Wednesday, March 27, 2013

  • DO NOT PUBLISH
    Why are some of America's top academic achievers are missing out on a shot to attend the best universities? As part of the PBS NewsHour's continuing coverage on inequality in U.S., Jeffrey Brown talks with Caroline Hoxby of Stanford University, an author of a new study on the issue, and Michele Minter of Princeton University.
    Original Air Date: March 27, 2013
    March 27, 2013
  • Poor Students Go Unnoticed by Some Elite Universities
    Why are some of America's top academic achievers are missing out on a shot to attend the best universities? As part of the PBS NewsHour's continuing coverage on inequality in U.S., Jeffrey Brown talks with Caroline Hoxby of Stanford University, an author of a new study on the issue, and Michele Minter of Princeton University.
    Original Air Date: March 27, 2013
  • DO NOT PUBLISH
    In a New York City classroom, teachers use rap songs to teach complex science. Playlists are used as a metaphor to convey natural selection, and students compose raps songs to reinforce concepts. Ray Suarez reports on the effectiveness of this strategy and interviews hip-hop legend (and science geek) GZA of the Wu-Tang Clan.
    Original Air Date: March 27, 2013
    March 27, 2013
  • Songs for Biology: Students Write Hip-Hop to Learn Science
    In a New York City classroom, teachers use rap songs to teach complex science. Playlists are used as a metaphor to convey natural selection, and students compose raps songs to reinforce concepts. Ray Suarez reports on the effectiveness of this strategy and interviews hip-hop legend (and science geek) GZA of the Wu-Tang Clan.
    Original Air Date: March 27, 2013
  • Debating Discrimination in Defense of Marriage Act
    While the Supreme Court considers arguments for and against the federal Defense of Marriage Act, Judy Woodruff moderates a debate between Ken Klukowski, director of the Center for Religious Liberty at the Family Research Center, and Mary Bonauto, special counsel for the group Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders.
    Original Air Date: March 27, 2013
  • News Wrap: First Female Director of the Secret Service
    In other news Wednesday, Julia Pierson was sworn in as the new director of the Secret Service. Pierson, who was appointed by President Barack Obama, is the first woman to hold this post. Also, James Holmes, the man accused in the Colorado movie shooting last July, has offered to plead guilty and serve life in prison.
    Original Air Date: March 27, 2013
  • Supreme Court Considers Legality of Denying Benefits
    The Supreme Court took up whether same-sex couples should get the same federal benefits as heterosexual couples. Kwame Holman offers history on the Defense of Marriage Act and reactions from outside the court. Ray Suarez talks to National Law Journal's Marcia Coyle, who helps compare proceedings on both same-sex marriage cases.
    Original Air Date: March 27, 2013
  • Watch DOMA Challengers Speak After Oral Arguments End
    Following the oral arguments at the Supreme Court challenging the Defense of Marriage Act, known as DOMA, attorney Roberta Kaplan and plaintiff Edith Windsor, among others, spoke outside the court.
    Original Air Date: March 27, 2013

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

  • On Gay Rights, Voices from San Francisco's Castro District
    On Monday, ahead of oral arguments in the Supreme Court on the validity of Proposition 8, supporters in San Francisco marched from the Castro District to City Hall.
    Original Air Date: March 26, 2013
  • Women on a Top-Secret Mission in 'Atomic City'
    For the women whose lives are documented in the new book "The Girls of Atomic City," a top-secret mission during World War II gave them a chance to make history at a time when there were few career options. Ray Suarez talks to author Denise Kiernan about the women who helped enrich fuel for the first atomic bomb used in war.
    Original Air Date: March 26, 2013
  • San Francisco Symphony Strikes Sends Harsh Notes Nationwide
    The San Francisco's Symphony went out on strike and cancelled performances and an East Coast tour, asking for competitive salaries and benefits. The symphony's strike was only the latest in actions taken by several of the nation's orchestras. Spencer Michels reports on the labor disputes playing out across the country.
    Original Air Date: March 26, 2013
  • Investigating the Dangerous Working Conditions in Grain Bins
    An investigation by NPR and the Center for Public Integrity found dangerous and lethal working conditions in America's grain storage industry. Since 1984, 179 people have died at commercial storage facilities. For more on the investigation, Margaret Warner is joined by Howard Berkes, one of the lead NPR reporters on the story.
    Original Air Date: March 26, 2013
  • Housing Market Shows Fastest Recovery Since Before the Crash
    New reports show a spike in U.S. home prices, rising at the fastest pace since 2006. To learn what's driving this recovery, Hari Sreenivasan talks with Nicholas Retsinas of the Harvard Business School.
    Original Air Date: March 26, 2013
  • Attorneys Debate Constitutionality, Legality on Prop 8 Case
    As the Supreme Court considers arguments on the definition of marriage, and the legal and societal implications of same-sex marriage, Gwen Ifill moderates a debate between California Attorney General Kamala Harris and Austin Nimocks from the Alliance Defending Freedom, two attorneys who were present in the courtroom.
    Original Air Date: March 26, 2013
  • High Court Hears Challenge to Same-Sex Marriage Ban
    The Supreme Court considered the constitutionality of California's Proposition 8, a ballot measure that bans same-sex marriage. Kwame Holman reports on reactions from supporters on both sides of the debate. Judy Woodruff talks to Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal, who analyzes the arguments inside the courtroom.
    Original Air Date: March 26, 2013
  • Wu Tang Clan's GZA Raps About Science
    Rap legend GZA gives us a sneak peak of one of the songs from his new album, Dark Matter. The rapper has encouraged New York City public schools to use hip hop as a tool to teach science.
    Original Air Date: March 26, 2013
  • Watch Prop 8 Supporters Speak After Oral Arguments End
    Following the oral arguments supporting Proposition 8, California's ban on same-sex marriage, attorney Charles Cooper spoke outside the court.
    Original Air Date: March 26, 2013
  • Watch Prop 8 Challengers Speak After Oral Arguments End
    Following the oral arguments challenging Proposition 8, California's ban on same-sex marriage, attorneys David Boies and Theodore Olson, and plaintiffs Kris Perry, Sandy Stier, Jeff Zarrillo and Paul Katami spoke outside the court, unsure of the Supreme Court potential ruling.
    Original Air Date: March 26, 2013
  • Using Shakespeare's "The Tempest" as Anti-Bullying Tool
    The Colorado Shakespeare Festival and the University of Colorado's Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence have joined forces to create an anti-bullying program using the Bard's centuries-old works. Students at Thornton High School near Denver, CO watch an abridged and slightly modernized version of Act V, Scene 1 of "The Tempest."
    Original Air Date: March 26, 2013

Monday, March 25, 2013

  • Murder, Murderers and the Death Penalty at the Supreme Court
    A new book documents the murders, murderers and capital punishment overseen by the highest court in the U.S. Jeffrey Brown talks with veteran journalists Martin Clancy and Tim O'Brien about their new work, "Murder at the Supreme Court," about some of the most notorious crimes and subsequent penalties.
    Original Air Date: March 25, 2013
  • Local Businesses Help Refresh Irish Economy After Recession
    Ireland was hit hard during the global recession, suffering dramatic job losses and a mass exodus of skilled workers. Though the Irish are still cautious, a recovery is being driven by locally-grown businesses, startups and new takes on heritage industries. Ray Suarez reports from Dublin on pioneering businesses sprouting up.
    Original Air Date: March 25, 2013
  • Inside the Attempts to Get Cyprus Out of Financial Chaos
    Although Cyrpus has agreed to a bailout from Eurozone partners, concerns are still high that a wave of bankruptcies will rock the country. Margaret Warner talks to The New York Times' Liz Alderman from Nicosia for more on the bailout, the makeup of the Cypriot economy and how citizens have been coping.
    Original Air Date: March 25, 2013
  • Obama Pushes Immigration Reform at White House Ceremony
    At a ceremony at the White House for 28 new U.S. citizens, President Barack Obama called on Congress to come together on immigration reform. Judy Woodruff talks with Sara Murray of The Wall Street Journal about how Senate negotiations got hung up on the issue of lower-skilled worker wages.
    Original Air Date: March 25, 2013
  • John Kerry Faces New and Old Challenges in the Middle East
    What does Secretary of State John Kerry's schedule say about the current U.S. foreign policy priorities? How does the current secretary compare to his predecessor? Gwen Ifill talks with Michele Dunne of the Atlantic Council and Susan Glasser of Foreign Policy about the war in Afghanistan and challenges of responding to Syria.
    Original Air Date: March 25, 2013
  • do not publish
    Secretary of State John Kerry made an unannounced trip to Kabul, Afghanistan to hash out differences with President Hamid Karzai. Meanwhile the last Afghan prison still under U.S. control was handed back to Afghan authorities. Gwen Ifill reports on outcomes of the visit, plus other U.S. foreign policy challenges in the region.
    Original Air Date: March 25, 2013
    March 25, 2013
  • Floyd, Joplin Among Additions to National Recording Registry
    Van Cliburn's triumphant Cold War performance in Moscow, the mambo music of Cuban bassist Israel "Cachao" Lopez, and Chubby Checker's "The Twist" are among the 25 sound recordings newly inducted into the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress.
    Original Air Date: March 25, 2013
  • Using Babies to Decrease Aggression, Prevent Bullying
    Roots of Empathy, first started in 1996 in Toronto and introduced into U.S. schools in 2007, aims to build more peaceful and caring societies by increasing the level of empathy in children. The social and emotional learning program uses infants as springboards to talk about feelings and other subjects not often addressed in traditional classroom settings.
    Original Air Date: March 25, 2013

Friday, March 22, 2013

  • Shields, Brooks on Congressional Escapes and March Madness
    We begin the Doubleheader talking about how Congress scrambles to escape before the "good" holidays, and then syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times Columnist David Brooks turn to their strategies for picking the eventual winners of the glorious month of basketball we know as March Madness.
    Original Air Date: March 22, 2013

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