Thursday, October 24, 2013

  • GOP can gain from 'adhering to principles,' says Gillespie
    Despite the political hit Republicans took from the shutdown, former GOP chair Ed Gillespie is optimistic his party can make headway on issues like immigration reform and entitlements, and win back the majority if they can reduce friction in their coalition. Gwen Ifill talks to Gillespie about the outlook for the next election.
    Original Air Date: October 24, 2013
  • Parents study how to improve college prospects for kids
    While their elementary school-aged kids are being taught the basics of reading and math, some parents are learning how to prioritize their prospects for higher education. The NewsHour's April Brown reports on the "Parent College" program that is working to improve graduation rates for underprivileged students in Los Angeles.
    Original Air Date: October 24, 2013
  • EPA chief on maintaining a 'diverse energy mix' for America
    In June, the Obama administration called for new pollution standards for power plants, and the new EPA administrator, Gina McCarthy, has followed through with a proposal for new rules. Ray Suarez reports on pushback from the coal industry, while Judy Woodruff talks to McCarthy about pollution and energy priorities.
    Original Air Date: October 24, 2013
  • Merkel: U.S. spying on friends is 'not acceptable'
    At a European Union summit, German Chancellor Angela Merkel characterized the reported American monitoring of her cellphone as a "severe breach of trust." Jeffrey Brown gets background from Margaret Warner and Luke Baker of Reuters about how European leaders are responding to U.S. spying allegations.
    Original Air Date: October 24, 2013
  • HealthCare.gov contractors warned of glitches before launch
    The contractors behind the development of HealthCare.gov testified before a House committee that they warned officials the insurance exchange site was not properly tested before it went live. Meanwhile the White House announced that insurance seekers will now have until March 31 to sign up for coverage. Hari Sreenivasan reports.
    Original Air Date: October 24, 2013
  • News Wrap: President Obama pushes immigration reform
    In our news wrap Thursday, President Obama urged Congress to focus on passing immigration reform. Also, two people have tested positive for polio in Syria in the first outbreak of the crippling disease there in 14 years.
    Original Air Date: October 24, 2013
  • EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy on climate change
    PBS NewsHour’s Judy Woodruff sits down with Environmental Protection Agency administrator Gina McCarthy to talk about how the agency plans to move forward with President Obama’s climate action plan. In the video above, she responds to the criticism of the agency and the president’s conflicts with Congress.
    Original Air Date: October 24, 2013
  • Obama makes push for 'common sense' immigration reform
    From the White House, President Barack Obama delivered a mid-morning speech Thursday calling on Congress to pass "common sense immigration reform."
    Original Air Date: October 24, 2013

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

  • 'President's Devotional', scriptures that inspired Obama
    As the former head of the Office of Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships under President Barack Obama, Joshua Dubois would seek and offer scripture to serve as inspiration in daily life and in the face of national tragedy. Gwen Ifill sits down with Dubois to discuss his collection, titled "The President's Devotional."
    Original Air Date: October 23, 2013
  • Shellfish made poisonous by toxic algae
    The Pacific Northwest is known for its seafood, but when algae blooms in coastal waters, it can release toxins that poison shellfish and the people who eat them. Katie Campbell of KCTS in Seattle reports on the growing prevalence and toxicity of that algae, and how scientists are studying a possible link to climate change.
    Original Air Date: October 23, 2013
  • Young Detroiters unlock their inner poets
    Detroit schools are turning their students into published poets with a little guidance from professional writers and a program called InsideOut. Jeffrey Brown reflects with U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey about visiting the Motor City middle-schoolers and the "sense of power" she witnessed as they found their voices.
    Original Air Date: October 23, 2013
  • Detroit bankruptcy eligibility case goes to trial
    The city of Detroit filed for bankruptcy in July, and now it must prove to a judge that the conditions necessitate that protection. But some pension funds, unions and retirees are fighting the filing. Jeffrey Brown gets an update from Matthew Dolan of The Wall Street Journal on Detroit's finances.
    Original Air Date: October 23, 2013
  • How will higher education evolve to be more affordable?
    A new report shows the cost of college is rising at a slower rate, but that does little good in easing the struggle for affordable higher education, with fewer funds available for student aid and household incomes at a plateau. What options do students face? Ray Suarez talks to Jeff Selingo of The Chronicle of Higher Education.
    Original Air Date: October 23, 2013
  • Will there be more complications to the health care website?
    The Obama administration has said it is making efforts to improve the health care website, but tech experts warn the problems are far from fixed. For more on what contributed to the flawed launch and the challenges ahead, Hari Sreenivasan speaks with John Engates of RackSpace and Bill Curtis of CAST Software.
    Original Air Date: October 23, 2013
  • White House launches 'tech surge' to boost capacity
    On their first day back in session since the shutdown, House members called out the faults of the health care online exchanges and called for needed fixes. Congressional correspondent Kwame Holman reports on efforts being made by the Obama administration to continue enrollment despite the site's technical troubles.
    Original Air Date: October 23, 2013
  • Elizabeth Becker's 'Overbooked' explores travel and tourism
    Elizabeth Becker talks about the wonders and woes of the ever-growing travel industry and how tourism transforms countries in her new book, 'Overbooked: The Exploding Business of Travel and Tourism."
    Original Air Date: October 23, 2013

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

  • Novelist Jonathan Lethem looks at American radicalism
    Set in the mid-20th century, Jonathan Lethem's novel "Dissident Gardens" explores the private lives of American communists and the "radical tradition" that has become part of the fabric of our nation. Jeffrey Brown talks to the author about his inspiration and the intersection of political ideology and personal experience.
    Original Air Date: October 22, 2013
  • Societal factors play into rise of drug-resistant bacteria
    Has the age of antibiotics come to an end? New strains of bacteria are on the rise, landing normally healthy people in the hospital with life-threatening, drug-resistant infections. Ray Suarez talks to David Hoffman, the journalist who led the investigation for Frontline's "Hunting the Nightmare Bacteria."
    Original Air Date: October 22, 2013
  • Changing relations with Mideast allies may affect U.S.
    Tensions between Saudi Arabia and the U.S. have arisen from "cumulative" disagreements on a variety of international issues. Jeffrey Brown speaks with chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner and former State Department analyst Graeme Bannerman about the history of the alliance and risks of a reduced U.S. role in the region.
    Original Air Date: October 22, 2013
  • Rep. Huelskamp: Tea party lost the battle, not the debate
    Rep. Tim Huelskamp, R-Kan., believes that Americans are disappointed with the "status quo" deal Congress passed to end the shutdown. Judy Woodruff talks to the congressman about Republican strategy and rhetoric, another conversation in our series on the future direction of the GOP.
    Original Air Date: October 22, 2013
  • Economists expect 'messier' jobs report for October
    Employment data for the month of September was finally released after being delayed for weeks by the shutdown. The numbers reflect a month of disappointing growth with little change in unemployment and fewer jobs created than expected. Economic correspondent Paul Solman looks at what it means for the nation's economic recovery.
    Original Air Date: October 22, 2013
  • Is U.S. transparent enough about civilian drone casualties?
    Two human rights groups claim that U.S. drone attacks targeting terrorists have killed dozens of innocent civilians abroad, despite promises from the president to limit strikes that cause unintended casualties. Mustafa Qadri of Amnesty International, the author of one report, and retired Maj. Gen. Charles Dunlap join Gwen Ifill.
    Original Air Date: October 22, 2013
  • Excerpt from FRONTLINE'S 'Hunting the Nightmare Bacteria'
    Watch an excerpt from FRONTLINE's documentary 'Hunting the Nightmare Bacteria," which airs on Tuesday, Oct. 22 on most PBS television stations.
    Original Air Date: October 22, 2013

Monday, October 21, 2013

  • Chinese citizens losing patience with air pollution
    China's tremendous growth has transformed the lives of its citizens but it has also come with a cost: significant air pollution. The major industrial city of Harbin shut down when smog levels reached record levels. Jeffrey Brown talks to Evan Osnos of The New Yorker about the ramifications of China's air quality problems.
    Original Air Date: October 21, 2013
  • Former Sen. Trent Lott: Republicans need a positive agenda
    Former Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott, R-Miss., believes that the tactics used by the Republicans during the shutdown were "not wise." Lott joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the future of the GOP, the importance of getting work done and what issues could help reunite the party, including spending, farming and energy policies.
    Original Air Date: October 21, 2013
  • Should individuals be accountable for the 2008 meltdown?
    JP Morgan Chase is close to striking a reported $13 billion settlement with the government over the sale of troubled mortgage securities. Gwen Ifill talks to Dennis Kelleher of Better Markets and Bert Ely, a banking consultant, for reaction on the penalty and how the government is seeking accountability for the 2008 crisis.
    Original Air Date: October 21, 2013
  • Detroit residents engage the community with signs of hope
    Detroit residents are hoping to breath new life into their communities, despite the city's filing for bankruptcy earlier this year. Neighborhoods are working to attract developers to rehab blighted buildings, create new jobs and assist would-be buyers and renters. Jeffrey Brown reports on the optimism driving their efforts.
    Original Air Date: October 21, 2013
  • What's next in nationwide struggle over same-sex marriage?
    Wedding bells rang for same-sex couples in New Jersey, after Gov. Chris Christie dropped his opposition and that state joined 14 others and the District of Columbia in officially allowing gay marriage. David Crary of the Associated Press joins Ray Suarez to discuss the legislative policies at work in these matrimonial matters.
    Original Air Date: October 21, 2013

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