Thursday, August 4, 2011

  • 'Made in India' Examines International Journey Through Surrogacy Process
    In "Made in India," filmmakers Rebecca Haimowitz and Vaishali Sinha follow the journey of an infertile Texas couple and the Indian surrogate who gives birth to their children. This excerpt is part of The Economist Film Project series of independently produced films aired in partnership between The Economist and the NewsHour.
    Original Air Date: August 4, 2011
  • Massive Campaign of Cyber Spying Uncovered
    The public learned this week of a five-year, high-level hacking campaign that infiltrated computer systems of more than 70 governments, corporations and public and private organizations in 14 countries. Margaret Warner discusses the hack, uncovered by McAfee, with Vanity Fair's Michael Joseph Gross, who broke the story.
    Original Air Date: August 4, 2011
  • FAA Shutdown Coming to an End, but Funding Fight Still Looms
    Congressional leaders announced Thursday they had reached a bipartisan agreement to temporarily extend funding for the Federal Aviation Administration, which would end the nearly two-week partial shutdown but leave long-term funding in question. Jeffrey Brown discusses the deal with Public Radio International's Todd Zwillich.
    Original Air Date: August 4, 2011
  • Bloomberg: Americans Worry That U.S. Is Losing Competitive Edge
    In an interview with the NewsHour Thursday, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg reacted to the latest market drop and concerns about the economy.
    Original Air Date: August 4, 2011
  • Market Plunge Startles Investors, But Fed 'Out of Ammo' Amid Double-Dip Fears
    Wall Street finished its worst day since the financial crisis began in 2008 Thursday as the Dow Jones industrial average fell more than 500 points. Judy Woodruff discusses investors' concerns about a possible double-dip recession with Hugh Johnson of Hugh Johnson Advisors and Gillian Tett of The Financial Times.
    Original Air Date: August 4, 2011

Wednesday, August 3, 2011

  • After Long Debt Battle, Is Current Version of U.S. Government Sustainable?
    After many months of heated debate, Washington was finally able to compromise on a debt deal to avert a government default this week. Judy Woodruff discusses how the battle over the debt ceiling compares to other politically polarized times with Yale University's Beverly Gage and Harvard University's David King.
    Original Air Date: August 3, 2011
  • From Netflix to Hulu, Streaming Video Businesses Gaining Ground
    What have you been watching on your computer lately? More and more Americans are checking out movies and television program online. Hari Sreenivasan discusses the recent push toward more streaming content with Gershon Media's Bernard Gershon.
    Original Air Date: August 3, 2011
  • Heat Wave, Drought Create 'Grim' Crop Yields for Farmers in Plains, South
    New research by the National Drought Mitigation Center shows 12 percent of U.S. land is in the midst of an exceptional drought, which is the largest contiguous area to suffer such difficult conditions in 12 years. Ray Suarez discusses how the drought has punished American farmers with Harvest Public Media's Frank Morris.
    Original Air Date: August 3, 2011
  • Mubarak Trial an 'Extraordinary Moment' for Egypt, Middle East
    The trial of Hosni Mubarak, the former Egyptian strongman, began Wednesday with him pleading innocent to charges of corruption and presiding over the killing of nearly 900 protesters. Margaret Warner discusses the trial's significance with Harvard University's Tarek Masoud and the Council on Foreign Relations' Steven Cook.
    Original Air Date: August 3, 2011
  • Caged Mubarak Begins Corruption Trial by Denying All Charges
    Hosni Mubarak, the former Egyptian president, was wheeled into court Wednesday on a hospital gurney, where his trial began on charges of corruption and presiding over the killing of nearly 900 protesters. Margaret Warner reports on the first Arab leader to stand trial in person in the wake of the Arab spring uprisings.
    Original Air Date: August 3, 2011
  • News Wrap: Syrian Troops Cut Water, Electricity Supply in Hama
    In other news Wednesday, a crackdown against anti-government protesters escalated in Syria. Overnight, the city of Hama was heavily shelled, tanks moved into the main square and electricity and water supplies were cut off. Also, Tropical Storm Emily churned through the Caribbean, threatening to dump inches of rain on Haiti.
    Original Air Date: August 3, 2011
  • Tepid Economy at Heart of Global Market Volatility
    At a cabinet meeting on Wednesday, President Obama said the debt deal had averted "a massive blow" to the economy, but it wound up being another rocky day for global markets. Jeffrey Brown discusses the latest on the markets and the economy with Liz Ann Sonders of Charles Schwab & Co. and PIMCO's Mohamed El-Erian.
    Original Air Date: August 3, 2011
  • Obama's Post Debt-Limit Burger
    President Obama and the senior staff members who were part of the debt limit negotiations went out for a hamburger at Good Stuff Eatery on Capitol Hill
    Original Air Date: August 3, 2011

Tuesday, August 2, 2011

  • USAID Chief: Famine in Somalia 'Worse Than You Can Imagine'
    In a new effort to alleviate the suffering in famine-stricken Eastern Africa, the U.S. government eased its restrictions on providing aid to Somalia -- aimed at sanctioning al-Shabab -- in hopes of getting more food to starving people. Margret Warner discusses the change in policy with USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah.
    Original Air Date: August 2, 2011
  • Utah's Health Insurance Experiment Built Around Small Businesses
    Under the federal health care reform law, all states will be required to set up a health insurance exchange starting in 2014. Betty Ann Bowser reports on one state that is ahead of the game, and how the new system is helping small businesses.
    Original Air Date: August 2, 2011
  • Survey: Muslim-Americans Have Rosier Outlook Than Other Americans
    Nearly 10 years after the 9/11 attacks and with the American military involved in multiple Muslim nations, a Gallup survey showed strong positive feelings among Muslim-Americans about their prospects in this country. Ray Suarez discusses the poll's findings with Mohamed Younis of the Gallup Center for Muslim Studies.
    Original Air Date: August 2, 2011
  • Budget Impasse, Partial Shutdown Costing FAA Millions in Lost Revenue
    Since July 23, the FAA has furloughed nearly 4,000 employees and shut down construction grants for workers at airport facilities. Judy Woodruff discusses the budget impasse, which is costing the FAA millions in lost revenue, with Public Radio International's Todd Zwillich and USA Today's Ben Mutzabaugh.
    Original Air Date: August 2, 2011
  • Raise the Roof: Debt Crisis Averted, But Debate Far From Over
    The Senate passed a bipartisan agreement to raise the U.S. debt ceiling and cut spending Tuesday. President Obama quickly signed the deal, but it couldn't stop a sell-off on Wall Street. Jeffrey Brown discusses the compromise bill with University of California, Berkeley's Robert Reich and Stanford University's John Taylor.
    Original Air Date: August 2, 2011
  • Health Insurance Exchange 101
    Julie Appleby of Kaiser Health News talks with Hari Sreenivasan about the basics of the online marketplaces which will aim to make it easy for all Americans to buy health insurance.
    Original Air Date: August 2, 2011
  • AP Raw Video: Senate Passes Debt Ceiling Bill
    A bill to raise the debt ceiling and cut federal spending limits passed the Senate just after noon Tuesday, and is now headed to President Obama's desk to be signed into law. (Aug. 2)
    Original Air Date: August 2, 2011

Monday, August 1, 2011

  • Advanced Technology, Old-Fashioned Tactics Helped Make Bin Laden Raid a Success
    For all the planning that went into the Abbottabad raid that killed Osama bin Laden, there were moments when everything could have gone wrong. Ray Suarez discusses the Navy SEAL operation with journalist Nicholas Schmidle, who uncovered new details about the May raid for an article in the latest issue of The New Yorker.
    Original Air Date: August 1, 2011
  • Syrians Pledge to Escalate Protests During Ramadan as Crackdown Continues
    On Sunday, President Obama said he was appalled by the Assad regime's use of violence and brutality against opposition demonstrators in Syria. Margaret Warner discusses what's next for the uprising in Syria with the Financial Times' Abigail Fielding-Smith, reporting form Beirut.
    Original Air Date: August 1, 2011
  • Amid Debt-Ceiling Drama, Interest Rates Have Hardly Followed the Script
    On Wall Street, stocks initially rallied Monday on the news of a debt-ceiling deal, but a weak report on manufacturing killed the surge. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports on the financial world's reactions to the drama over a debt deal as part of his series on Making Sen$e of financial news.
    Original Air Date: August 1, 2011
  • From Left and Right, Opposition to Debt Deal Remains
    As the Senate prepares to take up a compromise bill to raise the national debt ceiling, members of Congress on both sides of the aisle are noting their opposition to the compromise. Jeffrey Brown discusses the opposing arguments with Reps. Raul Grijalva, D-Ariz., and Tim Huelskamp, R-Kan.
    Original Air Date: August 1, 2011
  • White House Demands Revenues in Next Steps of Deficit Battle
    The debt-ceiling deal hammered out by President Obama and congressional leaders over the weekend passed the House late Monday and is set for a Senate vote midday on Tuesday. Judy Woodruff discusses the deal and the ongoing debate in Washington with Jack Lew, director of the White House's Office of Management and Budget.
    Original Air Date: August 1, 2011
  • Default by Debt Ceiling? 'Complete Nonsense'
    On Monday's NewsHour Paul Solman reports from the trading floor of Natixis CIB Americas to see how the stock market was reacting to news of the debt ceiling deal.
    Original Air Date: August 1, 2011
  • Inside Mexico's Sinaloa Drug Cartel
    Los Angeles Times staff writer Richard Marosi describes his reporting on the Sinaloa drug cartel and federal sting operation.
    Original Air Date: August 1, 2011
  • Weekly Poem by K. Silem Mohammad
    K. Silem Mohammad is the author of "Breathalyzer" (Edge Books, 2008), "A Thousand Devils" (Combo Books, 2004) and "Deer Head Nation" (Tougher Disguises, 2003). He is editor of Abraham Lincoln.
    Original Air Date: August 1, 2011

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