Wednesday, October 30, 2013

  • UN Peacekeepers travel treacherous roads in the DRC
    Jon Sawyer of the Pulitzer Center for Crisis reporting interviews UN peacekeeprs struggling to respond to violence in Eastern Congo.
    Original Air Date: October 30, 2013
  • Author Roger Rosenblatt investigates his Manhattan childhood
    Roger Rosenblatt thinks he perhaps pursued a life of words to express understanding of his own life experiences. In "The Boy Detective: A New York Childhood," he draws on recollections of growing up in Gramercy Park in order to craft his memoir. Judy Woodruff sits down with Rosenblatt to discuss the use of memory in his writing.
    Original Air Date: October 30, 2013
  • Will changing the sports culture reduce youth concussions?
    While pro football has begun to confront the consequences of concussions, a new report is putting the spotlight on younger athletes and the risk they face from repeated head injuries. Jeffrey Brown talks to Dr. Robert Graham of The George Washington University, former NFL player Fred McCrary and athletic trainer Tamara McLeod.
    Original Air Date: October 30, 2013
  • Budget committee begins to air differences on spending
    Since 2010, Congress has operated under continuing resolutions rather than one-term budgets. As part of the solution that ended the shutdown, a bipartisan committee has begun talks to negotiate political differences on funding. Judy Woodruff and NewsHour political editor Christina Bellantoni discuss prospects for compromise.
    Original Air Date: October 30, 2013
  • Sen. Mitch McConnell: health reform law can't work
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., believes the problems with the Affordable Care Act implementation extends beyond the website's technical troubles. Gwen Ifill sits down with Sen. McConnell to discuss his criticism of the ACA, his take on NSA spying allegations and which common causes unite the GOP factions.
    Original Air Date: October 30, 2013
  • Obama defends ACA benefits, confronts cancellation claims
    President Obama told a crowd in Boston that he is "not happy" about the rocky HealthCare.gov rollout, but assured Americans the site would be fixed as soon as possible. The president also touted the benefits of the ACA and disputed claims that health care reform has caused some insurance plans to be cancelled.
    Original Air Date: October 30, 2013
  • Sebelius apologizes over ACA launch 'debacle'
    Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius faced hours of questioning on Capitol Hill over the flawed ACA website launch. Sebelius accepted blame for the site's issues and apologized to Americans, saying: "You deserve better." Kwame Holman reports on the security and enrollment concerns voiced by lawmakers.
    Original Air Date: October 30, 2013
  • Obama says he takes "full responsibility" for fixing website
    Speaking from Faneuil Hall in Boston, Mass. on Wednesday, President Barack Obama says he takes "full responsibility for making sure [HealthCare.gov] gets fixed ASAP."The president's speech follows the morning's hearing where Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said that she's responsible for the "debacle" of technical problems that overwhelmed the government website.
    Original Air Date: October 30, 2013
  • Excerpt: McConnell is confident he'll win 2014 GOP primary
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell talks to PBS NewsHour co-anchor Gwen Ifill looking ahead to 2014 Republican primaries Kentucky Republican will face off with businessman Matt Bevin. If his prediction is correct and he prevails, McConnell will face Democratic Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes in the general election next fall.
    Original Air Date: October 30, 2013
  • Kathleen Sebelius apologizes for HealthCare.gov glitches
    Appearing before the House Energy and Commerce Committee Wednesday, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius apologized for the technical difficulties that Americans have experienced when attempting to purchase insurance off of federal exchanges via HealthCare.gov. House Republicans and Democrats questioned Sebelius for the first time since HealthCare.gov went live on Oct. 1
    Original Air Date: October 30, 2013
  • Bilingual rock-star Julieta Venegas 'feels' in Spanish
    Latin American singer-songwriter Julieta Venegas grew up in Tijuana, a Mexican city just across the border from the United States. Fluent in both Spanish and English, she chooses to write her own songs in Spanish because, she explained, her emotional life always occurred in Spanish. Art Beat met up with Venegas during her Los Momentos tour.
    Original Air Date: October 30, 2013

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

  • Lawmakers remember ex-speaker Tom Foley
    Former speaker Tom Foley died at the age of 84, after spending more than 30 years as a member of the House of Representatives. Here are excerpts from his memorial at the Capitol, where leaders and lawmakers from both sides of the aisle lauded his decency and service.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • Poet Billy Collins on humor, authenticity and 'Aimless Love'
    "I knew that poets seemed to be miserable," says writer Billy Collins about his younger self, yearning to fit in. While he admits he "faked a miserable character" at the start of his career, he's since embraced his sense of humor. Jeffrey Brown talks to Collins about his new collection, "Aimless Love: New and Selected Poems."
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • Will polio outbreak inspire international action for Syria?
    Ten cases of polio have been confirmed in Syria -- the first appearance of the disease in the country since 1999. Gwen Ifill speaks with Joel Charny of InterAction on how the outbreak adds to the challenge of the humanitarian crisis and how the ongoing war has caused the destruction of the nation's medical infrastructure.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • What the lowlands can teach about warding off high water
    Superstorm Sandy showed U.S. coastal cities the damage water can do -- a threat the Dutch have lived with for centuries. Their system of dams and dikes, locks and levees is keeping the Netherlands safe in a world with rising seas. Miles O'Brien reports on what Americans can learn from the Dutch model of flood management.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • Rep. Sensenbrenner: President 'ought to draw a line' for NSA
    A bipartisan group of lawmakers are calling for an end to most of the NSA's phone and email surveillance. Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., says he believes the president "ought to draw a line" that NSA shouldn't cross. He joins Judy Woodruff to discuss why he believes there should be reform of the scope of U.S. spying programs.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • Congress grills Medicare head on health care site problems
    Medicare chief Marilyn Tavenner faced questions on Capitol Hill about the rocky rollout of HealthCare.gov and the administration's proposed timeline for fixes. Kwame Holman reports. Jonathan Gruber of MIT and industry consultant Robert Laszewski join Gwen Ifill for more on Americans whose insurance policies are being canceled.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • Will Beach Nourishment Save Coney Island?
    Coney Island reopened after Hurricane Sandy wiped out the beach amusement park. Its new roller coaster Cyclone towers over a beach nourishment project, where dredges pull up sand from the ocean floor and pump it back onto the shore. This has been a Coney Island tradition since the 1920s, but is it enough to save the beach?
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • New York Plans for Resilience
    The storm surge from Hurricane Sandy wiped out power and businesses in New York, some of which took weeks to come back online. Now power and telephone companies have bounced back and are taking precautions for the next big storm.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • Dutch Homeowners Move to Make Room for the River
    The Dutch have dealt with flooding for centuries by heightening dykes -- and that may not have been wise. Hans Brouwer, senior branch manager with the "Room for the River" project says it's time to the give land back to the river. This means farmers and homeowners have been asked to give up their land to make room for the rivers' natural floodplains, which has not been easy.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • The Sand Engine Churns to Bring Sand to the Beach
    As beaches around the world rapidly erode, Marcel Stive of the Delft University of Technology says we need to nourish the coasts by putting sand back on the shore. These beaches are vital to coastal cities, holding back the ocean during storms, he said. He has developed the Sand Engine, a means of restoring sand to the beach with minimal environmental impact.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • Blue Mussels Clean and Protect New York Harbor
    After the destruction caused by Hurricane Sandy, New York City looks for ways to protect the metropolis from future floods. Civil engineers look to floodgates, but landscape architect Kate Orff is looking at tiny blue mussels for answers. Rebuilding the natural mussel beds and marshes around the city offers natural protection against waves, and they will clean the harbor's dirty waters, she said.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • Climate Change, Hurricane Sandy and How to Cope
    Klaus Jacob, a special research scientist with the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, explains how climate change will turn events like Hurricane Sandy into more frequent and more disastrous events."One weather event like Sandy does not make climate change. But it is a symptom with many other events that will show yes there is something going [on] and we call it climate change," Jacob said.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • Windmills Continue to Transform the Dutch Landscape
    The Netherland's iconic windmills are now relics, but they were once the height of flood control technology. These quaint windmills transformed the low-lying region from a bog into a habitable place.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • Playing Judo with Nature
    Scientists in the Netherlands are turning to "eco-engineering", using natural barriers to hold back rising tides and flood waters. Mindert De Vries explains how they are playing "judo with nature", creating a balance with nature instead of fighting it with brute strength.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
    October 29, 2013

Monday, October 28, 2013

  • 'Underground' artist Lou Reed inspired tomorrow's rockers
    As founder of The Velvet Underground, musician and songwriter Lou Reed sang of sexual adventurism and illicit drug use, launched a new genre of rock 'n' roll and left a lasting influence for bands to come. Jeffrey Brown talks to Anthony DeCurtis of Rolling Stone magazine about Reed's legacy and literary influences.
    Original Air Date: October 28, 2013
  • 'Days of Fire' unveils complicated Bush-Cheney partnership
    Peter Baker, chief White House correspondent for The New York Times, says Dick Cheney was arguably the most influential vice president, but that his relationship with President George W. Bush was quite complicated and unique. Baker joins Judy Woodruff to discuss his new book, "Days of Fire: Bush and Cheney in the White House."
    Original Air Date: October 28, 2013
  • Penn State settles with abuse victims for $59.7 million
    Penn State has struck a nearly $60 million settlement with 26 young men over alleged abuse by former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky. Gwen Ifill talks to Charlie Thompson of The Patriot-News in Harrisburg, Pa., for more on how this settlement compares to similar cases and what factors led to the premium payout.
    Original Air Date: October 28, 2013

VIDEO SEARCH