Wednesday, April 11, 2012

  • "Dying Green" Explores Conservation Through Natural Burial
    A new documentary explores environmentally friendly burial - and how it can be used to conserve land - by following a pioneer of the movement, Dr. Billy Campbell. Hari Sreenivasan recently sat down with Dr. Campbell and the filmmaker, Ellen Tripler, to find out more about the practice.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2012
  • Political Checklist: The General Election Begins
    Political editor Christina Bellantoni chats with senior correspondent Judy Woodruff about Rick Santorum dropping out of the race for the Republican presidential nomination and the start of the general election contest between presumed nominee Mitt Romney and President Obama.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2012
  • Introduction to CoCoRaHS
    A brief introduction to Community Collaborative Rain Hail and Snow Network, a grassroots volunteer organization that measures and track precipitation.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2012

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

  • 'Tinderbox': How Colonialism Shaped the HIV/AIDS Epidemic
    Ray Suarez speaks with authors Craig Timberg and Daniel Halperin about how "shadows of colonialism" hang over the spread of HIV from Africa. The topic is explored in their book "Tinderbox: How the West Sparked the AIDS Epidemic and How the World Can Finally Overcome it."
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2012
  • California Community Colleges Face Tighter Budgets
    With 2.6 million students, California's community colleges make up the largest higher educational system in the country. Spencer Michels reports on the system's efforts to reshape its future as budget problems have forced the state to cut back support and tuition hikes have sparked student protests.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2012
  • Obama Renews Push for Buffett Rule
    President Obama renewed a call for higher taxes on the wealthy Tuesday, urging Congress to adopt the so-called "Buffett Rule" and impose a minimum 30 percent income tax on those earning $1 million or more a year. Jeffrey Brown gets perspectives from the White House's Gene Sperling and American Action Forum's Douglas Holtz-Eakin.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2012
  • Santorum Bows Out: What's Next for Him, Obama, Republicans?
    "While this presidential race for us is over," Rick Santorum said Tuesday in Gettysburg, Pa., announcing his campaign's suspension, "we are not done fighting." Judy Woodruff, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette's Jim O'Toole and USA Today's Susan Page discuss his political future and what comes next in the race for the White House.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2012
  • Rick Santorum Speech Announcing Withdrawal From President
    Speaking in the state that he used to represent in the Senate, Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum told supporters in Gettysburg, Pa., that he's suspending his campaign ahead of the Pennsylvania primary. "Against all odds, we won 11 states, millions of voters, millions of votes," Santorum said. "We found that support. I found a deeper love for this country."
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2012

Monday, April 9, 2012

  • 18th Century Japanese Scrolls Make Rare U.S. Appearance
    In a rare U.S. visit, a collection of 30 Japanese bird-and-flower silk scroll paintings by Ito Jakuchu are on display at the National Gallery of Art, just in time for the National Cherry Blossom Festival in the nation's capital. Judy Woodruff reports on the display of the 18th century Japanese national treasures.
    Original Air Date: April 9, 2012
  • Remembering Mike Wallace, Legendary '60 Minutes' Icon
    A Mike Wallace interview was often harsh, unsympathetic even. The "60 Minutes" icon was never reluctant to confront the feared or the famous -- from Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini to Malcolm X to pitcher Roger Clemens. Wallace, 93, died Saturday. Morley Safer and Jeff Fager of CBS reflect on Wallace's career with Jeffrey Brown.
    Original Air Date: April 9, 2012
  • March Shattered Temperature Records Across U.S.
    A day-by-day animation of the daily temperature records tied or broken in March 2012. Over 15,000 records were broken.
    Original Air Date: April 9, 2012
  • U.S., Brazil 'Disagree More Than They Agree,' Analyst Says
    Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff's visit to the White House Monday was staged to stress strong ties between the U.S. and Latin America's richest country. Rousseff and President Obama touched on issues of cooperation, including education, energy and trade while ignoring areas of disagreement. Margaret Warner reports.
    Original Air Date: April 9, 2012
  • How Trayvon Martin Case Could Affect Stand Your Ground Laws
    A grand jury will not investigate the death of Trayvon Martin -- the unarmed black teenager shot in a gated community in February, a special prosecutor said Monday. Gwen Ifill and Daniel Webster of Johns Hopkins' Center for Gun Policy and Research discuss the case's potential effects on other states' "stand your ground" laws.
    Original Air Date: April 9, 2012
  • Syria's Cross-Border Violence May Be No Accident
    As Kofi Annan's peace plan for Syria falls apart, the conflict escalated Monday as the Syrian army fired into a Turkish refugee camp, wounding at least five people. Also, in Lebanon, a cameraman was reportedly shot and killed by Syrian soldiers. Borzou Daragahi of the Financial Times gives Jeffrey Brown an update from Beirut.
    Original Air Date: April 9, 2012
  • Weekly Poem: Katherine Larson Reads 'Metamorphosis'
    Katherine Larson won the 2010 Yale Younger Poets Prize and the 2012 Kate Tufts Discovery Award for her book "Radial Symmetry." She is also the recipient of a Ruth Lilly Poetry Fellowship.
    Original Air Date: April 9, 2012

Friday, April 6, 2012

  • Buddy Guy: 'Blues Musicians Don't Retire, They Drop'
    Sixty years after picking up his first guitar, blues musician Buddy Guy still jams -- and has no plans of stopping. Jeffrey Brown and Guy discuss his upcoming memoir "When I Left Home: My Story," his childhood in rural Louisiana, what his influences were and how his remarkable career helped shape popular music.
    Original Air Date: April 6, 2012
  • Shields, Ponnuru on U.S. Economy, Santorum's Standing in GOP
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and the National Review's Ramesh Ponnuru, sitting in for David Brooks, discuss the week's top news including a weaker-than expected March jobs report, American economic attitudes, Mitt Romney's polling problems, Rick Santorum's standing in the GOP and presidential pressure on the Supreme Court.
    Original Air Date: April 6, 2012
  • Metaphor vs. Malice on NFL Sidelines
    The NFL's so-called bounty scandal deepened Thursday when audio surfaced of a former New Orleans Saints coach encouraging players to injure specific opponents during a playoff game. Jeffrey Brown discusses the latest revelations and the fallout with The Washington Post's Mike Wise and Northeastern University's Dan Lebowitz.
    Original Air Date: April 6, 2012
  • Why Job Seekers, Employers Aren't Connecting
    The U.S. job market appears to have a paradox: Many job seekers say they're desperate for work while many employers say they can't fill open positions. Are workers being too picky? Are employers being too cheap? Correspondent Paul Solman explores what's behind the disconnect as part of his Making Sen$e of financial news series.
    Original Air Date: April 6, 2012
  • Jobs Report Prompts More Questions Over Size of Labor Force
    New jobs numbers released Friday showed unemployment ticking down to 8.2 percent, the lowest since January 2009, despite only 121,000 jobs added in March. Judy Woodruff and The Economist's Greg Ip discuss what's behind the weaker-than-expected report and why many Americans appear to be dropping out of the labor force altogether.
    Original Air Date: April 6, 2012
  • Need to Know: Philadelphia's 'Project U-Turn' Eyes Dropouts
    On Friday's Need to Know, our public media colleagues tell the story of Justin Rudd, a high school dropout who lived on the streets of Philadelphia - a city where roughly forty percent of ninth-graders don't mange to graduate in four years.
    Original Air Date: April 6, 2012
  • 'In Performance at the White House: Red, White and Blues'
    Earlier this year, Buddy Guy performed with other musicians at a celebration of the blues as part of PBS' "In Performance at the White House" series. Guy coaxed President Obama to sing a bit of "Sweet Home Chicago."
    Original Air Date: April 6, 2012
  • Buddy Guy at Legends
    On many nights, Buddy Guy jumps on stage at his club Legends in Chicago to tell a few stories and sing a few songs for delighted audiences. The NewsHour caught one of those moments.
    Original Air Date: April 6, 2012
  • Buddy Guy Plays His Guitar for the NewsHour
    Blues legend Buddy Guy is still jamming, six decades after first picking up a guitar. After his interview with Jeffrey Brown, Guy couldn't resist picking up a guitar and playing a bit for the NewsHour.
    Original Air Date: April 6, 2012
  • Conversation: Henry Ossawa Tanner
    Henry Ossawa Tanner is known as the first African-American artist to gain international success and fame. He was born in Pittsburgh in 1859, spent much of his youth in Philadelphia, but lived most of his adult life in Paris. More than 100 of his works appear in the exhibition, "Henry Ossawa Tanner: Modern Spirit," at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts.
    Original Air Date: April 6, 2012

Thursday, April 5, 2012

  • Examining Social Media Campaign Culture on Pinterest
    As part of an ongoing series on how candidates and surrogates are using social media this election season, Margaret Warner and journalists Lauren Ashburn and Howard Kurtz of the Daily Download discuss how Ann Romney and President Obama have used the virtual bulletin board Pinterest to reach out to voters, especially female ones.
    Original Air Date: April 5, 2012
  • For Media Industry, Some Hope as Mobile Consumption Grows
    As more Americans use mobile devices and social media to consume their news, the appeal of traditional news outlets is up, according to a new report from the Pew Research Center that scrutinizes the industry's health. Judy Woodruff and the Center's Mark Jurkowitz discuss some encouraging developments amid ongoing industry woes.
    Original Air Date: April 5, 2012
  • In Uganda, Gays Face Growing Social, Legal Hostility
    Being gay is extremely taboo in deeply religious Uganda, where one tabloid urged the hanging of people it called the country's "top homos." Fred de Sam Lazaro reports how the re-emergence of a bill to impose severe penalties for homosexuality, including death in some cases, has brought more rebuke from Western donor nations.
    Original Air Date: April 5, 2012

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