Friday, July 26, 2013

  • Renewed Conversation on Stigma Facing Black Men in America
    The killing of Trayvon Martin provoked candid reflection from President Barack Obama on the subject of discrimination and American race relations. Nathan McCall, Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Bishop Harry Jackson Jr. and Michael Melton join Jeffrey Brown to continue the conversation on life and perception for black men in the U.S.
    Original Air Date: July 26, 2013
  • Radiation Still Poses Danger Around the Ruins of Fukushima
    Luck has not turned around for now-deserted Fukushima, Japan. Two years after enduring an earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster, the area is still radioactive and leaking contaminated water into the sea. Independent Television News' Alex Thompson shares a rare glimpse of the radioactive ghost town.
    Original Air Date: July 26, 2013
  • Halliburton Admits Destroying Evidence in Gulf Spill Blame
    Who's to blame for the disaster caused by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon rig explosion? The battle over liability continues to play out in court. Bloomberg Businessweek's Paul Barrett sits down with Hari Sreenivasan to discuss contractor Halliburton's guilty plea for destroying evidence.
    Original Air Date: July 26, 2013
  • Egypt, Tunisia Find Trouble With Transition to Democracy
    Margaret Warner joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest unrest for Egypt and Tunisia and how both countries have faced major challenges in establishing inclusive, pluralistic democracies.
    Original Air Date: July 26, 2013
  • Prosecutors, Defense Give Different Views of Bradley Manning
    Bradley Manning's defense lawyer called him a whistleblower while the prosecution says he's a traitor. Now it's up to a judge to decide the fate of the soldier accused of leaking classified documents to WikiLeaks. Charlie Savage of The New York Times was in the court room and shares what he saw with Jeffrey Brown.
    Original Air Date: July 26, 2013

Thursday, July 25, 2013

  • Calif. Inmates Hunger Strike to Protest Indefinite Isolation
    Pelican Bay State Prison in Northern California is designed to hold some of the state's most violent offenders in isolated security units. In early July, inmates launched a state-wide a hunger strike to demand limits on time spent in solitary. Special correspondent Michael Montgomery offers background on the policy.
    Original Air Date: July 25, 2013
  • Criminal Charges Allege SAC Capital Did Insider Trading
    Federal prosecutors say one of Wall Street's most successful hedge funds engaged in securities fraud for at least a decade. At SAC Capital, five former employees have admitted to insider trading. Bloomberg Businessweek's Sheelah Kolhatkar joins Hari Sreenivasan to explore the details of the allegations.
    Original Air Date: July 25, 2013
  • News Wrap: Credit Card Hackers Indicted, Steals $300 Million
    In other news Thursday, a group of hackers from Russia and Ukraine were charged with stealing cash and goods totaling more than $300 million by accessing credit and debit card numbers through computers of major corporations. Also, a train derailment in Spain left 80 dead and nearly 100 more with injuries.
    Original Air Date: July 25, 2013
  • Holder: Texas Should Get Approval for Election Rule Changes
    Attorney General Eric Holder is pushing for ongoing scrutiny of Texas' voting laws despite a Supreme Court ruling striking down the pre-clearance provision of the Voting Rights Act. Judy Woodruff talks to Hans von Spakovsky of the Heritage Foundation and Nina Perales of the Latino legal civil rights organization MALDEF.
    Original Air Date: July 25, 2013

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

  • Diminishing Checks and Balances Considering War
    The last official declaration of war from the U.S. Congress was in 1941, but the United States has been engaged in frequent military conflict since then. Ray Suarez sits down with Marvin Kalb to discuss the evolving power of the president in his book "The Road to War: Presidential Commitments Honored and Betrayed."
    Original Air Date: July 24, 2013
  • Watch President Obama's Remarks on the Economy
    President Barack Obama said Wednesday that Washington has "taken its eye off the ball" as he pledged a stronger second-term commitment to tackling the economic woes that strain many in the middle class nearly five years after the country plunged into a recession. Obama gives his second speech in his series at the University of Central Missouri.
    Original Air Date: July 24, 2013
  • Francis Greeted Jubilantly in Rio on First Trip as Pope
    Pope Francis, the first pontiff from Latin American, was greeted by jubilant crowds as he made his inaugural international trip as leader of the Catholic Church. Margaret Warner talks to The Washington Post's Marie Arana for more on what his visit means for Brazilians and the greater Latin American Catholic population.
    Original Air Date: July 24, 2013
  • San Quentin Prisoners Find Peace, Power Through Exploration
    Inside the walls that hold many of California's offenders, some inmates are learning to find peace. Prisoners at San Quentin can take part in a year-long initiative where they practice tactics to address the root causes of their violent behavior. Special correspondent Katie Olsen shows us who is benefiting from the program.
    Original Air Date: July 24, 2013
  • Report Reveals Where You Live Affects Your Economic Mobility
    Children of low-income families in certain communities are more likely to move up the economic ladder than others, says a new report by Harvard University and University of California, Berkeley. Jeffrey Brown talks to co-author Raj Chetty, Harvard professor of economics, for more on their portrait of American social mobility.
    Original Air Date: July 24, 2013
  • News Wrap: Snowden Obtains Document to Enter Russia
    In other news Wednesday, NSA leaker Edward Snowden will be able to leave the transit zone of a Moscow airport after obtaining documentation allowing him to officially enter Russia. A State Department spokeswoman voiced disappointment. Also, at least 35 people were killed in a train derailment in northwest Spain.
    Original Air Date: July 24, 2013
  • Obama Calls for Long-Term Economic Plan to Help Rebound
    On the campus of Knox College in Galesburg, Ill., President Barack Obama renewed his commitment to addressing economic issues and strengthening the middle class during his second term. Jeffrey Brown reports on the president's promises and the critical responses by Republican lawmakers.
    Original Air Date: July 24, 2013
  • Watch Harry Reid's Full Interview
    Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) sat down with Judy Woodruff to talk about Congress, fights with Republicans over filibusters, immigration reform, re-election, and Hillary Clinton's chances at running for president.
    Original Air Date: July 24, 2013
  • Darrell Walker Turns Wetlands Into Outdoor Classroom
    Darrell Walker, an eighth grade science teacher at Elizabeth City Middle School in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, has turned the wetlands behind his school into an outdoor classroom, teaching his students about ecology, water quality and chemistry.
    Original Air Date: July 24, 2013

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

  • Issue of Sexual Consent Between Elderly Adults With Dementia
    As increasing numbers of older Americans have had to deal with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, Bryan Gruley of Bloomberg News reports that nursing homes find themselves ill-equipped to handle issues of sexual relations. Ray Suarez talks to Gruley about the ethical, legal and practical questions for health care professionals.
    Original Air Date: July 23, 2013
  • Syria Humanitarian Help Exacerbated by Delivery Difficulties
    Secretary of State John Kerry met with international humanitarian aid officials to discuss the difficulties of trying to protect and assist the millions of people displaced by the Syrian war. Margaret Warner talks to Assistant Secretary of State Ann Richards and Nancy Lindborg of the U.S. Agency for International Development.
    Original Air Date: July 23, 2013
  • California Takes Legal Guns Held by Now-Prohibited Owners
    California’s Armed and Prohibited Persons program has recovered more than 10,000 guns that were purchased legally, but by people who are now prohibited from owning them. Critics say the program is expensive and time-consuming. NewsHour correspondent Spencer Michels reports on whether other states could use the same model.
    Original Air Date: July 23, 2013
  • Is Health Care Reform a Good Bargain for Young Americans?
    Under the Affordable Care Act, getting young people into the health insurance market will be critical to offsetting the cost of caring for older, sicker Americans. Ray Suarez gets two views on how health reform will affect young adults from Jen Mishory of Young Invincibles and Generation Opportunity's Evan Feinberg.
    Original Air Date: July 23, 2013
  • Little Prince of Cambridge Makes His Royal Debut
    It’s the moment the world has been waiting for: a first glance at the newest member of the British royal family. The Prince of Cambridge and his proud parents were greeted by fans and the media outside the Lindo Wing of St. Mary's Hospital in London. Tim Ewart of Independent Television News reports.
    Original Air Date: July 23, 2013
  • White House Reaffirms Syrian Rebel Support
    Talk of stepped-up assistance for Syrian rebels came from the White House after a letter from Gen. Martin Dempsey was released, outlining the Pentagon's options for going beyond humanitarian aid. Judy Woodruff considers the risks with The Washington Institute’s Jeffrey White and John Mearsheimer of the University of Chicago.
    Original Air Date: July 23, 2013

Monday, July 22, 2013

  • Remembering Helen Thomas
    Known for her tough questioning, White House correspondent Helen Thomas fired questions at 10 U.S. presidents over the course of her career covering Washington politics. Margaret Warner talks to The Washington Post's Karen Tumulty about Thomas' legacy as a journalistic trailblazer and White House institution.
    Original Air Date: July 22, 2013
    July 22, 2013
  • How Political Cartoons Shape Popular Opinion
    While not always considered high art, journalist Victor Navasky says the power of cartoons to provoke and amuse is so strong that their creators can end up famous, jailed or dead. Navasky joins political editor Christina Bellantoni to discuss "The Art of Controversy," a look at how cartoons have shaped politics worldwide.
    Original Air Date: July 22, 2013
  • Gang ‘Killing Fields’ Become Site of Safe Parties
    Los Angeles has turned former urban battlegrounds into common grounds for communities in an effort to stomp out gun violence. What looks like a regular block party is a program that brings gang members, police officers and other neighbors together. Ray Suarez examines how the Summer Night Lights event is making the city safer.
    Original Air Date: July 22, 2013
  • Suicide Bombers Targeted Two Prisons Outside of Baghdad
    Juan Cole, Professor at the University of Michigan, and Stephen Biddle, Professor at George Washington University discuss the prison outbreak in Iraq.
    Original Air Date: July 22, 2013

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