Friday, April 26, 2013

  • Shields and Brooks on Bush Legacy and NFL Draft
    Mark Shields, David Brooks and Hari Sreenivasan are back in another episode of the Doubleheader where they tackle the sport of politics and the politics of sport. Today, our captains of civility discuss the legacy of President Bush and yesterday's dedication of his presidential library in Dallas. Then they discuss what seemed a linemen's lineup last night at the NFL draft.
    Original Air Date: April 26, 2013
  • Congress Passes Bill to End Furloughs at the FAA
    To address air traffic slowdowns and passenger frustration over flight delays and cancellations due to sequester-induced staff shortages, the House of Representatives passed a bill to end furloughs at the Federal Aviation Administration. Margaret Warner talks with Alan Levin of Bloomberg News.
    Original Air Date: April 26, 2013
  • Options for U.S. if Syria Chemical Weapon Use Is Confirmed
    How should the U.S. act if it confirms that the Syrian regime has used chemical weapons? Jeffrey Brown moderates a debate on different approaches between Kori Schake, research fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution, and David Cortright, director of the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies.
    Original Air Date: April 26, 2013
  • Judy Woodruff on Day of the Reagan Assassination Attempt
    More than 32 years ago, NewsHour correspondent Judy Woodruff traveled with the press pool to cover President Ronald Reagan speak at the Washington Hilton Hotel. That day, the president survived a bullet to the chest, while his secretary Jim Brady, was shot in the head, permanently disabled. In the wake of recent mass shootings across the country, the policy debate on guns has been renewed.
    Original Air Date: April 26, 2013
  • Meissner: A third of U.S. Foreigners Here Illegally
    The Migration Policy Institute's Doris Meissner says that a third of the U.S. foreign-born population is in the country illegally.
    Original Air Date: April 26, 2013
  • Actor Mark Wahlberg encourages VA students to graduate
    Successful rapper-turned-actor Mark Wahlberg visited T.C. Williams High School in Alexandria, VA and urged students to do what he didn't - graduate from high school. Wahlberg has started an online recovery program to earn his diploma.
    Original Air Date: April 26, 2013

Thursday, April 25, 2013

  • Gun Control Fight Feels Familiar to Advocates of Another Era
    The defeat of a bipartisan effort to expand background checks for gun buyers was cheered by gun rights advocates and denounced by the president and families of gun victims. Judy Woodruff takes a behind-the-scenes look at the fight over gun control and the decades-long evolution of lobbying tactics on both sides of the debate.
    Original Air Date: April 25, 2013
  • Living Presidents Gather to Dedicate George W. Bush Library
    The dedication of the George W. Bush Presidential Library was attended by its namesake and the four other living presidents. Jeffrey Brown discusses presidential legacy with Ellen Fitzpatrick of the University of New Hampshire, University of Texas at Austin's H.W. Brands and presidential historian Michael Beschloss.
    Original Air Date: April 25, 2013
  • U.S. Believes Syrian Regime Has Used Chemical Weapons
    The Obama administration says it believes the Syrian government has used chemical weapons but requires more credible evidence. Margaret Warner talks to New York Times White House correspondent Mark Lander and Amy Smithson of the Monterey Institute of International Studies.
    Original Air Date: April 25, 2013
  • Tsarnaev Brothers Planned Times Square Attack After Boston
    The brothers suspected in the Boston bombings apparently told the FBI they planned to set off additional explosives in New York City's Times Square. Judy Woodruff talks to Dina Temple-Raston, NPR's counterterrorism correspondent, about what U.S. intelligence knew about Tamerlan Tsarnaev in the years before the attack on Boston.
    Original Air Date: April 25, 2013
  • Sarah Brady and David Keene
    In interviews with the Brady Campaign's Sarah Brady and the National Rifle Association's David Keene, NewsHour's Judy Woodruff explores where the gun debate heads next.
    Original Air Date: April 25, 2013
  • President Bill Clinton at the Bush Library Dedication
    President Clinton spoke candidly about a president's attempts to rewrite history through their libraries, his relationship with President Bush, and his thoughts on President Bush's paintings.
    Original Air Date: April 25, 2013
  • George W. Bush Speaks at the Dedication of His Library
    President Bush spoke of his experiences in office and the resolve he witnessed in ordinary and heroic Americans.
    Original Air Date: April 25, 2013
  • Watch all 5 Living Presidents Arrive at the Dedication
    Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George H.W. Bush, and Jimmy Carter and their wives all attended the opening of the newest presidential library. First ladies Michelle Obama, Laura Bush, Hillary Clinton, Barbara Bush, and Rosalynn Carter first took the stage.
    Original Air Date: April 25, 2013
  • Former INS Chief Says U.S. Needs Foreign Workers
    Doris Meissner, director of the Immigration Policy program at the Migration Policy Institute says that both foreign-born works with lower skills as well as those with advance degrees complement American workers and that allowing these workers to come to the U.S. is key to America maintaining its dominance in the world.
    Original Air Date: April 25, 2013

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

  • Should U.S. Have Monopoly on Food Sent Abroad to Aid?
    As the USAID announces a new budget proposal that reallocates food aid funding from American farmers to more global sources, Margaret Warner gets views from Ellen Levinson of the Alliance for Global Food Security and former USAID administrator Andrew Natsios.
    Original Air Date: April 24, 2013
  • Heavy April Showers Inundate Midwest States With Flooding
    Steady downpours across the Midwest have swollen rivers, creeks and streams beyond their banks. The Illinois River reached a 70-year high and so far four people in three states have died. Ray Suarez reports on how communities have been coping with rising waters, heavy rain and increasing damage.
    Original Air Date: April 24, 2013
  • Search for Sender of Ricin Letters Turns Up Odd Twists
    Federal investigators searched a home in Tupelo, Miss., in the hunt for who sent politicians letters tainted with ricin. Gwen Ifill talks to Kimberly Kindy of The Washington Post and Marilyn Thompson of Reuters about strange twists in the investigation, including conflict between a karate teacher and an Elvis impersonator
    Original Air Date: April 24, 2013
  • In Wake of Boston Bombings, a Fund to Help Victims, Families
    In the hours following the attacks on the Boston Marathon, city officials received calls from individuals asking how they could help. The One Fund was set up to compensate the injured and the families of those killed. Jeffrey Brown talks to administrator Ken Feinberg about dispensing the money and managing victims' expectations.
    Original Air Date: April 24, 2013
  • Mining Online History for What May Have Radicalized Brothers
    In Boston, a memorial service honored a police officer killed during the manhunt for the Tsarnaev brothers, while new information was released about the bombing suspects. Judy Woodruff talks with Jerrold M. Post of the George Washington University and Jessica Stern of Harvard University about how people turn to radical violence.
    Original Air Date: April 24, 2013
  • Creating a New Planet for Math and Science: Super STEM
    Third grade math teacher Jerriel Hall at Leckie Elementary School in Washington, D.C. transforms his classroom into another planet to help his students review for their upcoming standardized test. The idea is to create a new, engaging and entertaining setting to bring the lessons to life.
    Original Air Date: April 24, 2013
  • Doris Meissner, director of the U.S. Immigration Policy Prog
    Doris Meissner, director of the U.S. Immigration Policy Program at the Migration Policy Institute says the proposed W-Visa program for lower skilled workers is something that the U.S. has never offered to foreign-born workers.
    Original Air Date: April 24, 2013
  • Soul Singer Charles Bradley's Greatest Stories Is His Songs
    At age 64, Bradley is just getting started. He recently released his second album, "Victim of Love," and has embarked on his first world tour. Now the world will get to hear The Screaming Eagle of Soul. They'll get to see his moves - he's been dancing since he was 4 years old. They'll get to witness his spirit - his performance is coated in his faith, "Can I go to church!"
    Original Air Date: April 24, 2013

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

  • Book Examines the Blurring Line Between Soldiers and Spies
    How did the U.S. intelligence community embrace a more operational role in the days after September 11? Margaret Warner talks to New York Times national security correspondent Mark Mazzetti, who explores that transition in his new book, "The Way of the Knife: The CIA, a Secret Army, and a War at the End of the Earth."
    Original Air Date: April 23, 2013
  • Pervasive Preference for Boys Prevails Among Indian Parents
    As part of the NewsHour's Agents for Change series, special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro returns to a story he first reported on 12 years ago about the skewed sex ratio of children born in India. Baby boys are seen as more favorable for both economic and cultural reasons, a perception activists are trying to combat.
    Original Air Date: April 23, 2013
  • Senate Retirements Could Be Crucial in Political Battle
    Montana's Max Baucus is the eighth senator to announce he won't seek re-election. How will these retirements shape the fight for seats and the political landscape? Gwen Ifill gets analysis from Stuart Rothenberg of the Rothenberg Political Report and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report.
    Original Air Date: April 23, 2013
  • Boston Marathon Bombings Stir Up Lessons for Public Safety
    The bombings at the Boston Marathons stirred up questions about public safety and security at events with large crowds. Jeffrey Brown examines the safety lessons learned with Jim Davis, executive director of the Colorado Department of Safety, and Ed Cannon, former assistant chief of the New York City Police Department.
    Original Air Date: April 23, 2013
  • Bombing Suspect Alleges Attack Was Self-Motivated
    Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev remains hospitalized with limited ability to communicate. But the 19-year-old has reportedly acknowledged that he acted alone with his brother out of anti-American sentiment. Judy Woodruff gets an update from Devlin Barrett of the Wall Street Journal.
    Original Air Date: April 23, 2013

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