Sunday, August 18, 2013

  • Civilian Patrols Complicate Crisis in Egypt
    Maria Abi-Habib, roving Middle East correspondent for The Wall Street Journal, joins Hari Sreenivasan from Cairo via Skype. Abi-Habib looks at the growing number of neighborhood civilian "committees" patrolling the streets, a trend born of a lack of confidence in the country's security forces.
    Original Air Date: August 18, 2013
  • The Long-Term Significance of the Muslim Brotherhood
    Zachary Lockman, professor of modern Middle Eastern History at New York University joins Hari Sreenivasan to speak about the wider issues raised by the ongoing conflict in Egypt.
    Original Air Date: August 18, 2013

Friday, August 16, 2013

  • Harper, Musselwhite Show Off 'Different Shades of Blues'
    Charlie Musselwhite and Ben Harper may have a generation between them, but their love of blues brought them together. With Musselwhite on the harmonica and Harper on guitar and vocals, the two musicians have collaborated on an album, "Get Up." Jeffrey Brown sits down with the artists for a taste of their 'all purpose blues.'
    Original Air Date: August 16, 2013
  • Shields and Brooks on Egyptian Bloodshed, N.C. Voter ID Law
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks talk to Judy Woodruff about the week's top political news, including how the U.S. should be responding to continuing clashes in Egypt, their take on the new N.C. Voter ID law and late political columnist Jack Germond's greatest legacy.
    Original Air Date: August 16, 2013
  • Ecuador Exposes Rain Forest to Oil Extraction Effort
    Thousands of species of plant and wildlife call Ecuador's Yasuni National Park home, but it is believed that beneath the lush floor lies $7.2 billion of oil. Drilling could threaten the rain forest's biodiversity and indigenous populations. Some scientists argue a balance could be found. Hari Sreenivasan reports.
    Original Air Date: August 16, 2013
  • Examining Kepler's Contribution to Space Research
    Since its launch in 2009, the Kepler space telescope has discovered more than 35,000 possible planets, but it will soon go dark forever. NASA has confirmed the spacecraft is beyond repair. As astronomers begin to look at Kepler's legacy, Judy Woodruff speaks with space and science writer Michael Lemonick.
    Original Air Date: August 16, 2013
  • Surveillance Court Can't Stop NSA from Violating Privacy
    A new report from the Washington Post revealed the National Security Agency has violated privacy rules 'thousands of times' each year since 2008. In a follow up, chief judge Reggie Walton told the Post the FISA court isn't able to verify when the NSA oversteps its authority. Margaret Warner speaks with Carol Leonnig of the Post.
    Original Air Date: August 16, 2013
  • Muslim Brotherhood Show No Sign of Backing Down
    It's 'all or nothing' for protesters in Cairo who so far show no signs of backing down despite continued use of force from security forces. Jeffrey Brown is joined by Nancy Youssef of McClatchy Newspapers to discuss how the Muslim Brotherhood is rallying support and Egyptian reaction to the U.S.'s response to the violence.
    Original Air Date: August 16, 2013
  • Watch Ben Harper and Charlie Musselwhite Harmonize
    Blues musicians Ben Harper, Charlie Musselwhite performed the acoustic guitar-harmonica duet, "You Found Another Lover (I Lost Another Friend)" for Art Beat at the Gibson showroom in Washington, D.C. The song is off the duo's recent album, "Get Up."
    Original Air Date: August 16, 2013
  • What Can Virtual Reality Do for You?
    Force for good or ill? Economics correspondent Paul Solman explores the latest virtual reality technology with Stanford University's Jeremy Bailenson, and weighs its societal impact with Jaron Lanier, author of "Who Owns the Future?"
    Original Air Date: August 16, 2013

Thursday, August 15, 2013

  • Pediatricians Add Reading to Essential Check-Up List
    National literacy program Reach Out and Read reaches kids in a place where they are almost guaranteed to visit: the doctor's office. Special correspondent John Merrow meets a new breed of pediatrician -- part doctor, part teacher -- who help parents share books with their children to improve and encourage cognitive development.
    Original Air Date: August 15, 2013
  • Mistaken Identity for Elusive Olinguito, World's New Mammal
    Misidentified for decades, this newly classified member of the raccoon family finally made its scientific debut. Jeffrey Brown discusses the surprising discovery with zoologist Kristofer Helgen of the Smithsonian Institution, who tracked the animal down to the cloud forests of Ecuador.
    Original Air Date: August 15, 2013
  • Does the Pentagon's Plan Do Enough to Curb Sexual Assault?
    The Defense Department is offering new initiatives to help combat sexual assault in the military, keeping adjudication within the chain of command. Will the plan help protect victims and prosecute offenders? Jeffrey Brown gets debate from attorney Susan Burke and retired Maj. Gen. John Altenburg, a former Army lawyer.
    Original Air Date: August 15, 2013
  • In the Wake of Turmoil, Should U.S. Suspend Aid to Egypt?
    President Barack Obama condemned the Egyptian government's use of violent force on protesters but stopped short of suspending $1.5 billion in aid the U.S. provides to Egypt each year. Judy Woodruff asks former U.S. ambassador Nicholas Burns and Joe Stork of Human Rights Watch for views on how the U.S. should proceed.
    Original Air Date: August 15, 2013
  • Mirror, Mirror on the Wall
    Paul Piff, a social psychologist at the University of California, Berkeley, describes his research exploring the relationship between wealth, entitlement and narcissism, and we see a reenactment of Piff's "mirror study."
    Original Air Date: August 15, 2013
    August 15, 2013
  • ‘Day One’ for Olinguito
    Zoologist Kristofer Helgen brings a stuffed olinguito to the PBS NewsHour studio Thursday. The furry mammal is a brand new species, unveiled today by Smithsonian zoologists. Kristofer calls it a special discovery, spanning 10 years of research. He talks about the research, and what research lies ahead for the animal that lives in the canopy of tall trees in the mountains of Colombia and Ecuador.
    Original Air Date: August 15, 2013
    August 15, 2013
  • Obama Condemns Violence in Egypt, Cancels Military Exercises
    After security forces attempted to forcibly shut down Pro-Morsi sit-ins, the country erupted into chaotic violence that has left hundreds dead and thousands injured. President Barack Obama addressed press from Martha's Vineyard, Mass.
    Original Air Date: August 15, 2013

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

  • Remembering Jack Germond, Stalwart of Political Journalism
    From Johnson vs. Goldwater in 1964 to Bush vs. Gore in 2000, Jack Germond covered every race. The political reporter, columnist and author, immortalized in the book "Boys on the Bus," has died at 85. Judy Woodruff talks to Dan Balz of The Washington Post about Germond's legacy on the modern political campaign press corps.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 2013
  • March on Washington Had More Radical Roots Than Remembered
    Historian William P. Jones joins Gwen Ifill to offer an overview of how the March on Washington came to be, why President Kennedy feared it would cause negative aftermath and what roles women of color played on that historic day. Their discussion is one a series of conversations looking back at the legacy of August 28, 1963.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 2013
  • Can a Computerized Test Measure Complex Common Core Skills?
    The new "Common Core" sets the standard for learning in America, but how do states test for these new, more complex and career-ready skills? Special correspondent for education John Merrow examines the challenge of measuring things like critical thinking and collaboration facing schools and teachers.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 2013
  • JP Morgan Inquiry Stays Open After Ex-Traders Are Charged
    Two former J.P. Morgan traders have been charged by federal prosecutors for trying to cover up $6.2 billion in bank losses after a series of bad bets. Dawn Kopecki of Bloomberg News joins Judy Woodruff the discuss the current allegations and whether there may be greater consequences for the firm going forward.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 2013
  • Can Egypt Move Forward After Violent Crackdown?
    Jeffrey Brown talks to Michael Giglio of Newsweek from Cairo about the scene at the frontlines of the bloody crackdown and his experience of being detained and beaten by Egyptian security forces, and NewsHour's Margaret Warner and Nathan Brown of George Washington University offer analysis on abandoned negotiation efforts.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 2013
  • The Highs and Lows of Covering Elections on the Campaign Bus
    When Timothy Crouse wrote "The Boys on the Bus" in 1972, he couldn't imagine how much media coverage of presidential elections would change with the rise of the Internet. Media correspondent Terence Smith reports on journalists' not-so-glamorous life on the campaign trail and how digital technology has changed the way media covered campaign politics.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 2013

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

  • Hollywood Ending for 'Ocean's 16' Lottery Winners
    In New Jersey, 16 Ocean County employees hit it big last week, winning a third of a $448 million Powerball jackpot. The lucky group of co-workers, who call themselves "Ocean's 16" after the famous film, explain how they feel about taking home $3.8 million each.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2013
  • Public School Students
    In the past, public school standards varied state to state.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2013
    Students fill a hallway at Coolidge High School in Washington, D.C., between classes May 1, 2014. Coolidge opened as a whites-only school in 1940, today it's students are almost exclusively African-American and Latino and from low-income households.
    August 13, 2013
  • Egyptian Foreign Minister on Struggle to Resolve Protests
    The continuing stand off between the interim government and sit-in protesters continues in Egypt despite International pressure to resolve the issue through dialogue rather than violence. Egyptian foreign minister Nabil Fahmy joins Margaret Warner to discuss his nation's effort to restore a sense of security for Egyptians.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2013
  • New Yorkers Weigh Safety and Harassment of 'Stop and Frisk'
    A federal judge declared that New York City's "Stop and Frisk" policy unfairly targets minorities, but New York's police commissioner says "race is never a reason to conduct a stop." Special correspondent William Brangham talks to New Yorkers who support the tactic, as well as citizens who have been targeted who say otherwise.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2013
  • Is North Carolina's Voter ID Law 'Common Sense' Policy?
    North Carolina's new voter ID law is the first to be passed since the Supreme Court struck down part of the Voting Rights Act. Starting in 2016, voters will have to present a government-issued photo ID at the polls. Judy Woodruff hears debate from Democratic Rep. G.K. Butterfield and Tom Murry, a Republican state representative.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2013

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