Monday, June 4, 2012

  • Political Checklist: Watching Wisconsin
    In this week's Political Checklist, Political Editor Christina Bellantoni chatted with senior correspondent Gwen Ifill and special guest Jeff Brown about the historic recall election in Wisconsin. Jeff outlined the energy he saw coming from people on both sides of the election, and Gwen noted the contest is being influenced by outside donations.
    Original Air Date: June 4, 2012
  • "Movement Retraining" Can Reduce Knee Pain
    Science Nation video on how changing the way you move can reduce knee pain.
    Original Air Date: June 4, 2012
  • Weekly Poem by Natalie Diaz
    Natalie Diaz reads "Abecedarian Requiring Further Examination of Anglikan-Seraphym Subjugation of a Wild Indian Rezervation, a poem from her first collection, "When My Brother Was an Aztec."
    Original Air Date: June 4, 2012
  • Louisiana Fishermen Pioneer Floating Architecture
    For more on this story go to http://www.pbs.org/newshour/topic/climate-change/ The fishing community on Old River in Louisiana is in a flood-prone area. In order to maintain their homes, many of the residents have mobilized to devise an innovative solution: turning their homes into floating rafts. Also known as "amphibious," the houses usually stay grounded, but float when the water rises.
    Original Air Date: June 4, 2012

Friday, June 1, 2012

  • Doubleheader: Shields and Brooks on LeBron, John Edwards
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks tackle LeBron James and John Edwards in the weekly Doubleheader.
    Original Air Date: June 1, 2012
  • Writer Mario Vargas Llosa on the Importance of Literature
    Peruvian writer Mario Vargas Llosa, one of the world's leading writers, speaks with Jeffrey Brown about his new book and how he folds history and contemporary politics into his writing.
    Original Air Date: June 1, 2012
  • Jury Starts Deliberation Over Concealing Pedophile Priests
    A Philadelphia jury began deliberating Friday in a landmark criminal case against Monsignor William Lynn, the first Catholic Church figure to be targeted not for molesting children, but for concealing the abuse. Margaret Warner talks with John Martin of the Philadelphia Inquirer about the emotional trial.
    Original Air Date: June 1, 2012
  • In Louisiana, Rising Seas Threaten Native Americans' Land
    Native Americans' tribal lands along the Louisiana coast are washing away as sea levels rise and marshes sink. Part of our Coping with Climate Change series, Hari Sreenivasan reports from Isle de Jean Charles, a community that is slowly disappearing into the sea.
    Original Air Date: June 1, 2012
  • Shields, Brooks on Economic Picture, Cyber Attacks
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks discuss the week's top political news with Judy Woodruff including May's lackluster jobs report, the White House decision to rev up cyber attacks against Iran plus Bill Clinton's and Donald Trump's roles as surrogates for the Obama and Romney campaigns.
    Original Air Date: June 1, 2012
  • Lackluster Jobs Report Highlights Economic 'Fear Factor'
    A new jobs report released Friday showed the worst single month for job growth in a year, pushing the U.S. unemployment rate up to 8.2 percent. Margaret Warner explores what's behind the weaker jobs picture with Daniel Gross of Yahoo! Finance and Diane Swonk of Mesirow Financial.
    Original Air Date: June 1, 2012
  • Gov. McDonnell Showcases Va. Economy as Romney Considers VP
    The Republican governor of Virginia is highlighting that his state has the lowest unemployment rate in the Southeast as he campaigns for presumptive GOP nominee Mitt Romney. Bob McDonnell is considered a potential pick to be Romney's running mate. The NewsHour recently trailed McDonnell on his jobs tour.
    Original Air Date: June 1, 2012
  • Viewing the Venus Transit: What's the Safest Way?
    On Tuesday, June 5, as the sun sets in North America, the rare astronomical event known as the Transit of Venus will be visible for the last time in over 100 years. University of Virginia Associate Professor of Astronomy Edward Murphy gives an overview of several safe ways to view Tuesday's transit of Venus in front of the sun without harming your eyes in the process.
    Original Air Date: June 1, 2012
  • Native Lands Wash Away as Sea Levels Rise
    In collaboration with Louisiana Public Broadcasting, the PBS NewsHour examines the vanishing coastline of Louisiana and the vulnerability of its native tribes to rising sea levels. This report is part of our series Coping with Climate Change. For more on this story go to http://www.pbs.org/newshour/topic/climate-change/
    Original Air Date: June 1, 2012

Thursday, May 31, 2012

  • Decorum, Skullduggery and Rivalries of the Presidents Club
    Time magazine editors Nancy Gibbs and Michael Duffy explore how current and former American presidents interact with one another in their new book, "The Presidents Club: Inside the World's Most Exclusive Fraternity." The authors spoke with Gwen Ifill about cross-party mentoring and the infighting that can occur.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2012
  • Sizing Up Which Campaigns Are #Winning in Twitter Influence
    As part of an ongoing series on how candidates use social media this election season, Margaret Warner and journalists Lauren Ashburn and Howard Kurtz of Daily-Download.com discuss how influential the Obama and Romney presidential campaigns are on Twitter. They also examine John Edwards' standing in the Twittersphere.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2012
  • Student Loan Debt: To Pay or Not to Pay?
    In his second report this week on student lending, economics correspondent Paul Solman examines the challenges that indebted college graduates face and the debate over whether to forgive some or all of their loan burden.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2012
  • Bloomberg Could Buy the World Soda, but He'd Make It a Small
    New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced Thursday his aim to ban the sale of large, sugary drinks at restaurants, movie theaters, sports venues and street carts to help fight obesity. Judy Woodruff speaks with New York Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas Farley and Andrew Moesel of the New York State Restaurant Association.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2012
  • News Wrap: Obama Presses European Leaders Over Reforms
    In other news Thursday, President Obama pressed European leaders to take action on their currency system amidst financial and political upheaval across the continent. Also, a federal appeals court in Boston declared that the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act discriminates against gay married couples.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2012
  • John Edwards Walks On Six Counts Of Campaign Fraud
    Former Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards was acquitted Thursday on a count of accepting illegal campaign contributions to hide his mistress. A federal jury in North Carolina deadlocked on five other counts, and the judge declared a mistrial on those. Ray Suarez talks to the AP's Michael Biesecker about the case.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2012
  • Watch John Edwards' Speech After Verdict
    A jury found Edwards not guilty on one of six counts of campaign finance fraud against him. The judge declared a mistrial has been declared on the five other counts. The not-guilty verdict was declared on the third count, which charged that he had accepted and received illegal campaign contributions in 2008 from heiress Rachel Mellon.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2012
  • Why Do Alabama Students Drop Out?
    Teens from Birmingham, Alabama investigate why some of their peers choose to drop out of school.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2012
  • What Role Does Fashion Play in Politics?
    Student reporters from Fort Mill High School in South Carolina examine how fashion affects the way voters see candidates.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2012
  • Doris Naquin on her Sinking Island Home
    Doris Naquin describes the changes in Isle de Jean Charles over her lifetime.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2012

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

  • Remembering Doc Watson, Who Moved Guitar to Center Stage
    Music legend Doc Watson died Tuesday at age 89. While he didn't record an album until his 40s, his guitar-playing and singing helped define and influence the sound of folk and bluegrass music for several generations. Jeffrey Brown and Katy Daley, host of WAMU's "Bluegrass Country" discuss the blind guitar legend's legacy.
    Original Air Date: May 30, 2012
  • Dolores Huerta Calls Herself 'a Born-Again Feminist'
    In the 1960s, Dolores Huerta organized in the fields -- spearheading a national boycott of grapes and lettuce, and making decent pay and working conditions a reality for thousands of farmers. After receiving a Medal of Freedom Tuesday at the White House, Huerta spoke with Ray Suarez.
    Original Air Date: May 30, 2012
  • Student Loans: More Debt, More Defaults, More Problems
    Americans owe $1 trillion in student loan debt. How did that happen, and what's the impact on the nation's economy? Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports as part of his Making Sen$e of financial news series.
    Original Air Date: May 30, 2012
  • Flame: Trying to Unravel the Mystery of Spying Malware
    Reportedly capable of taking computer screenshots, logging keystrokes and even listening in on office conversations, malware known as "Flame" is grabbing international attention after appearances in Iran and elsewhere in the Middle East. Jeffrey Brown and guests discuss the potential risks of a "Flame" outbreak.
    Original Air Date: May 30, 2012
  • How Do You Spend $1 Billion in a White House Race Anyway?
    Mitt Romney's win Tuesday in Texas effectively sets up a two-man contest for the White House. As President Obama and his Republican challenger look to corral votes and money, Judy Woodruff, The Washington Post's Tom Hamburger and Politico's Kenneth Vogel discuss the role of campaign finance and super PACs this election season.
    Original Air Date: May 30, 2012

VIDEO SEARCH