Monday, February 27, 2012

  • The Healing Power of Music
    An unconventional approach to recovery and coping, music therapy is a field of medicine capturing new attention due to its role in helping Gabrielle Giffords recover from a gunshot. Correspondent Spencer Michels reports on the versatility of music in a medical setting, but the difficulty of quantifying its effectiveness.
    Original Air Date: February 27, 2012
  • In Russia, No Romantic Notion of Revolution Before Election
    Russian protesters formed a human chain in Moscow Sunday to register their opposition toward Prime Minister Vladimir Putin and his bid to become president again. Margaret Warner reports on the upcoming election as reports emerge of an alleged assassination plot and pressure mounts on Russia to change its policy toward Syria.
    Original Air Date: February 27, 2012
  • If Romney Loses Michigan, 'All Bets Are Off'
    Ahead of crucial primaries in Michigan and Arizona, GOP hopeful Mitt Romney focused on federal spending while Rick Santorum said religion should play a wider role in public policy. Gwen Ifill discusses the state of the GOP primary battle with USA Today's Susan Page and The Rothenberg Political Report's Stuart Rothenberg.
    Original Air Date: February 27, 2012
  • How Widespread Are Anti-American Feelings in Afghanistan?
    Nine Afghans were killed Monday after a suicide car bomber targeted a NATO air base, ramming its entrance. Judy Woodruff and guests discuss the latest violence amid ongoing anti-American protests over Quran burnings at a U.S. air base.
    Original Air Date: February 27, 2012
  • Political Checklist: Watching Arizona and Michigan
    The NewsHour Political Checklist returns as senior correspondents Judy Woodruff and Gwen Ifill talk with political editor Christina Bellantoni about what to watch during Tuesday's primaries in Arizona and Michigan.
    Original Air Date: February 27, 2012
  • Weekly Poem: Susan Briante Reads 'Other Denver Economies'
    Susan Briante is the author of "Pioneers in the Study of Motion" (Ahsahta Press, 2007) and "Utopia Minus" (Ahsahta Press, 2011). She teaches at the University of Texas-Dallas.
    Original Air Date: February 27, 2012

Friday, February 24, 2012

  • NY Arts Program Brings 'Harmony' to Low-Income Students
    Serving mostly low-income children in New York City, an innovative music education program called Harmony provides free instruments and daily music lessons to children in third through sixth grades. Correspondent John Merrow reports on an arts program changing lives in public schools, based on a system developed in Venezuela.
    Original Air Date: February 24, 2012
  • Shields, Brooks on Syria and Romney, Santorum Infighting
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks discuss the week's top political news including Secretary Clinton's harsh words on Syria, Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum's political infighting and a coming primary in Michigan.
    Original Air Date: February 24, 2012
  • Standard of Proof in Question at Rutgers Suicide Trial
    Opening statements began Friday in the trial of Dharun Ravi, a Rutgers student charged with using a webcam to spy on his roommate, who later killed himself, during a physical encounter with another man. Ray Suarez, The Associated Press' Geoff Mulvihill and Slate's Emily Bazelon discuss the trial's standard of proof.
    Original Air Date: February 24, 2012
  • What Can 'Friends of Syria' Do to Help Halt Killings?
    As officials from more than 60 nations on Friday called on Syria's government to stop killings, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton stressed that if the regime refused the delivery of humanitarian supplies, "it will have even more blood on its hands." Jeffrey Brown and guests discuss what can be done to halt further bloodshed.
    Original Air Date: February 24, 2012
  • The Doubleheader: Super PACs and Sports News
    Political analysts Mark Shields and David Brooks mull the role of super PACs in the presidential race, Major League Baseball player Ryan Braun winning an appeal after testing positive for a banned substance, and their own winning of a civility award.
    Original Air Date: February 24, 2012
  • Conversation: Jazz Musician Jason Moran
    Jason Moran has made a name for himself at an early age as a jazz pianist and composer. And that name is growing to a wider public; last year, Moran was awarded a MacArthur genius fellowship, and he was recently made the artistic adviser for jazz at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington D.C.
    Original Air Date: February 24, 2012

Thursday, February 23, 2012

  • Miners' Families 'Encouraged' by Prosecutors' Moves
    West Virginia mine safety officials on Thursday issued 253 violations against Massey Energy in their final report on the 2010 Upper Big Branch mining disaster that killed 29 men. Jeffrey Brown and NPR's Howard Berkes discuss the findings and prosecution efforts to reach higher into the ranks of Massey's upper management.
    Original Air Date: February 23, 2012
  • Va. Proposal Mandating Ultrasound Before Abortion Debated
    Amid rising criticism, Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell changed his stance on a bill that would require women to have a transvaginal ultrasound before an abortion, noting that an abdominal ultrasound would be more appropriate. Judy Woodruff and guests discuss Virginia's proposed law and nationwide efforts to curb access to abortions.
    Original Air Date: February 23, 2012
  • Cyber Schools Gain Popularity, but Quality Questions Persist
    Full-time public cyber schools are now an option in 30 states, allowing some 250,000 students in kindergarten through 12th grade to press a button to raise their hand and message their teachers. John Tulenko of Learning Matters Television reports from Pennsylvania where the demand for online charter schools is high.
    Original Air Date: February 23, 2012
  • Who Was Behind Latest Coordinated Attacks Across Iraq?
    A spree of shootings and deadly explosions across Iraq killed at least 55 people and wounded more than 225 Thursday. The Interior Ministry and a member of the Baghdad City Council blamed al-Qaida. Jeffrey Brown discusses the implications amid Iraq's shifting political structure with Jane Arraf of Al Jazeera English.
    Original Air Date: February 23, 2012
  • Romney, Santorum Clash Over Conservative Values, Earmarks
    GOP contenders Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum traded repeated blows at a debate Wednesday night in Mesa, Ariz., criticizing each other on conservative beliefs, use of federal earmarks and education reform. Judy Woodruff reports on the Republican candidates' campaign tactics ahead of primaries in Arizona and Michigan.
    Original Air Date: February 23, 2012
  • America at the Ballot Box: Technology Through the Years
    NewsHour's science correspondent Miles O'Brien interviews political historian and curator William L. Bird, who takes us on a trip through time and technology to show us snapshots of various voting systems in America and the problems they encountered.
    Original Air Date: February 23, 2012
  • The Financial Answer Man: Carl Richards Takes Your Questions
    A while back we asked you to submit your most pressing personal finance questions so I could put them to Carl Richards, the sketching, New York Times-blogging, financial literacy-teaching author of the excellent money manual, The Behavior Gap. The questions poured in. So Thursday we're unveiling a new miniseries here on Making Sen$e: Carl and Paul on Personal Finance.
    Original Air Date: February 23, 2012

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

  • African-American Museum an 'Opportunity for Understanding'
    Ground was broken Wednesday on the National Mall for the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture, set to open in 2015. Jeffrey Brown discusses the pivotal moment in the long, $500 million effort to showcase the stories and experiences of black Americans with journalist and author Isabel Wilkerson.
    Original Air Date: February 22, 2012
  • Supreme Court Hears Free Speech Case Over Stolen Valor Act
    Falsely claiming a Congressional Medal of Honor could land you in jail according to the Stolen Valor Act, a federal law making it a crime to lie about a military decoration. Margaret Warner and Marcia Coyle discuss a case involving that law under review by the Supreme Court plus a case involving ownership of Montana riverbeds.
    Original Air Date: February 22, 2012
  • 2 Journalists Killed in Syria Amid Escalating Violence
    As Syria's government intensified its assault on the city of Homs Wednesday, activists said more than 70 people had been killed -- including an American reporter working for the British Sunday Times and a French photojournalist. Tim Ewart and Jonathan Miller of Independent Television News report.
    Original Air Date: February 22, 2012
  • Sizing up Romney, Santorum Campaigns in Arizona, Michigan
    GOP contenders campaigned Wednesday in Arizona as they prepared for the season's 20th presidential debate. Gwen Ifill reports from Phoenix. Then Judy Woodruff discusses the coming Michigan primary with Micheline Maynard of the public media project Changing Gears and Bill Ballenger of the Inside Michigan Politics newsletter.
    Original Air Date: February 22, 2012
  • Will Quran-Burning Investigation Quell Anger in Afghanistan?
    Hundreds of angry protesters voiced their anger at NATO and American forces Wednesday in Afghanistan after some U.S. troops were seen putting Qurans in a burn pit for trash. Jeffrey Brown and Heidi Vogt of The Associated Press in Kabul discuss the spreading anger and the implications for U.S.-Afghan relations.
    Original Air Date: February 22, 2012

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

  • Roger Rosenblatt Reflects on Love, Grief, Kayaks
    Author Roger Rosenblatt considers grief, solace, solitude and love in the wake of his daughter's death in his new book "Kayak Morning: Reflections on Love, Grief and Small Boats." Jeffrey Brown and Rosenblatt discuss a morning out on the water and a journey through grief.
    Original Air Date: February 21, 2012
  • Thailand Grapples With Tensions Between Muslims, Buddhists
    At least 5,000 people have been killed since 2004 in Thailand's three southern provinces amid ongoing mistrust between minority Muslims and majority Buddhists. Kira Kaye reports on efforts to resolve tensions as part of the new Fault Lines of Faith series, produced in partnership with the Bureau for International Reporting.
    Original Air Date: February 21, 2012
  • Can Pro-Obama Super PAC Match GOP Groups' Financial Might?
    January financial disclosures exposed the power of unaffiliated super PACs funds this election season. Margaret Warner and John Dunbar of the Center for Public Integrity's iWatch News discuss the fundraising reports, the $22 million raised and some of the big spenders helping these groups help their preferred candidates.
    Original Air Date: February 21, 2012
  • After Second Bailout, Is Greece Still Likely to Default?
    Eurozone finance ministers on Tuesday granted Greece its second bailout, a $172 billion package aimed at helping the country avoid default. Jeffrey Brown discusses the longer-term concerns of austerity measures and growth with Georgetown University's Scheherazade Rehman and Joao Vale de Almeida, the EU's ambassador to the U.S.
    Original Air Date: February 21, 2012

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