Thursday, August 1, 2013

  • U.S. and Russia Reluctant to Upset Diplomacy Despite Tension
    Russia's offer of asylum to NSA leaker Edward Snowden has U.S. officials weighing whether to cancel President Barack Obama's upcoming summit with President Vladimir Putin. Will it affect long-term diplomacy between the two nations? Jeffrey Brown gets an update on the Snowden story from Paul Sonne of The Wall Street Journal.
    Original Air Date: August 1, 2013
  • Former Inspector General Defends NSA Programs
    Joel Brenner, former inspector general of the National Security Agency, said the NSA is working within its mandate and is not compiling dossiers on all American citizens.
    Original Air Date: August 1, 2013
  • Ex-NSA Analysts on Their Top-Secret Discoveries
    Two former National Security Agency analysts talk about when they discovered the agency was collecting more data on American citizens.
    Original Air Date: August 1, 2013

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

  • Fighting to Unravel India's Widespread Child Labor Abuses
    There are laws against child labor in India, yet millions of underage children are still trafficked or forced by poverty to toil away in factories. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro profiles an entrepreneur who developed a labeling system for rugs made without child labor and helps get underage workers back in school.
    Original Air Date: July 31, 2013
  • As Egypt Announces New Measures, U.S. Considers Influence
    The Egyptian interim government may take violent measures to combat protest. Is this move reminiscent of the Egyptian government's repressive history? How should the Obama administration respond? Judy Woodruff gets analysis from Michelle Dunne of the Atlantic Council and Samer Shehata from the University of Oklahoma.
    Original Air Date: July 31, 2013
  • Who Will Succeed Bernanke at the Federal Reserve?
    Federal Reserve board chairman Ben Bernanke will step down from his term in January, and Washington is already buzzing with discussion of who will replace him. Judy Woodruff sits down with David Wessel of The Wall Street Journal to discuss the importance of the Federal Reserve chief and why it matters who takes the helm next.
    Original Air Date: July 31, 2013
  • Debate Over the Secret Court That Approves Surveillance
    The role of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court has come under scrutiny in the wake of leaks on NSA surveillance programs. Who serves on the FISA Court? And is there any oversight for the judges who oversee government surveillance programs? Jeffery Brown poses these questions to experts James Bamford and Steven Bradbury.
    Original Air Date: July 31, 2013
  • Obama Administration Reveals NSA Phone Surveillance Details
    The American public is learning more about the government's phone surveillance program, revealed by leaker Edward Snowden. The Obama administration released documents showing how the National Security Agency uses the data. Gwen Ifill is joined by Charlie Savage, who is covering the story for The New York Times.
    Original Air Date: July 31, 2013

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

  • Investigation Finds Pattern of Problems for Elder Care
    Hundreds of thousands of elderly Americans live in assisted living centers across the nation. A.C. Thompson of ProPublica shares an excerpt from his FRONTLINE documentary "Life and Death In Assisted Living," and some troubling cases of elder care from his investigation.
    Original Air Date: July 30, 2013
  • Gillibrand Calls to Reform Handling of Military Sexual Crime
    The Pentagon estimates that 26,000 troops were sexually assaulted last year, but only 3,400 attacks were reported. What's the best way to change how the military handles these cases? Judy Woodruff talks to Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, who advocates removing sexual assault cases out of the chain of command.
    Original Air Date: July 30, 2013
  • Doctors Propose New Cancer Definitions
    A panel of doctors and scientists proposed a change to the definition of cancer, in hopes of shifting the way we think about and treat the disease. Gwen Ifill discusses the recommendation with Dr. Barnett Kramer of the National Cancer Institute and Dr. Larry Norton of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.
    Original Air Date: July 30, 2013
  • Did Bradley Manning Get a Fair Trial?
    Though found not guilty of aiding the enemy, Army Pfc. Bradley Manning was convicted on other 19 charges. Former CIA official Jeffrey Smith and Michael Ratner from the Center for Constitutional Rights join Jeffrey Brown to offer their views on the verdict, the fairness of his charges and the impact for the U.S. government.
    Original Air Date: July 30, 2013

Monday, July 29, 2013

  • Lindy Boggs, First Woman to Chair a Democratic Convention
    Lindy Boggs, 97, died over the weekend but during her lifetime she was a woman of firsts. The former Congresswoman was the first woman to be elected from Louisiana and the first woman to chair a Democratic Convention. She was also a mother of three, including former NewsHour congressional correspondent Cokie Roberts.
    Original Air Date: July 29, 2013
  • Shoring Up the Fiscal Health of Other U.S. Cities
    The Detroit bankruptcy has been described as a tragedy, but is it a unique case? What can be done to prevent similar fates for other cities across the nation? Jeffrey Brown turns to Kathryn Wylde of the Partnership for New York City, Richard Florida of the University of Toronto and Bruce Katz of the Brookings Institution.
    Original Air Date: July 29, 2013
  • Teens Lose Important Summer Jobs as Older Workers Fill Spots
    The geography of the job market has changed in the past decade. Jobs typically held by teens are now being filled by older workers. In Boston, some organizations are trying to mobilize America's unemployed youth and bring them into the professional labor market. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports.
    Original Air Date: July 29, 2013
  • Pope Francis Helps Shift Conversation About the Vatican
    The pope's remarks on gay Catholics may suggest a shift in acceptance, but not a change in church policy or teaching. Judy Woodruff talks to John Allen of The National Catholic Reporter, who has been covering the pontiff's trip to Brazil, to discuss how Pope Francis has started to change the perception of the Catholic church.
    Original Air Date: July 29, 2013
  • Can Israel, Palestinians Find Formula for Progress on Peace?
    To examine the challenges and opportunities for Israel and the Palestinians going into a new round of talks, Judy Woodruff gets analysis from David Makovsky of the Project on the Middle East Peace Process and Hussein Ibsish of the American Task Force on Palestine.
    Original Air Date: July 29, 2013
  • John McCain Reflects on His Friendship With the Late Bud Day
    Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., tells Gwen Ifill about his friendship with the late retired Col. George "Bud" Day, who shared a cell with the Republican senator as prisoners of war in Vietnam. Day, a Medal of Honor serviceman passed away at the age of 88.
    Original Air Date: July 29, 2013
  • Sen. John McCain on Dealmaking in Congress, Future of GOP
    With Congress divided by partisanship, Sen. John McCain has stepped up as a dealmaker between Democrats and Republicans in order to make progress and avoid political showdowns on important legislation. Gwen Ifill talks to the Arizona Republican about his role as a mediator between Republicans and the Obama administration.
    Original Air Date: July 29, 2013

Friday, July 26, 2013

  • The Doubleheader Returns
    Welcome back to the Doubleheader, where we talk about the sport of politics and politics of sport with syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks. Today we take a high level view of the Filner Files, what's happening in New York with Anthony Weiner's campaign, and the Mets' drubbing of the Washington Nationals.
    Original Air Date: July 26, 2013
    July 26, 2013
  • Shields, Brooks on Obama's Speech, Congress Collaboration
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks talk to Judy Woodruff about the week's top news, including whether President Barack Obama's economy remarks were substantive, if the future looks bright for collaboration in Congress and what they think of former President George H.W. Bush's new haircut.
    Original Air Date: July 26, 2013
  • Renewed Conversation on Stigma Facing Black Men in America
    The killing of Trayvon Martin provoked candid reflection from President Barack Obama on the subject of discrimination and American race relations. Nathan McCall, Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Bishop Harry Jackson Jr. and Michael Melton join Jeffrey Brown to continue the conversation on life and perception for black men in the U.S.
    Original Air Date: July 26, 2013
  • Radiation Still Poses Danger Around the Ruins of Fukushima
    Luck has not turned around for now-deserted Fukushima, Japan. Two years after enduring an earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster, the area is still radioactive and leaking contaminated water into the sea. Independent Television News' Alex Thompson shares a rare glimpse of the radioactive ghost town.
    Original Air Date: July 26, 2013
  • Halliburton Admits Destroying Evidence in Gulf Spill Blame
    Who's to blame for the disaster caused by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon rig explosion? The battle over liability continues to play out in court. Bloomberg Businessweek's Paul Barrett sits down with Hari Sreenivasan to discuss contractor Halliburton's guilty plea for destroying evidence.
    Original Air Date: July 26, 2013
  • Egypt, Tunisia Find Trouble With Transition to Democracy
    Margaret Warner joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest unrest for Egypt and Tunisia and how both countries have faced major challenges in establishing inclusive, pluralistic democracies.
    Original Air Date: July 26, 2013
  • Prosecutors, Defense Give Different Views of Bradley Manning
    Bradley Manning's defense lawyer called him a whistleblower while the prosecution says he's a traitor. Now it's up to a judge to decide the fate of the soldier accused of leaking classified documents to WikiLeaks. Charlie Savage of The New York Times was in the court room and shares what he saw with Jeffrey Brown.
    Original Air Date: July 26, 2013

Thursday, July 25, 2013

  • Calif. Inmates Hunger Strike to Protest Indefinite Isolation
    Pelican Bay State Prison in Northern California is designed to hold some of the state's most violent offenders in isolated security units. In early July, inmates launched a state-wide a hunger strike to demand limits on time spent in solitary. Special correspondent Michael Montgomery offers background on the policy.
    Original Air Date: July 25, 2013
  • Criminal Charges Allege SAC Capital Did Insider Trading
    Federal prosecutors say one of Wall Street's most successful hedge funds engaged in securities fraud for at least a decade. At SAC Capital, five former employees have admitted to insider trading. Bloomberg Businessweek's Sheelah Kolhatkar joins Hari Sreenivasan to explore the details of the allegations.
    Original Air Date: July 25, 2013

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