Friday, October 18, 2013

  • Detroit's InsideOut students and alumni perform their poetry
    Detroit's InsideOut student Patty Lare and alumni Terrell Morrow and Justin Rogers perform their poetry at the Dell Pryor art gallery.
    Original Air Date: October 18, 2013
  • Glitches persist for online insurance exchange shoppers
    Beset with glitches and registration problems, the launch of the online insurance exchanges at the start of October were rockier than expected. For an update on the status of the site and user experiences, Ray Suarez talks to Sarah Kliff of The Washington Post and Louise Radnofsky of The Wall Street Journal.
    Original Air Date: October 18, 2013
  • News Wrap: Saudi Arabia rebukes UN Security Council
    In our news wrap Friday, Saudi Arabia accused the UN Security Council of failing to resolve conflicts like the civil war in Syria, and appeared to reject its newly acquired seat on the body. Also, one of the gunmen in the Nairobi mall attack has been identified as a Norwegian citizen originally from Somalia.
    Original Air Date: October 18, 2013
  • President Obama taps Jeh Johnson to head Homeland Security
    President Barack Obama nominated Jeh Johnson to lead the Department of Homeland Security Friday afternoon.
    Original Air Date: October 18, 2013
  • Jonathan Lethem on American Communism in 'Dissident Gardens'
    Jeffrey Brown talks to author Jonathan Lethem about his look at American Communists in his new novel, 'Dissident Gardens.'
    Original Air Date: October 18, 2013
  • Jonathan Lethem reads an excerpt from 'Dissident Gardens'
    Jonathan Lethem reads an excerpt from his new novel, 'Dissident Gardens.'
    Original Air Date: October 18, 2013

Thursday, October 17, 2013

  • A look at political brinkmanship past and present
    Fundamental disagreement is an expected occurrence in Congress, but lately crises have come in increasing frequency. Jeffrey Brown speaks with Eric Liu of Citizen University, Steven Hayward of the University of Colorado, Boulder, and Beverly Gage of Yale University for a closer look at polarized American politics.
    Original Air Date: October 17, 2013
  • Will Facebook change erode privacy rights for teens?
    Privacy settings on Facebook will now allow users aged 13-17 to share posts with people outside their friend network. Will the change help teens express themselves or lead to problems like cyberbullying? Hari Sreenivasan speaks with Stephen Balkam of the Family Online Safety Institute and Jim Steyer of Common Sense Media.
    Original Air Date: October 17, 2013
  • Gun safety advocates support 'smart' firearms
    New guns that won't fire for anyone who hasn't been authorized are on their way to the market. Proponents of these "smart" firearms say they can prevent accidental deaths, but gun rights activists say additional safety feature aren't necessary. Ray Suarez reports on the new technology in the gun debate.
    Original Air Date: October 17, 2013
  • Analysts warn uncertainty from shutdown may spook consumers
    While Congress engaged in a budget showdown, workers' pay was delayed, tourism money lost and small business loans put on hold. Judy Woodruff talks to Sylvia Burwell of the Office of Management and Budget, plus Beth Ann Bovino of Standard & Poor's and Mark Zandi of Moody's Analytics offer insight on broader potential impact.
    Original Air Date: October 17, 2013
  • Senator-elect Booker on legislative priorities
    Newark Mayor Cory Booker will be New Jersey's first African-American senator, having been elected to fill the U.S. Senate seat of the late Frank Lautenberg. Gwen Ifill talks to Booker about his win, his legislative priorities and how he plans to pursue "uncommon coalitions for uncommon results" with his fellow lawmakers.
    Original Air Date: October 17, 2013
  • News Wrap: CIA uses NSA data to carry out drone strikes
    In our news wrap Thursday, new revelations from documents leaked by Edward Snowden show the CIA relies heavily on the NSA's ability to gather data to track down terrorists and carry out drone strikes abroad. Also, President Obama plans to nominate former Pentagon lawyer Jeh Johnson to lead the Department of Homeland Security.
    Original Air Date: October 17, 2013
  • Short-term spending deal reopens government
    The U.S. government went back to work after Congress passed a bill that ended a 16-day shutdown and temporarily raised the debt ceiling. President Obama called on lawmakers to work together, while a small budget group began meeting in hopes of reaching a long-term solution. Congressional correspondent Kwame Holman reports.
    Original Air Date: October 17, 2013
  • Nicky Nodjoumi's Art in Exile
    Nicky Nodjoumi’s artwork walks a fine line between art and politics. After the ousting of the Shah in 1979, the new Khomeini regime began strictly regulating artistic expression. Nodjoumi was exiled after a Tehrab exhibition in 1980."They saw the show and they labeled me as anti-revolution, anti-Khomeini, and anti-regime."
    Original Air Date: October 17, 2013
  • President Obama Addresses Federal Workers After Shutdown
    At the White House Thursday, President Barack Obama spoke to an audience of federal workers and press. The president signed a measured early Thursday morning that reopened the government after over two weeks of a partial shutdown.
    Original Air Date: October 17, 2013

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

  • Stanley Crouch recounts rise of Charlie 'Bird' Parker
    Jazz great and sax player Charlie "Bird" Parker was remarkable for his speed, listening and improvisational intuition. Jeffrey Brown talks to author Stanley Crouch about his new biography, "Kansas City Lightning: The Rise and Times of Charlie Parker."
    Original Air Date: October 16, 2013
  • What parameters are guiding nuclear talks with Iran?
    While two-day talks in Geneva over Iran's nuclear program entered "new territory" of negotiations and heralded a change in tone and pragmatism, no major breakthroughs have been made. What issues may prove to be major sticking points? Ray Suarez talks to Michael Gordon of The New York Times.
    Original Air Date: October 16, 2013
  • New Mexicans weigh slaughter of overpopulated wild horses
    Large herds of wild horses roam the American Southwest, but overpopulation is putting a strain on resources and threatening the livelihood of farmers and ranchers. In New Mexico, some argue the solution is to reopen horse slaughterhouses in the U.S., but opponents say the practice is inhumane. Hari Sreenivasan reports.
    Original Air Date: October 16, 2013
  • Italy's PM Letta: 'American leadership is needed' for Europe
    As Congress narrows in on an end to the shutdown, the rest of the world is watching their actions closely. Judy Woodruff talks to Italian Prime Minister Enrico Letta about the importance of a U.S. budget deal on international market stability, the ongoing Euro crisis recovery and Italy's next move on immigration reform.
    Original Air Date: October 16, 2013
  • GOP 'picked a fight that they couldn't win,' Dems reunited
    What are the practical and political outcomes of the 16-day stalemate in Congress that's finally drawing to a close? Although the GOP retained sequester spending levels, Democrats come out "energized and unified." Judy Woodruff talks to Stuart Rothenberg of the Rothenberg Political Report and Susan Page of USA Today.
    Original Air Date: October 16, 2013
  • Sen. Ted Cruz says he won't delay vote on debt deal
    Prominent tea party lawmaker, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), said he opposed the bipartisan debt deal, but will not delay its passage.
    Original Air Date: October 16, 2013
  • Reid, McConnell announce deal on Senate floor
    Senate leaders announced last-minute agreement Wednesday to avert a threatened Treasury default and reopen the government after a partial, 16-day shutdown. Congress raced to pass the measure by day's end.The Dow Jones industrial average soared on the news that the threat of default was fading, flirting with a 200-point gain in morning trading.
    Original Air Date: October 16, 2013

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

  • Haunting 'what-if' in novel on the JFK assassination
    What if the glass bubble top on the car in which President John F. Kennedy was riding in Dallas had not been removed by a Secret Service agent? The NewsHour's own Jim Lehrer explores that idea in "Top Down: A Novel of the Kennedy Assassination." Jim joins Judy Woodruff to discuss his personal experience that inspired the book.
    Original Air Date: October 15, 2013
  • Afghan war hero awarded Medal of Honor for brave actions
    President Obama awarded former Army Captain William Swenson the Medal of Honor for his brave actions to aid his fellow soldiers when his unit was ambushed by the Taliban in Afghanistan. For insight on the controversy surrounding Swenson's nomination, Ray Suarez speaks with David Nakamora of The Washington Post.
    Original Air Date: October 15, 2013
  • Model school trains teachers in ABCs of reading instruction
    Learning to read is the essential foundation of elementary education, but it's also very complex and many students in America are falling behind. John Tulenko of Learning Matters reports on one model school that has re-trained teachers in hands-on skills and strategies and has dramatically improved proficiency scores.
    Original Air Date: October 15, 2013
  • Bond market braces for U.S. debt ceiling deadline
    If lawmakers fail to avert a debt default, there could be a devastating impact on the national economy: mortgages soaring, consumers unable to borrow, the government forced to pay more to borrow more, plunging us deeper into debt. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports on how the bond market is anticipating the situation.
    Original Air Date: October 15, 2013
  • Prohibiting affirmative action violates equal protection?
    The Supreme Court heard arguments on whether Michigan voters can pass a law that prohibits racial preference in college admissions. Gwen Ifill gets background from Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal, plus views from Lee Bollinger of Columbia University and Joshua Thompson, an attorney with the Pacific Legal Foundation.
    Original Air Date: October 15, 2013
  • News Wrap: Al-Libi pleads not guilty to planning bombings
    In our news wrap Tuesday, Abu Anas al-Libi pleaded not guilty in an arraignment in New York on charges of planning the 1998 bombings of two U.S. embassies in East Africa that killed 220 people. Also, The Washington Post reported that the NSA has collected millions of contact lists from e-mail and online chats.
    Original Air Date: October 15, 2013

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