Wednesday, April 18, 2012

  • How Obama, Romney Camps Are Courting Latino Voters
    President Obama and Mitt Romney are battling for support from voters in the nation's fastest-growing demographic: Latinos, who account for more than 16 percent of the population. Gwen Ifill discusses campaign efforts with Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., and Bettina Inclan, director of Hispanic outreach for the RNC.
    Original Air Date: April 18, 2012
  • Troop Photos With Dead Afghans: How It Affects U.S. Mission
    U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta condemned photos published Wednesday of soldiers posing with dead Afghan insurgents. Jeffrey Brown discusses how the latest in a series of U.S. humiliations might shape military efforts and U.S.-Afghan relations with The Washington Post's Craig Whitlock and Retired Army Col. Bob Killebrew.
    Original Air Date: April 18, 2012

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

  • AP's Reporting Pulitzer for NYPD Profiling Series
    First brought to light in an Associated Press series of reports, a post-9/11 surveillance program by the New York City Police Department on Muslim communities has raised calls for a federal probe. Jeffrey Brown and the AP's Adam Goldman discuss the series that was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting on Monday.
    Original Air Date: April 17, 2012
  • Space Shuttle Discovery Draws Eyes to Sky for Final Flight
    NASA's space shuttle Discovery captivated people in and around the nation's capital Tuesday as it flew piggy-back on a 747 over the Capitol en route on its last landing at Dulles International Airport. Gwen Ifill and Valerie Neal, a curator at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, discuss its future as a museum piece.
    Original Air Date: April 17, 2012
  • What's Ahead for Admitted Mass Killer Breivik?
    On trial for allegedly killing 77 people in last year's massacre in Norway, Anders Behring Breivik concluded a day of chilling testimony by telling the court "I would have done it again." Margaret Warner discusses the unique trial with Anders Tvegard, the U.S. correspondent for the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation.
    Original Air Date: April 17, 2012
  • U.S. Tax Reform: What Could, Should Be Done?
    With renewed talk of tax cuts and President Obama's "Buffett Rule," political maneuvering in Congress and on the campaign trail has turned toward the U.S. tax system. On this tax day, Jeffrey Brown discusses tax reform options with the Brookings Institution's Alice Rivlin and the Tax Policy Center's Donald Marron.
    Original Air Date: April 17, 2012
  • Tax Day Arrives Amid Debate Over Fairness
    Tax filing day this year brought protests and rallies across the country, both for tax cuts and tax fairness. While the issues intertwine, tax cuts and President Obama's "Buffett rule" push have become key points of contention in Congress and on the campaign trail. Gwen Ifill reports.
    Original Air Date: April 17, 2012
  • Miles O'Brien Reflects on Shuttle Program Shortcomings
    Space Shuttle Discovery hitched a ride Tuesday morning from Florida's Kennedy Space Center to Washington D.C.'s Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, where it will live out its final days. NewsHour Science correspondent Miles O'Brien reports on the event from Cape Canaveral. He reflects on what Discovery's final journey means for Florida and where the shuttle program fell short.
    Original Air Date: April 17, 2012
  • What Keeps Kids in School?
    Fort Mill High School teens investigate how their school is able to keep its students coming back.
    Original Air Date: April 17, 2012
  • Political Checklist: Indiana and the Veepstakes
    In this week's Political Checklist, political editor Christina Bellantoni chatted with senior correspondent Gwen Ifill about a red state that's slipped out of President Obama's grasp. We also chatted about those persistent veepstakes, and how we can't help but cover them even though it's a speculative game.
    Original Air Date: April 17, 2012

Monday, April 16, 2012

  • Pulitzer Prize Profile: The Inquirer's Public Service Award
    Announced Monday by Columbia University, The Philadelphia Inquirer won the Pulitzer Prize for public service for its "Assault on Learning" series that chronicled pervasive under-reported violence in the city's public schools. Jeffrey Brown and The Inquirer's Kristen Graham discuss the award and the series' impact on the city.
    Original Air Date: April 16, 2012
  • Secret Service Investigation: What's Under Investigation?
    The Secret Service sent 11 agents home after allegations of misconduct arose involving prostitutes at their hotel in Colombia ahead of President Obama's trip to the Summit of the Americas. Margaret Warner discusses the allegations with former Secret Service chief Ralph Basham and The Wall Street Journal's Laura Meckler.
    Original Air Date: April 16, 2012
  • Preventing a 'Cyber-Pearl Harbor'
    Government-funded DETERlab was built to bring established scientific principles to the field of cybersecurity in hopes of preventing successful cyber attacks on targets such as power grids, banks and train systems. Special correspondent Tom Bearden reports on the project's hopes amid a nation "wholly vulnerable" to such threats.
    Original Air Date: April 16, 2012
  • How Will FCC's Google Street View Fine Shape Data Rules?
    When Google launched its ambitious Street View project in 2007, its vehicles wound up capturing more than images. They also collected personal information from some Wi-Fi networks. Ray Suarez, George Washington University's Jeffrey Rosen and Punch Media's David Bennahum discuss the FCC's case, Google's response and data privacy.
    Original Air Date: April 16, 2012
  • Kabul 'Still on Edge' After 18-Hour Assault by Militants
    U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta said no tactical gains were made by militants' attacks in Kabul, which he said were "done for symbolic purposes." Jeffrey Brown and The Associated Press' Patrick Quinn discuss the situation in Kabul, security in other areas of Afghanistan plus how the militants pulled off the attacks.
    Original Air Date: April 16, 2012
  • Hoping to Change Odds, Las Vegas Gambles on Dropouts
    Earlier this year, Deputy Superintendent Pedro Martinez and Chaparral High School Principal David Wilson led teams into Las Vegas communities in search of dropouts. They knocked on doors and tried to entice wayward students back to class. The district says the off-beat approach is starting to show signs of success.
    Original Air Date: April 16, 2012
  • March Media Madness Results Video
    The NewsHour Student Reporting Labs program announces the results of its spring video competition.
    Original Air Date: April 16, 2012

Friday, April 13, 2012

  • Why Titanic's Story Still Resonates 100 Years Later
    One hundred years after the Titanic sank, the story of the technological triumph-turned-tragedy still captivates many people. Margaret Warner and writer Daniel Mendelsohn, author of the recent New Yorker piece "Unsinkable: Why We Can't Let Go of the Titanic," discuss the story's staying power.
    Original Air Date: April 13, 2012
  • Shields and Brooks on NRA, Ozzie Guillen, #CoryBookerStories
    Would Columnists Mark Shields and David Brooks dare do the Doubleheader on Friday the 13th? But of course. No black cats or broken mirrors could keep them from it. Shields and Brooks examine the significance of the NRA in today's Republican Politics, the plight of Miami Marlins Manager Ozzie Guillen, and Newark Mayor Cory Booker's heroic actions when he saved a neighbor from a burning building.
    Original Air Date: April 13, 2012
  • Shields, Brooks on Santorum's Exit, Romney's Poll Woes
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks discuss the week's top news including Rick Santorum's exit from the GOP race and what that means for Mitt Romney, plus Sen. Richard Lugar's tough re-election campaign, President Obama's push for the "Buffett Rule" and Hilary Rosen's swipe at Ann Romney.
    Original Air Date: April 13, 2012
  • Indiana Sen. Lugar Targeted for Defeat by His Own Party
    The Senate's most senior Republican, Richard Lugar is under pressure from within his own party to retire or be denied another term. At 80 years old, even Lugar seems slightly baffled about his political detractors. Gwen Ifill reports on the veteran senator's coming primary challenge on May 8.
    Original Air Date: April 13, 2012
  • Obama Colombia Visit Renews Call to Retool U.S. Drug Policy
    As President Obama joins the weekend Summit of the Americas in Colombia, he may hear renewed calls to legalize some drugs. Ray Suarez gets two views from Ethan Nadelmann of the Drug Policy Alliance and Ray Walser of the Heritage Foundation.
    Original Air Date: April 13, 2012
  • North Korea's Missile: What Went Wrong and What Happens Now?
    North Korea's much-hyped long-range missile broke apart early Friday causing much humiliation for the country's new leader, Kim Jong-un. Margaret Warner and guests discuss what's in store for Kim and the rogue nation's hopes of expanding its military capability in the face of increasing international condemnation.
    Original Air Date: April 13, 2012
  • Philippe Falardeau, Director of 'Monsieur Lazhar'
    After the suicide of a teacher in a Montreal middle-school, a class of grieving students is thrown together with an Algerian immigrant with tragic secrets of his own and who becomes their new teacher. The film, "Monsieur Lazhar," directed by Philippe Falardeau and adapted from a play, tells a story of cultural gaps and emotional chasms in one small classroom and out into the wider world.
    Original Air Date: April 13, 2012

Thursday, April 12, 2012

  • Poet Nye: 'Telling a Story Helped Us Figure Out Who We Were'
    When shaping verse, poet Naomi Shihab Nye reflects on her Palestinian heritage, family and the power of humanity. Jeffrey Brown and Nye discuss her most recent compilation of work, "Transfer," and what inspires her to continue crafting thoughtful and expressive poems.
    Original Air Date: April 12, 2012
  • Outlining the Senate Six: Democrats on Defense
    While a third of senators are on the ballot this November, six races should indicate where control of the Senate is headed. Part of a new series called the Senate Six, Ray Suarez and Christina Bellantoni outline what's at stake in races in Montana, Virginia, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Mexico and Wisconsin.
    Original Air Date: April 12, 2012
  • The E-Book War: the Stakes in the Fight for Readers' Dollars
    Citing consumer losses of millions of dollars, the Justice Department accused Apple and five publishers this week of colluding to raise e-book prices and break Amazon's dominant hold in the market. Jeffrey Brown discuss the state of the market with the American Booksellers Association's Becky Anderson and attorney Steve Berman.
    Original Air Date: April 12, 2012
  • Would a Major Earthquake Sink Portland in Liquefied Soil?
    Though the impact of Wednesday's 5.9-magnitude earthquake off Oregon's coast was minimal, a lesser-known risk of temblors -- a phenomenon called liquefaction where sandy soil turns to liquid and loses its ability to support weight -- has some scientists worried. Tom Bearden reports what's being done to prepare for a major quake.
    Original Air Date: April 12, 2012

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