Friday, July 12, 2013

  • Shields, Brooks on the Fluster Over Filibusters, N.Y. Bids
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks analyze the week's news with Judy Woodruff, including the decision by House Republicans to reject the Senate immigration bill, Senate Leader Harry Reid's call to change filibuster rules and new political bids by Anthony Weiner and Eliot Spitzer.
    Original Air Date: July 12, 2013
  • Money Flow Is Concern for San Joaquin River Restoration
    In 2006, environmentalists and farmers signed an agreement to share water from the San Joaquin River, as federal government planned to refill the waterway and restore the salmon population. But with the recession and $100 million already spent, Spencer Michels reports both sides worry there won't be enough money to finish.
    Original Air Date: July 12, 2013
  • Shields and Brooks on Palin and Puig
    In this episode of the Doubleheader -- where syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks tackle the sport of politics and the politics of sport with Correspondent Hari Sreenivasan -- the guys discuss the kerfuffle in Alaska between former Gov. Sarah Palin and Sen. Mark Begich, plus the hitting phenom tearing through baseball, Yasiel Puig.
    Original Air Date: July 12, 2013
  • Probe Continues for 'Inexplicable' SFO Plane Crash
    How did two experienced pilots, flying on a clear day, end up crashing Asiana Airlines Flight 214 at San Francisco International Airport? Hari Sreenivasan updates the investigation efforts and gets more detail and reaction from Andy Pasztor of The Wall Street Journal.
    Original Air Date: July 12, 2013
  • Will Snowden Continue Leaks if Granted Russian Asylum?
    For the first time in weeks, it was confirmed that NSA leaker Edward Snowden is in Moscow. Ray Suarez talks to Ellen Barry of the New York Times about Snowden's dwindling options, his defense of his actions and what conditions Russia may enforce in order to agree to hosting him.
    Original Air Date: July 12, 2013
  • Zimmerman Defense Attorney Urges: Not to 'Connect the Dots'
    A jury of six women will now decide the fate of George Zimmerman, on trial for the murder of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla. In his closing argument, defense lawyer Mark O'Mara insisted that Zimmerman acted out of self-defense. He urged the jury not to let their sympathy influence the verdict. Judy Woodruff reports.
    Original Air Date: July 12, 2013

Thursday, July 11, 2013

  • How Virtual Reality Games Can Transform Society, Prosperity
    Video games give players super powers and transport them to new worlds. How might this technology be used to transform society? Economics correspondent Paul Solman visits researchers who use virtual reality to affect human behavior in the real world, from putting more money into savings to avoiding the use of plastic bags.
    Original Air Date: July 11, 2013
  • Dispute on Details Leading Up to Canadian Train Disaster
    Hari Sreenivasan talks to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Nancy Wood, who offers an update on the new criminal investigation into the train derailment and explosion, backlash inside the town of Lac-Megantic against the rail company CEO and whether the recent accident is likely to affect oil transportation in Canada.
    Original Air Date: July 11, 2013
  • Recent Protests Have Been Scene of Rampant Sexual Assault
    While trying to participate in recent protests and the shaping of their country's future, nearly 100 Egyptian women have been sexually assaulted in Tahrir Square by attackers who may be systematically planning their crimes. Lindsey Hilsum of Independent Television News reports on activism to protect women from harassment.
    Original Air Date: July 11, 2013
  • Rep. Raúl Grijalva: Secure Border Fences Is 'Naive'
    Unwilling to consider the Senate's comprehensive approach to immigration, House Republicans are instead working on four options that stress security and enforcement. Ray Suarez talks to Rep. Raúl Grijalva, D-Ariz., who advocates the inclusion of a pathway to citizenship along as part of a complex and lasting solution.
    Original Air Date: July 11, 2013
  • Jury Hears Prosecution's Closing in Trayvon Martin Case
    The final phase of the Trayvon Martin murder trial began as the prosecuting attorney offered his closing arguments. Hari Sreenivasan recaps details from the case and gets an update on the latest from the courtroom in Sanford, Fla., with USA Today's Yamiche Alcindor.
    Original Air Date: July 11, 2013
  • NTSB: Asiana Pilot Saw "Bright Light" on Final Approach
    NTSB Chair Deborah Hersman held the final press briefing on Asiana Flight 214 Thursday to update findings from the air crash in San Francisco. Hersman said the flying pilot observed a "bright light" during the final approach that didn't affect his vision. Hersman also said none of the other crew members mentioned a light source and it wasn't discussed on the cockpit voice recorder (CVR).
    Original Air Date: July 11, 2013

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

  • Liao Yiwu Howls Against the Chinese Government
    After the massacre at Tiananmen Square in 1989, poet Liao Yiwu responded in anger and sadness with a powerful poem that become popular among activists. But his verse led to his imprisonment. Jeffrey Brown talks to the poet about his work and time in prison, recounted in his new memoir, "For a Song and a Hundred Songs."
    Original Air Date: July 10, 2013
  • Allegations of Undisclosed Gifts Emerge for Va. Governor
    Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell is the focus of mounting scrutiny over revelations of large, undisclosed gifts given to him and his family by businessman Jonnie R. Williams Sr. Judy Woodruff talks to Virginian Pilot reporter Julian Walker for more on the brewing controversy.
    Original Air Date: July 10, 2013
  • Children in Burkina Faso Get Dirty Work of Digging Up Gold
    Gold production has more than doubled in Burkina Faso in recent years. But that boom has led to a increase in the employment of child laborers in small, artisanal mines. In collaboration with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, photojournalist Larry C. Price recently visited several communities to document the conditions.
    Original Air Date: July 10, 2013
  • Party Leaders Say GOP House Won't Consider Immigration Bill
    House Republicans met with Speaker John Boehner to discuss immigration reform strategy. GOP leaders indicated they would not take up the Senate-passed measure. Ray Suarez talks to Rep. Luis Gutierrez, D-Ill., and Rep. Raúl Labrador, R-Idaho, both members of the House Judiciary Committee, about the options under consideration.
    Original Air Date: July 10, 2013
  • Alleged Marathon Bomber Pleads Not Guilty to 30 Charges
    Nineteen-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev pleaded not guilty to 30 criminal counts, ranging from carjacking to use of a weapon of mass destruction, resulting in the death of three people near the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon. Gwen Ifill talks to David Abel of the Boston Globe, who has covered the case since the bombings.
    Original Air Date: July 10, 2013
  • A Child's Workday in the Burkina Faso Gold Mine
    Karim Sawadogo works in a small artisanal gold mine in Fofora, in southwest Burkina Faso. He's unsure of his age, but thinks he is nine years old. Karim works 12-hour days in the mine, performing menial tasks with others his age. Through a translator, he describes his typical workday.
    Original Air Date: July 10, 2013

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

  • Need Immigration 'Tripod of Security' Before Other Reform
    House Speaker John Boehner says he prefers a step-by-step approach to immigration reform, rather than the comprehensive Senate bill that includes a path to citizenship. What options are being considered by the Republican-led House? Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., joins Ray Suarez to discuss his priorities for reform.
    Original Air Date: July 9, 2013
  • Are the Odds Against BP in Appeal Over Damage Claims?
    Judy Woodruff talks with Paul Barrett of Bloomberg Businessweek for background on the appeal by BP over the settlement agreement to cover claims and clean-up costs associated with the Deep Water Horizon oil spill.
    Original Air Date: July 9, 2013
  • Artists Learn Art of Business to Brave Tough Economic Times
    In the classical performing arts, more and more artists -- ever more highly skilled -- compete for fewer and fewer jobs, ever more poorly paid. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports on how artists are learning to fine tune their entrepreneurial skills in order to help them design their own careers in an unsure economy.
    Original Air Date: July 9, 2013
  • Could Texas Turn Blue? Parties See Lone Star Opportunity
    With Texas' Republican Gov. Rick Perry announcing he won't seek re-election, and a prominent fight over abortion rights being led by Texas Democrat Wendy Davis, Gwen Ifill talks to James Henson of the University of Texas at Austin and Cal Jillson of Southern Methodist University about whether the state's politics are shifting.
    Original Air Date: July 9, 2013
  • Egyptian Interim Leader Offers Election Timetable
    Egypt's military-appointed interim President Adly Mansour laid out a timetable for amending the country's constitution and electing a new parliament and president. Mansour also named an interim prime minister and vice president. Judy Woodruff reports on reactions to Egypt's new political "road map."
    Original Air Date: July 9, 2013
  • Watch the Full Yarnell Hill Memorial Service
    Thousands gathered for a memorial service Tuesday in Prescott, Ariz. to honor the 19 Granite Mountain Hot Shot firefighters who were killed in the Yarnell Hill wildfire.
    Original Air Date: July 9, 2013
  • Watch VP Joe Biden Speak at Yarnell Hill Memorial
    Vice President Joe Biden speaks at the memorial for the 19 firefighters killed in the Yarnell Hill wildfire.
    Original Air Date: July 9, 2013

Monday, July 8, 2013

  • Colum McCann Uses Fiction to Access Texture of History
    Frederick Douglass traveling through Ireland in 1845; the first non-stop flight across the Atlantic in 1919; Sen. George Mitchell in 1998 trying to forge peace in Northern Ireland. Those actual people and events are at the heart of a the new novel "TransAtlantic." Author Colum McCann talks to Jeffrey Brown about his latest book.
    Original Air Date: July 8, 2013
  • Train Crash Leaves Impact on the Small Canadian Community
    In Canada, a fiery oil tanker train derailment has so far claimed the lives of 13 people, while 37 people remain missing, some of whom may never be found. Hari Sreenivasan talks to Sophie Tremblay of the Canadian Broadcasting Company, about how the accident may prompt debate about the safety of oil pipelines.
    Original Air Date: July 8, 2013
  • U.S. Fed Up With Chinese Cyber Theft, Say Analysts
    As U.S. and Chinese officials meet this week in Washington to discuss cyber issues -- as well as broader strategic and economic issues -- a number of Congress members and computer security experts say they are fed up with China stealing proprietary data from American companies.
    Original Air Date: July 8, 2013

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