Thursday, November 17, 2011

  • Police, 'Occupiers' Clash on Day of Action in Several Cities
    The Occupy Wall Street movement marked the end of its second month with marches and demonstrations in several cities, but hundreds of protesters were arrested after clashing with police. Judy Woodruff reports.
    Original Air Date: November 17, 2011
  • How Do You Protect Against a Tsunami?
    Researchers in Japan are working to find ways to limit the most-catastrophic damage from tsunamis. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien reports.
    Original Air Date: November 17, 2011
  • Amid Solyndra Turmoil, How Involved Should Government Be in Energy Research?
    Should the government help spur or back certain kinds of energy research? Jeffrey Brown discusses the political storm over the government's backing of the now-bankrupt solar panel manufacturer Solyndra with Eileen Claussen of the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions and Robert Bryce of The Manhattan Institute.
    Original Air Date: November 17, 2011
  • Idaho Man Charged With Obama Assassination Attempt Led 'Sort of a Troubled Life'
    Gunshots that hit the White House on Friday evening eventually led to the arrest of Oscar Ramiro Ortega-Hernandez, a 21-year-old man from Idaho, on a charge of an attempted assassination of President Obama. Margret Warner discusses the developing story with Charlie Savage of The New York Times.
    Original Air Date: November 17, 2011
  • Drooling Electrons, Thermodynamics and Beta Decay...In Verse
    Mala Radhakrishnan, assistant professor at Wellesley College, has recently released a book on poetry chemistry, called "Atomic Romances, Molecular Dances." Her aim is to use poetry, but also easy-to-understand analogies to teach about thermodynamics, kinetics and molecular reactions.
    Original Air Date: November 17, 2011
  • Radioactive Dating Game
    Mala Radhakrishnan reads her poem, "The Radioactive Dating Game."
    Original Air Date: November 17, 2011
    November 17, 2011

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

  • Congress Honors 4 Astronauts With Highest Civilian Honor
    Four astronauts were awarded the nation's highest civilian honor on Wednesday: the Congressional Gold Medal. Ray Suarez reports.
    Original Air Date: November 16, 2011
  • 'Patriotic Millionaires' Lobby Congress for Higher Taxes on Rich
    Members of Patriotic Millionaires for Fiscal Strength visited Capitol Hill Wednesday, lobbying Congress for higher taxes on the rich. Jeffrey Brown discuses the group's goals with member Garrett Gruener, who founded Ask.com.
    Original Air Date: November 16, 2011
  • Berkeley Students, 'Occupy Oakland' Protesters Join Forces
    Protesters and University of California, Berkeley students are shifting strategies as city officials put more pressure on the ranks of Occupy Oakland. Correspondent Spencer Michels reports.
    Original Air Date: November 16, 2011
  • Program Brings Dental Care to Remote Alaskans, but Some Dentists Are Skeptical
    A program to train dental therapists to perform basic care in rural Alaska has been met with both praise and skepticism. Health correspondent Betty Ann Bowser continues her series of reports on dental costs, coverage and access for Americans.
    Original Air Date: November 16, 2011
  • Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac Executives' Bonuses Draw Rebuke From Lawmakers
    The compensation practices at two government-controlled mortgage giants came under heavy fire on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. Margret Warner discusses what accounts for executive bonuses at Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac with Politico's Josh Boak and The Wall Street Journal's Nick Timiraos.
    Original Air Date: November 16, 2011
  • What Does U.S. Military Deployment Mean for Asia-Pacific?
    President Obama announced Wednesday that more than 2,000 U.S. troops will head to Australia, but he stopped short of saying the move was meant as a message to China. Ray Suarez explores what the move means for regional politics with Jeffrey Bader of The Brookings Institution and John Higley of the University of Texas at Austin.
    Original Air Date: November 16, 2011
  • NewsHour Connect: The New Farm Bill Fast Tracked by SuperCommittee
    Every 5 years Congress passes a bundle of legislation related to food and agriculture, the last of which was passed in 2008. It usually takes at least a year for stakeholders to voice their concerns and then for congress to ultimately enact the bill. This year, however, the Farm Bill process is on the fast track. Hari Sreenivasan checked in with Peggy Lowe of Harvest Public Media for more.
    Original Air Date: November 16, 2011
  • At Tipping Point of Dental Pain, A Mother Makes Tough Choices
    A "quick trip" to the dentist usually means a two-hour flight across southern Alaska for Eva Malvich. But that pales in comparison to the other sacrifices she's made to get some relief from the pounding pain in her mouth. Several weeks ago, the 42-year-old mother of three also quit her job of 19 years and cashed out her retirement savings.
    Original Air Date: November 16, 2011

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

  • 'Midnight Rising' Explores Life, Legend of John Brown
    Author Tony Horwitz tells the story of John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry in the new book, "Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War." Jeffrey Brown and Horwitz discuss the life and legend of John Brown.
    Original Air Date: November 15, 2011
  • NBA Labor Battle Continues, Threatening Entire Season
    The entire NBA season is on the brink as talks between players and owners, aimed at ending the lockout, break down. Ray Suarez discusses what's at stake with Ian Thomsen of Sport Illustrated.
    Original Air Date: November 15, 2011
  • Millions of Americans Face Life Without Dental Care
    The lack of access to dental care is a problem that affects millions of Americans. Health correspondent Betty Ann Bowser reports.
    Original Air Date: November 15, 2011
  • Editor: Sandusky 'Probably Did Himself More Harm Than Good' in Costas Interview
    In a startling move Monday, Jerry Sandusky, the former Penn State defensive coordinator accused of sexually abusing children, defended himself in a telephone interview with Bob Costas on NBC. Margret Warner discusses the scandal's continuing fallout with David Newhouse, editor of The Patriot-News in Harrisburg, Pa.
    Original Air Date: November 15, 2011
  • Congressional Deficit Panel Gridlock Persists as Deadline Nears
    Republicans and Democrats on Capitol Hill still seemed miles apart on a deficit-reduction agreement on Tuesday, with just eight days to go before a self-mandated deadline. Congressional correspondent Kwame Holman reports.
    Original Air Date: November 15, 2011
  • What's Next for Occupy Wall Street Protests After Judge Bars Camping in Park?
    New York City police routed anti-Wall Street protesters from their campsite early Tuesday, and hours later, city officials won a court ruling that backed up their move. Jeffrey Brown discusses the legal arguments involved in the New York protests with attorneys Daniel Alterman and James Copland.
    Original Air Date: November 15, 2011
  • Tony Horwitz Reads From 'Midnight Rising'
    Tony Horwitz is the author of "Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War."
    Original Air Date: November 15, 2011

Monday, November 14, 2011

  • Harry Belafonte Reflects on Life as a Singer, Actor and Activist
    Harry Belafonte is not only a musical icon, but also a lifelong political and social activist. Gwen Ifill talks with Belafonte about his life as a singer, actor and civil rights activist.
    Original Air Date: November 14, 2011
  • As Arab Pressure Intensifies on Syria, What's Next for Assad?
    The Arab League voted overwhelmingly on Saturday to suspend Syria's membership in an effort to further pressure President Bashar al Assad to stop the crackdown on dissidents. Margaret Warner discusses the growing frustration with Syria with The Atlantic Council's Michele Dunne and University of Maryland's Shibley Telhami.
    Original Air Date: November 14, 2011
  • Somali Refugees Flee to Ethiopia to Escape Famine, Violence
    Kenyan troops have been drawn into the civil war in Somalia between the government and al-Shabab militants as desperate refugees flee to Ethiopia to escape violence and famine. Special Correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from a refugee camp near Dolo, on the Ethiopian border with Somalia.
    Original Air Date: November 14, 2011
  • Deficit Super Committee Stuck in Stalemate as Deadline Nears
    After more than three months of work, the congressional panel charged with finding ways to cut the nation's budget deficit seems to be stuck in neutral. Judy Woodruff discusses the deadlock with super committee member Rep. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md.
    Original Air Date: November 14, 2011
  • Health Reform Law to Face Constitutional Test in Supreme Court
    On Monday, the Supreme Court agreed to hear arguments next spring on the constitutionality of the health care reform law. Jeffrey Brown discusses the political and legal implications with The National Law Journal's Marcia Coyle and NPR's Julie Rovner.
    Original Air Date: November 14, 2011
  • World's Largest Dam Removal Aims to Restore River Ecosystem
    The world's biggest dam removal project and the second largest environmental restoration project in U.S. history is in progress on the Elwha River on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington state.
    Original Air Date: November 14, 2011
  • Why a Lesson in Money Plus Math Equals Financial Stability
    Sheila Bair, known for her tenacity and contrarian tenure as chairwoman of the FDIC, has a message she wants everyone to learn:Don't buy an inflatable moose head for your wall.
    Original Air Date: November 14, 2011

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