swap and its possible effects on longer-term Middle East peace strategy with Daniel Levy of the New American Foundation and Hussein Ibish of the American Task Force on Palestine.
    Original Air Date: October 18, 2011
  • Frontline's 'Lost in Detention' Examines Immigration Enforcement
    For more on this story go to http://www.pbs.org/newshour/A year long investigation by Frontline and the American University Investigative Reporting Workshop examines the current U.S. immigration enforcement system and uncovers hidden stories of abuse in the U.S. detention system.Hari Sreenivasan recently interviewed Frontline Correspondent Maria Hinjosa.
    Original Air Date: October 18, 2011

Monday, October 17, 2011

  • Obama, Civil Rights Leaders Formally Dedicate MLK Memorial
    Tens of thousands of people gathered Sunday in Washington to formally dedicate the National Mall's newest destination, a memorial honoring the life of civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr. Gwen Ifill reports.
    Original Air Date: October 17, 2011
  • Cocaine: How 'Miracle Drug' Nearly Destroyed Sigmund Freud, William Halsted
    In "An Anatomy of Addiction," medical historian Howard Markel details the cocaine addictions of Sigmund Freud and William Halsted, both medical revolutionaries of the 1880s. Health correspondent Betty Ann Bowser discusses cocaine addiction's early history in medicine with Markel.
    Original Air Date: October 17, 2011
  • FCC's Genachowski: New Alerts Aim to Limit 'Bill Shock' for Wireless Users
    Most cell phone users purchase a plan with limits on how long they can talk, text or browse the Web each month, but it can be tough to track usage. Ray Suarez discusses new consumer-friendly rules for wireless companies to send their customers over-usage alerts with Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski.
    Original Air Date: October 17, 2011
  • Outside Super PACs Poised to Dominate 2012 Spending
    When it comes to financing presidential campaigns, the money raised by individual candidates may count less in the 2012 election than past contests. Gwen Ifill discusses the potential might of the new super PACs with Tara Malloy of the Campaign Legal Center and the Heritage Foundation's Hans von Spakovsky.
    Original Air Date: October 17, 2011
  • Will Occupy Wall Street Movement Stand Apart From U.S. Party Politics?
    As economic protests spread globally, world leaders took note of the movements' possible implications. Jeffrey Brown discusses the causes, strengths and weaknesses of the growing protests in the U.S. and abroad with Yes! Magazine's Sarah van Gelder, Josh Barro of the Manhattan Institute and Yale University's Beverly Gage.
    Original Air Date: October 17, 2011
  • California Dream Act Offers Undocumented Students Path to Higher Education
    For more on this story, go to http://www.pbs.org/newshour/On October 8, 2011 California Governor Jerry Brown signed Bill AB131 into law enabling undocumented students who meet to have access to state public funds for higher education. Leslie Berestein Rojas of the Multi-American blog, a project of KPCC, talks with Hari Sreenivasan about the effects of the new legislation.
    Original Air Date: October 17, 2011
  • Weekly Poem: 'See You Tomorrow Night' by Terri Witek
    Terri Witek is the Art & Melissa Sullivan Chair in Creative Writing at Stetson University. She is the author of "The Shipwreck Dress," (2008, Florida Book Award Winner), "Carnal World" (2006), "Fools and Crows" (2003), and "Courting Couples" (2000 Center for Book Arts Prize).
    Original Air Date: October 17, 2011

Friday, October 14, 2011

  • The Doubleheader: Cain, Occupy, Detroit, 4S
    David Brooks and Mark Shields join Hari Sreenivasan to discuss Herman Cain's dramatic rise in the polls, the ongoing Occupy Wall Street movement's cross-country reach and the success of Detroit's baseball and football teams.
    Original Air Date: October 14, 2011
  • Kansas City Hopes to Boost Economy, Energy with Moshe Safdie's Arts Center
    Jeffrey Brown speaks with Moshe Safdie, architect of the Kauffman Center in Kansas, about the moral purpose of architecture and the need for a building to reflect the cultural essence of its location.
    Original Air Date: October 14, 2011
  • Shields, Brooks on Cain's Poll Surge, 'Hunger for Something Else' in GOP Race
    Columnists Mark Shields and David Brooks weigh in on the week's top political news, including Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain's recent surge in the polls, how much religion is factoring into the GOP race for Mitt Romney and others, the lack of long-term economic fixes, and Texas Gov. Rick Perry's teetering support.
    Original Air Date: October 14, 2011
  • Mother Nature, Changing Infrastructure Fuel Worst Floods in Half-Century
    The worst floods in half a century have devastated Thailand's central plains, and is now sending waters toward Bangkok's nearly 10 million residents. Judy Woodruff discusses the latest developments with the United Nations' Kamal Kishore and Simmons College's Catharine Dalpino.
    Original Air Date: October 14, 2011
  • Ohio Voters Weigh Repeal of Controversial Collective-Bargaining Law
    A controversial new Ohio law aimed at restricting the collective-bargaining rights of 360,000 unionized public employees has led to a major political fight and a voter referendum in this battleground state. Gwen Ifill reports on the issue that has both sides spending millions to mobilize their voters for an off-year election.
    Original Air Date: October 14, 2011
  • Jobs Dominate Political Agenda for Obama, Republican Rivals
    Jobs dominated the political agenda for President Obama and his Republican rivals on Friday, as everyone seemed to agree on the need to do something but there was little agreement on what to do. Ray Suarez reports.
    Original Air Date: October 14, 2011
  • Canadian Brass Performs at Opening of Moshe Safdie's Kauffman Center
    For more on this story, go to http://www.pbs.org/newshour/art/blog/ As Jeffrey Brown reported on the PBS NewsHour, Kansas City recently celebrated the opening of the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts. On opening night, the Canadian Brass performed a fanfare composed specifically for the event. Here is that piece, along with scenes of the new building.
    Original Air Date: October 14, 2011
  • Architect Moshe Safdie Uplifts the Skyline and Spirit of Kansas City
    For more on this storry, go to: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/art/blog/Jeffrey Brown speaks to Moshe Safdie, architect of the Kauffman Center in Kansas, about the moral purpose of architecture and the need for a building to reflect the cultural essence of its location.
    Original Air Date: October 14, 2011
  • Chinese Housing Bubble: A Troubling Update from Beijing
    In this latest dispatch from China, stand-up economist Yoram Bauman explores the possibility of a Beijing housing bubble. His conclusion? Beijing prices and its glut of vacant apartment buildings seem as fishy as the mechanics of the hot water heater in his apartment. Wait til you see how it's hooked up.
    Original Air Date: October 14, 2011

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