Monday, March 18, 2013

  • GOP Take Stock of Losses, Map Strategy to Retake White House
    Reince Priebus, chair of the Republican National Committee, unveiled an unsparing, 98-page report on the party's 2012 presidential election loss. Gwen Ifill gets analysis from USA Today's Susan Page and Stuart Rothenberg of the Rothenberg Political Report on the GOP's soul-searching and future-looking tactics.
    Original Air Date: March 18, 2013
  • Colleges See Older Workforce Holding On to Coveted Positions
    In academia, many professors remain working and teaching long past traditional retirement age, leaving younger potential professors shut out from highly coveted full-time, tenured positions. As part of a series on older workers, economics correspondent Paul Solman reports on how institutions are negotiating with aging faculty.
    Original Air Date: March 18, 2013
  • Israel's New Government Looks to Domestic Agenda
    As neighbors in the region grapple with uncertainty and conflict, Israel's new governing coalition seems to be refocusing on domestic concerns. Jeffrey Brown talks with former U.S. Ambassador to Israel Martin Indyk and David Makovsky of the Washington Institute for an assessment of Israel's new political lineup and priorities.
    Original Air Date: March 18, 2013
  • Will the Banking Crisis in Cyrpus Rock Other Markets?
    Cyprus, off the coast of Greece, is facing its own economic problems. A banking crisis has forced Cyrpus towards a bailout. Other countries fearing aftershock effects on their markets For more on the situation, Judy Woodruff is joined by Jacbob Kirkegaard of the Peter G. Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    Original Air Date: March 18, 2013
  • High Court Hears Arguments on State, Federal Voter ID Law
    The Supreme Court heard arguments on a voter registration law in Arizona that requires voters to provide physical proof of citizenship in order to decrease voter fraud. The case pits the state law against federal law, and opponents say it unfairly targets minorities. Gwen Ifill talks to Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal.
    Original Air Date: March 18, 2013
  • Grassroots Groups Court Young Conservatives at CPAC
    While most cameras are fixed on the speakers and big-names at this year's Conservative Political Action Conference, NewsHour takes a look at the volunteers, activists and conference attendees, the people who are having the relevant conversations about the future of the conservative party.
    Original Air Date: March 18, 2013

Friday, March 15, 2013

  • Shields and Brooks on Cruz vs. Feinstein and March Madness
    In this edition of the Doubleheader, where we discuss the politics of sports and the sport of politics with syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks, we talk about the political dust up between Senators Cruz and Feinstein regarding assault weapons. We also begin discussing what we likely will for the next few weeks; March Madness.
    Original Air Date: March 15, 2013
  • Former JP Morgan Executive Deflects Blame for Mistake
    Ina Drew, the former J.P. Morgan Chase executive who resigned after that bank made a billion dollar trading error, faced a Senate hearing Friday, where she testified she had been a diligent manager but had been lied to by subordinates. Ray Suarez talks with Bloomberg News' Dawn Kopecki who attended the hearing.
    Original Air Date: March 15, 2013
  • Decision Delayed on Dangerous Chemical in Drinking Water
    Science correspondent Miles O'Brien talks to scientists, members of the chemical industry and representatives from Pacific Gas and Electric about chromium-6 contamination in American drinking water. What is a safe level for humans to consume and why has the EPA stalled on setting a federal standard?
    Original Air Date: March 15, 2013
  • Shields and Brooks on CPAC, Obama's Outreach to Congress
    New York Times columnist David Brooks and syndicated columnist Mark Shields talk with Judy Woodruff about who was and wasn't at the annual CPAC meeting, whether President Obama's bipartisan outreach to Congress will produce results, plus words on what the new pope's leadership may mean for the Catholic Church.
    Original Air Date: March 15, 2013
  • Conservative Activists Outline Political Future at CPAC
    The annual CPAC gathering brought together conservatives, activists and possible 2016 candidates tapped with the responsibility to reshape and re-energize the Republican party. Kwame Holman gets reactions from attendees and looks at why some prominent GOP leaders, like New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, won't be at the podium.
    Original Air Date: March 15, 2013
  • Father Helps Promote Empathy by Sharing Emotions in Class
    Andy Haner accompanies his wife Layla and eight-month-old daughter Emory to a third grade class once each month as part of Roots of Empathy. The non-profit program teaches children about emotions and feelings through by following the growth and development of infants. While mostly mothers bring their babies to the schools, Andy is one of the few fathers to do so and explains why.
    Original Air Date: March 15, 2013
  • A Baby's visit to Third Grade Teaches about Milestones
    Emory Haner, an eight-month-old girl visits third graders at Olympic Hills Elementary School in suburban Seattle once a month to teach students about childhood development and empathy as part of Roots of Empathy. The non-profit program has been shown to reduce aggression and improve pro-social behavior in students who have taken it, leading to fewer bullying incidents in those schools.
    Original Air Date: March 15, 2013

Thursday, March 14, 2013

  • Young Republican Attends CPAC for Rising Stars of the GOP
    Andy Reuss, an intern for Republican Sen. Mike Lee, got the chance to attend the 40th Conservative Political Action Conference. NewsHour followed this first-time attendee of CPAC as he spends the day hearing speeches from the rising stars of the conservative movement, collects swag, and meets with political organizations from all across the country.
    Original Air Date: March 14, 2013
  • State of Life in Japan Two Years After Tsumani
    In 2011 Japan was hit with one of the strongest earthquakes in recorded history, prompting a devastating tsunami and a nuclear disaster. How are residents coping with the aftermath two years later? Ray Suarez interviews Yuki Tatsumi, senior analyst on U.S.-Japanese relations at the Stimson Center.
    Original Air Date: March 14, 2013
  • Seattleites Make Rain Gardens to Curb Stormwater Pollution
    In an effort to curb pollution from stormwater runoff, Seattle residents have begun a campaign to build 12,000 rain gardens around the Puget Sound. Katie Campbell of KCTS 9 reports.
    Original Air Date: March 14, 2013
  • New Art Installation Lights Up San Francisco's Other Bridge
    A new art installation brings new light to San Francisco Bay. The Bay Bridge, which connects San Francisco and Oakland, is the focus of a new public art display featuring thousands of LED technology lights. NewsHour correspondent Spencer Michels has the story of the high-tech work of art.
    Original Air Date: March 14, 2013
  • Michigan Gov. Puts Detroit Under Emergency Fiscal Management
    Michigan's Gov. Rick Snyder announced an emergency financial manager will take over Detroit's finances. The city has faced economic struggles as residents and businesses left for suburbs and it saw reductions in state aid. Margaret Warner talks to Gov. Snyder and Detroit's new financial manager, Kevyn Orr, about the plan.
    Original Air Date: March 14, 2013
  • Argentines Hope Pope Francis Can Reform Vatican Transparency
    Pope Francis is the first pontiff to hail from Argentina. He's also a huge soccer fan. For more on the pope's South American roots and his home country's reaction to the papal election, as well as the intersection of religion, populism and politics there, Jeffrey Brown talks with Hugh Bronstein of Reuters from Buenos Aires.
    Original Air Date: March 14, 2013
  • Examining U.S. Concerns as China Welcomes New President
    China officially installed Xi Jinping, already the Communist Party leader, as president for the next 10 years. Judy Woodruff talks to Kenneth Lieberthal of the Brookings Institution and Gordon Chang, an author and a contributor to Forbes, about contentious issues of trade, defense, and cyber security for China and the U.S.
    Original Air Date: March 14, 2013
  • How Did Processed Food Take Over the American Meal?
    How did the United States become a nation “where food isn't so much cooked as disassembled and reassembled"? Former New York Times reporter Melanie Warner speaks with Hari Sreenivasan about her new book, “Pandora’s Lunchbox: How Processed Food Took Over the American Meal.”
    Original Air Date: March 14, 2013

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

  • Survivors Share Sexual Assault Experiences in the Military
    Women in combat zones are more likely to be raped by a fellow soldier than killed by the enemy. Of nearly 4,000 reports of sexual assault in the military last year, only 191 defendants were convicted. Judy Woodruff reports on testimony from male and female sexual assault victims about attacks they suffered while in the military.
    Original Air Date: March 13, 2013
  • Protecting Americans From Danger in the Drinking Water
    The town of Hinkley, Calif., had a Hollywood moment when its battle with chromium-6 tainted water was made into the film "Erin Brockovich." But Hinkley, still struggling with contamination, hasn't had a Hollywood ending. Miles O'Brien examines what chemicals are in our drinking water and why it's so difficult to get rid of them.
    Original Air Date: March 13, 2013
  • Have Past Presidents Found a Winning Bipartisan Strategy?
    As budget negotiations progress, President Barack Obama continues to emphasize bipartisanship. To examine if this approach has helped with politics and policies in the past, Judy Woodruff talks with presidential historian Michael Beschloss and Marc Hetherington, an author and political science professor at Vanderbilt University.
    Original Air Date: March 13, 2013
  • Pope Francis Brings 'New Gifts' to the Catholic Church
    Pope Francis is known as a humble man, invested in issues of poverty, who is socially progressive and doctrinally conservative. Ray Suarez talks to Chester Gillis of Georgetown University and Sister Simone Campbell of NETWORK, a social justice organization, about how the new pontiff will help shape the Catholic Church.
    Original Air Date: March 13, 2013
  • Bergoglio Is First South American, First Jesuit Pontiff
    The election of Pope Francis marked two firsts for the papal office: he is both the first South American and the first Jesuit pope. For more on the historic selection and what it reflects about the current state of the Catholic Church, Gwen Ifill talks with Michael Sean Winters of the National Catholic Reporter.
    Original Air Date: March 13, 2013
  • Watch Pope Francis Make His First Appearance
    Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Buenos Aires, Argentina, who was announced to be Pope Francis, appeared on the Vatican balcony to greet onlookers in St. Peter's Square and say a prayer.
    Original Air Date: March 13, 2013
  • Watch the Swiss Guard March Into Vatican City in Preparation
    With white smoke pouring out of the Vatican chimney, people flocked to Vatican City to witness the reveal of the next Pope. The Swiss Guard marched onto the Vatican steps to the playing of celebratory music.
    Original Air Date: March 13, 2013

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