Friday, April 11, 2014

  • How poetry advanced the civil rights movement
    U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey and Jeffrey Brown recently traveled from Mississippi to Alabama on a pilgrimage to witness the historical struggles and sorrows people faced during the civil rights movement. On their 100-mile journey, they examine the role of poetry in advancing the movement's message for justice and freedom.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
  • UN commissioner: refugee crises need more international aid
    War has upended the lives of millions in Syria and a never-ending humanitarian crisis. Aid groups attempt to meet basic needs of refugees and internally displaced Syrians but face a massive shortfall in finances. Judy Woodruff talks to U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres about the need for increased political and financial commitments in Syria, as well as CAR and South Sudan.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
  • Shields and Brooks on Sebelius' legacy, Civil Rights Act
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss this week’s news, including the resignation of Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius and the trouble with healthcare.gov rollout that defined her tenure, the anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, and potential candidates for the 2016 presidential election.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
  • Has the market rally in biotech stocks hit a wall?
    Thursday marked the single worst day for the Nasdaq since 2011. The once high-flying biotech and Internet shares tumbled, pulling the index below 4000 on Friday for the first time since Feb. 3. Hari Sreenivasan talks to Hugh Johnson of Hugh Johnson Advisors about what's behind investors' jitters and why tech and biotech tend to be more volatile than other stocks.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
  • Why states are beginning to drop Common Core standards
    Oklahoma has become the latest state to move toward repealing the Common Core national education standards. Once the subject of bipartisan support, the standards are facing criticism from the left and right. Jeffrey Brown gets two views on the potential repeal from Oklahoma State Representatives Jason Nelson (R) and Emily Virgin (D).
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
  • U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey reads 'Miscegenation'
    U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey reads "Miscegenation" while in Jackson, Mississippi. For more Art Beat: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/topic/arts/
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
  • U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey reads 'Incident'
    U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey reads her poem "Incident," while in Jackson, Mississippi. For more Art Beat: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/topic/arts/
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
  • Jerry Mitchell on the Congressional Civil Rights Pilgrimage
    During the annual Congressional Civil Rights Pilgrimage, investigative reporter at The Clarion-Ledger Jerry Mitchell speaks about the important of returning to the house where Medgar Evers was killed. For more Art Beat: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/topic/arts/
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
  • Mylie Evers at the Congressional Civil Rights Pilgrimage
    During the annual Congressional Civil Rights Pilgrimage, Myrlie Evers speaks to the crowd in front of the house where Medgar Evers was killed. For more Art Beat: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/topic/arts/
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
  • Obama names budget chief his choice of successor for Sebelius
    President Barack Obama praised outgoing Health and Human Secretary Kathleen Sebelius for helping to steer his health care law's comeback after a rocky rollout, even as he nominated a successor aimed at helping the White House move past the political damage.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014

Thursday, April 10, 2014

  • Justice Dept. accuses Albuquerque PD of ‘unjustified force’
    The U.S. Justice Department released a scathing report on its findings of a pattern of “unjustified force” by the Albuquerque Police Department in New Mexico. The report offers details on 23 fatal shootings since 2010, including the March shooting of James Boyd, a 38-year-old homeless man with a history of mental illness. Jeffrey Brown talks to Gene Grant of KNME for more insight.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2014
  • Why six years of high school might pay off in the workforce
    At Pathways in Technology Early College High School in Brooklyn, N.Y., students are expected to attend for six years, earning both a high school diploma and a two-year Associate’s degree. P-TECH and other schools based on the same model aim to give students from low-income families a head start on college with free, career-oriented coursework. Hari Sreenivasan tells the story.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2014
  • UN initiative aims to put 57 million kids in school
    There are 200 million children worldwide who do not attend school. A new U.N. initiative led by former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown aims to get 57 million more children into school by the end of 2015. Judy Woodruff interviews Brown, now a U.N. special envoy for Global Education, about overcoming ingrained social practices around the globe and mobilizing the children themselves.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2014
  • How the Civil Rights Act opened a door to the American dream
    President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act into law 50 years ago. Gwen Ifill examines its legacy and unfinished business with President Johnson’s daughter, Lynda Johnson Robb, Shirley Franklin, the former mayor of Atlanta, Ranjana Natarajan of the University of Texas School of Law, and former House Republican aide Robert Kimball.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2014
  • The presidential pen stroke that outlawed discrimination
    Half a century ago, Lyndon B. Johnson signed landmark legislation outlawing discrimination based on race, ethnicity and sex. At a summit honoring this chapter of Johnson’s legacy, President Obama applauded the Civil Rights Act of 1964 for opening doors of opportunity for himself and other Americans, while former Presidents Clinton and Carter cautioned that challenges remain. Gwen Ifill reports.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2014
  • Gordon Brown on guaranteeing education for refugee children
    Judy Woodruff talks with Gordon Brown, the former U.K. prime minister who is now the United Nations' special envoy for global education about efforts to educate Syrian refugee children in Lebanon. Watch that part of the interview now to hear how Brown thinks the plan to share Lebanese school buildings could revolutionize education for refugees around the world.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2014
  • Mavis Staples sings 'We Shall Overcome'
    Mavis Staples appeared on stage Thursday to sing "We Shall Overcome." Her performance was part of a Civil Rights Summit on Thursday to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2014

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

  • Echoes from Marian Anderson’s defiant performance
    Marian Anderson, the legendary African-American contralto, sang at the Lincoln Memorial exactly 75 years ago after she was refused a performance at Washington’s Constitution Hall. On Wednesday, young people gathered to commemorate Anderson’s effort to strike out against racism through the power and beauty of her voice. Jeffrey Brown reports.
    Original Air Date: April 9, 2014
  • Drugs used in lethal injections come under scrutiny
    As foreign supplies have dwindled, traditional lethal injection drugs are being replaced with others manufactured in the U.S. But inmates and lawyers are questioning whether these new drugs will result in death without undue pain and suffering. Gwen Ifill takes a closer look at the issue with Megan McCracken of the University of California, Berkeley and Joel Zivot of Emory University.
    Original Air Date: April 9, 2014
  • 'Long way to go' in reform of Bangladesh's garment industry
    Almost a year has passed since a Bangladeshi factory collapsed, killing more than 1,100 garment workers. What has been done in that country and by the international garment industry to make the factories there safer? And how have the victims and their families been compensated? Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro returns to Bangladesh to find out.
    Original Air Date: April 9, 2014
  • How significant is security bug Heartbleed?
    A major lapse in internet security has potentially exposed millions of passwords, credit card numbers, bank information and commonly used websites. The security leak, called “Heartbleed,” was revealed this week but may have existed for years. Hari Sreenivasan learns more from Russell Brandom of The Verge.
    Original Air Date: April 9, 2014
  • Evaluating vast payout disparity among Medicare doctors
    Just 3 percent of doctors and medical providers received at least one-quarter of the $77 billion paid to providers by the government in 2012, according to an unprecedented and controversial release of data by Medicare. Judy Woodruff gets analysis from Dr. Ardis Hoven of the American Medical Association and Shannon Pettypiece of Bloomberg News.
    Original Air Date: April 9, 2014
  • Why this bear had to be taken from its mother
    Zookeepers at the Smithsonian's National Zoo are now mom to this sloth bear cub, because when she was born, her mother ate her siblings. But keepers say her mother's reaction was normal, even healthy.
    Original Air Date: April 9, 2014
  • Vets race to rescue cheetah cubs from their mother
    On Christmas Day, zookeepers at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute raced to rescue cheetah cubs from their mother, who had injured her cubs with life-threatening infections. Now they hope that another cheetah mother will adopt them.
    Original Air Date: April 9, 2014

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

  • Is ‘student-athlete’ a misnomer?
    Players and fans celebrated the March Madness victory by the University of Connecticut, but the game against the University of Kentucky also highlighted one of the major debates facing NCAA basketball. Jeffrey Brown gets perspectives from Patrick Harker, president of the University of Delaware, and Kevin Blackistone of the University of Maryland about student players and the amateurship model.
    Original Air Date: April 8, 2014
  • Easing the burden for families of long-term caregiving
    For the 42 million Americans who take care of loved ones at home, the responsibilities of care -- once the purview of trained nurses -- have become increasingly complex. AARP has begun to advocate for greater caregiver support through public policy and legislation, but the health care industry may be wary of additional regulation. Special correspondent Kathleen McCleery reports.
    Original Air Date: April 8, 2014
  • Unprecedented Ebola outbreak crosses borders in West Africa
    More than 100 people have died so far in the worst outbreak of the Ebola virus in years, which began in Guinea before spreading to Liberia. Now health officials are investigating possible cases in Mali and Ghana. Jeffrey Brown talks to Laurie Garrett from the Council on Foreign Relations about past outbreaks and the current challenges for containment.
    Original Air Date: April 8, 2014
  • Obama signs executive orders on pay transparency
    President Obama issued two executive orders aimed at income disparity based on gender on what the White House dubbed Equal Pay Day. But Republicans charged the president and Democrats were playing politics rather than improving policy. Judy Woodruff gets two views from Ariane Hegewisch of the Institute for Women's Policy Research and Genevieve Wood of the Heritage Foundation.
    Original Air Date: April 8, 2014

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