Monday, June 24, 2013

  • Supreme Court Sends Texas Affirmative Action Case Back
    According to the Supreme Court, the University of Texas may continue using race as factor in some college admissions, but also found a lower federal court used the wrong standard to dismiss a challenge to the policy. Kwame Holman reports on the court's ruling and Jeffrey Brown talks with the National Law Journal's Marcia Coyle.
    Original Air Date: June 24, 2013
  • Weekly Poem: 'I Go Back to May 1937'
    Actor John Lithgow reads the poem "I Go Back to May 1937," by Pulitzer Prize winner Sharon Olds.
    Original Air Date: June 24, 2013

Friday, June 21, 2013

  • Doubleheader LIVE with Shields and Brooks
    Hari Sreenivasan sat down with Mark Shields and David Brooks to bring you a LIVE take on the Sport of Politics and the Politics of Sports. The duo also fielded viewer questions about Lebron James, swaying each others' political views, and favorite songs, among others.
    Original Air Date: June 21, 2013
  • A Search for Understanding While Hanging on to Faith
    Author and journalist Jeff Chu joins Ray Suarez to talk about his personal journey coming to terms with being Christian and gay. In his book, "Does Jesus Really Love Me?", Chu discusses the choices made by gay Christians trying to reconcile their lives, identities and faith.
    Original Air Date: June 21, 2013
  • Shields and Brooks on Farm Bill Failure, Obama in Berlin
    New York Times columnist David Brooks and syndicated columnist Mark Shields analyze the week's top political news with Jeffrey Brown, including the failure of the farm bill in the House, the progress of and prospects for immigration reform and President Barack Obama's speech about nuclear arms in Berlin.
    Original Air Date: June 21, 2013
  • 'Pernicious' Effects of Economic Inequality
    It's been said that money is the root of all evil. Does money make people more likely to lie, cheat and steal? Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports on new research from the University of California, Berkeley about how wealth and inequality affects us psychologically.
    Original Air Date: June 21, 2013
  • Should Immigrants Be Required to Learn English?
    A provision of the proposed immigration legislation would require immigrants to prove they're learning English before they can become permanent residents. Ray Suarez gets debate on the issue from Georgetown University's Barbara Mujica and Max Sevillia of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials.
    Original Air Date: June 21, 2013
  • In Brazil, Enormous Stadiums Stand as Symbols of Frustration
    At least a million Brazilian protesters flocked to the streets overnight. Margaret Warner talks with Matthew Cowley, Sao Paulo bureau chief for The Wall Street Journal, about how worries about an economic slowdown and Brazil's upcoming hosting of major sports events have helped fuel the massive public protests.
    Original Air Date: June 21, 2013
  • The End for Exodus International
    On June 19, Exodus International, a Christian ministry that has long sought to curb same-sex attraction announced it would shut down and president Alan Chambers apologized to the gay community. Ray Suarez talks to Jeff Chu, author of "Does Jesus Really Love Me?" about the organization's actions and what it means for the Christian community going forward.
    Original Air Date: June 21, 2013
  • Why We Did 'New Adventures for Older Workers'
    Political editor Christina Bellantoni interviews data producer Elizabeth Shell on the PBS NewsHour's new in-depth interactive, "New Adventures for Older Workers" on the lessons learned, pitfalls, whys and hows of the project.
    Original Air Date: June 21, 2013
  • Musicians Don't Let Their Babies Grow Up Without Health Care
    Country, rock, punk, folk, soul -- regardless of the genre, two things once united most musicians in Austin, Texas -- the "Live Music Capitol of the World" -- lack of health insurance and wages averaging less than $16,000 per year. A serious illness or accident often killed the music faster than anything else. Then came the Health Alliance for Austin Musicians.
    Original Air Date: June 21, 2013
  • Conversation: Colum McCann, Author of 'TransAtlantic'
    Frederick Douglass traveling through Ireland in 1845 to stir up support for his abolitionist cause. The first non-stop flight across the Atlantic in 1919. Sen. George Mitchell in 1998 trying to forge a peace treaty in Northern Ireland. Those actual people and events are at the heart of a the new novel "TransAtlantic." Author Colum McCann talks with Jeffrey Brown about his latest book.
    Original Air Date: June 21, 2013
  • Novelist Colum McCann Reads an Excerpt From 'TransAtlantic'
    In his latest book, Colum McCann reimagines and retells three historical journeys from the United States to Ireland. Watch McCann read an excerpt from 'TransAtlantic.'
    Original Air Date: June 21, 2013

Thursday, June 20, 2013

  • This Year's Championships Are Games to Watch and Remember
    The NHL and NBA seasons have led up to dramatic and exciting endings. NPR's Mike Pesca joins Jeffrey Brown from Miami to discuss how the last-second shots and overtime goals have made 2013 NBA finals and the Stanley Cup games major sports moments to remember.
    Original Air Date: June 20, 2013
  • Finding the Connection Between Prosperity and Happiness
    Usually, as a country's GDP goes up, that nation's well-being tends to rise as well. But for the last 35 years as GDP has grown in the United States, Americans' average happiness hasn't increased. Economics correspondent Paul Solman talks to researchers about how they study the connection between money and happiness.
    Original Air Date: June 20, 2013
  • HPV Vaccine Cuts Number of Infections in Teen Girls by Half
    The prevalence of the most common STD -- and the leading cause of cervical cancer -- among teenage girls has been cut in half, thanks to the HPV vaccine. Margaret Warner talks with Dr. Anne Schuchat of the Centers for Disease Control for more on a new study.
    Original Air Date: June 20, 2013
  • Wall Street Feels Pain of China's Credit Crunch
    It was a bad day for global markets, whose stocks fell over worries about a credit crunch in China and comments by Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke that the fed may begin paring back stimulus efforts. Jeffrey Brown gets reactions from The Wall Street Journal's David Wessel and James Paulsen of Wells Capital Management.
    Original Air Date: June 20, 2013
  • News Wrap: U.S. House Fails to Pass Farm Bill
    In other news Thursday, the U.S. House of Representatives failed to pass a five-year, half-trillion dollar farm bill. The bill would have cut food stamps by $2 billion annually. Also, Afghan President Hamid Karzai has changed his mind and says he will participate in peace talks with the U.S. and the Taliban.
    Original Air Date: June 20, 2013
  • Senators Near Key Compromise on Beefed-Up Border Security
    A bipartisan group of senators have worked out a potentially critical compromise for the immigration reform bill. Reform supporters said they had met demands for greatly expanded policing of the border with Mexico. Ray Suarez talks with two lawmakers shaping the legislation: Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D., and Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M.
    Original Air Date: June 20, 2013
  • Money on the Mind
    In a series of startling studies, psychologists at the University of California at Berkeley have found that “upper-class individuals behave more unethically than lower-class individuals.” Ongoing research is trying to find out what it is about wealth — or lack of it — that makes people behave they way they do. Paul Solman reports as part of his Making Sen$e series.
    Original Air Date: June 20, 2013
    June 20, 2013
  • Can Money Buy Happiness?
    Although U.S. GDP has grown over the last 35 years, average happiness has not. According to researchers at the University of California at Berkeley, the reason may lie in growing economic inequality. Paul Solman reports as part of his Making Sen$e series.
    Original Air Date: June 20, 2013
    June 20, 2013

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

  • David Rothenberg Jams with the Cicadas
    David Rothenberg, professor of philosophy and music at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, takes his clarinet out to Ulster County Fairgrounds in New York to play music with the cicadas, which have emerged after 17 years underground. Their sounds are as musical as bird calls and whale songs, he says in his new book "Bug Music."
    Original Air Date: June 19, 2013
  • Frederick Douglass Statue Unveiled at the Capitol
    At the U.S. Capitol's Emancipation Hall, lawmakers honored the legacy and spirit of Frederick Douglass -- freed slave, abolitionist and human rights advocate -- with a new statue in his likeness. Ray Suarez offers excerpts from the ceremony.
    Original Air Date: June 19, 2013
  • A Call for New Commitment to the Humanities
    A new report by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences panel warns that the U.S. could lose its competitive edge in the liberal arts and social sciences. Jeffrey Brown talks with two members of the panel: actor and writer John Lithgow and Richard Brodhead, co-chair of the Commission on the Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Original Air Date: June 19, 2013
  • Sen. Tim Kaine on the Immigration Debate
    The Senate continues to work on a sweeping bill to overhaul the nation's immigration system, moving toward a final vote before the July 4 deadline. In a one-on-one conversation, Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., talks with Ray Suarez about his immigration bill priorities and working with the House on comprehensive reform.
    Original Air Date: June 19, 2013
  • Obama Calls for Dramatic Decrease in Nuclear Arms
    President Barack Obama said the U.S. could reduce its stockpile of long-range nuclear weapons by up to a third, and called upon Russia to make similar cuts. Margaret Warner gets reactions to Mr. Obama's call from former State and Defense Department official Eric Edelman and Joseph Cirincione of the Ploughshares Fund.
    Original Air Date: June 19, 2013
  • News Wrap: Federal Reserve Paints Brighter Picture
    In other news Wednesday, the Federal Reserve estimated unemployment will fall a little faster than expected in 2013 and 2014. Also, the Internal Revenue Service is in the spotlight again, this time for its plans to pay bonuses to employees despite a White House directive to stop those payments under automatic spending cuts.
    Original Air Date: June 19, 2013
  • Will Karzai's Reversal Impact Drive for Stability?
    A day after a breakthrough agreement on holding direct talks, Afghan President Hamid Karzai backed away from announced negotiations with the U.S. and the Taliban. Jeffrey Brown talks with The New York Times' Rob Nordland, from Doha, Qatar, for more detail on the decision and possible next moves.
    Original Air Date: June 19, 2013

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