Wednesday, December 21, 2011

  • Democrats Pressure House GOP to Back Down on Payroll Tax Cut
    Republicans and Democrats mired in a stalemate over extending the payroll tax cut Wednesday. Judy Woodruff reports on House Speaker John Boehner's call to President Obama, and the White House's use of Facebook and Twitter to leverage support for extending the tax break.
    Original Air Date: December 21, 2011
  • News Wrap: Syrian Dissidents Report More Than 100 Killed by Government Forces
    In other news Wednesday, Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki demanded that Kurdish authorities hand over Vice President Tariq Al-Hashemi, who fled to the Kurdish North this week to escape an arrest warrant. In Syria, dissidents reported government forces killed more than 100 people in an organized massacre.
    Original Air Date: December 21, 2011
  • Bank of America to Pay $335M to Settle Countrywide Case of Alleged Racial Bias
    Bank of America agreed to pay a $335 million settlement Wednesday over alleged claims of racial bias in home mortgage lending involving Countrywide Mortgage, which the bank bought in 2008. Jeffrey Brown discusses the investigation and settlement with Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan.
    Original Air Date: December 21, 2011
  • Poet Mark Doty Reflects on a Community Uniting to Peform Handel's Messiah
    Poet Mark Doty reads a piece that looks upon a great Christmas tradition that comes in the form of a community coming together to sing Handel's 'Messiah'.
    Original Air Date: December 21, 2011
  • Poet Mark Doty Reads 'A Display of Mackerel'
    Mark Doty reads his poem, "A Display of Mackerel."
    Original Air Date: December 21, 2011
  • The Year in Fiction
    Jeffrey Brown talks to book critic Ron Charles of the Washington Post about the year in fiction.
    Original Air Date: December 21, 2011
    December 21, 2011

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

  • Film Tells Story of Warlord-Turned-Evangelist Known as General Butt Naked
    The film "The Redemption of General Butt Naked" follows a brutal African warlord who has renounced his violent past and reinvented himself as a Christian evangelist. This excerpt is part of The Economist Film Project series of independently produced films aired in partnership between The Economist and the NewsHour.
    Original Air Date: December 20, 2011
  • How Does North Korea Stay So Secretive?
    The fact that U.S. intelligence apparently didn't notice the death of Kim Jong-il for 48 hours is a demonstration of how impenetrable North Korea continues to be. Margaret Warner discusses the mysterious nation with former senior CIA and State Department intelligence analyst Robert Carlin, now at Stanford University.
    Original Air Date: December 20, 2011
  • Does Maliki Want to Become Unchallenged Ruler of Iraq?
    The last U.S. convoy had hardly crossed into Kuwait on Sunday when Iraq was thrust into new and potentially dangerous political turmoil. Judy Woodruff discusses the country's latest political crisis with the Naval Postgraduate School's Abbas Kadhim and Feisal Istrabadi of Indiana University.
    Original Air Date: December 20, 2011
  • Ahead of Iowa Caucuses, Gingrich's Momentum Fades as Criticism Mounts
    The Republican presidential race has turned into a national dead heat, especially in Iowa where the first votes will be cast in two weeks. Gwen Ifill discusses the candidates' momentum with Stuart Rothenberg of the Rothenberg Political Report and USA Today's Susan Page.
    Original Air Date: December 20, 2011
  • In Washington, a Familiar Showdown, but 'People Are Dug in Much Deeper'
    President Obama and House Speaker John Boehner dug in their heels Tuesday and refused to break a stalemate over extending a payroll tax cut after the House balked at approving a two-month extension. Jeffrey Brown discusses the latest back-and-forth between Democrats and Republicans with Todd Zwillich of WYNC's "The Takeaway."
    Original Air Date: December 20, 2011

Monday, December 19, 2011

  • Protestors and Police Clash Anew in Cairo
    A police crackdown on protestors in Cairo, during the second stage of Egypt's election, led to the most-violent episodes yet in the post-Mubarak era. Margaret Warner gets the latest from The New York Times' David Kirkpatrick, who has been covering the unrest on Egypt's streets.
    Original Air Date: December 19, 2011
  • Madeleine Albright on Vaclav Havel's 'Massive Moral Authority, Great Courage'
    Thousands of Czechs braved the freezing cold Monday in Prague to pay their respects to former President Vaclav Havel, who died Sunday at age 75. Judy Woodruff discusses the extraordinary life of the writer, dissident and president with former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright.
    Original Air Date: December 19, 2011
  • California Hospital Chain Eyed for Possibly Bilking Medicare for Millions
    Americans spends more than $500 billion every year on Medicare, and as the cost of health care rises, many are examining how that money is spent. NewsHour's partner The Center for Investigative Reporting conducted a year-long probe into one prominent hospital chain's bills to Medicare. California Watch's Lance Williams reports.
    Original Air Date: December 19, 2011
  • White House, GOP Ratchet Up Rhetoric on 'Repsonsible' Deal for Payroll Tax Cut
    The way forward on extending the payroll tax cut remained murky Monday as House Republicans vowed to turn back a compromise measure passed by the Senate over the weekend. Gwen Ifill discusses the stalemate with Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, and Gene Sperling, a senior economic adviser to President Obama.
    Original Air Date: December 19, 2011
  • If Kim Jong-un Fails to Control Arsenal, North Korea Could Be 'Truly Terrifying'
    Longtime North Korean leader Kim Jong-il died early Saturday after reportedly suffering a heart attack as he toured the country. Jeffrey Brown discusses Kim's reign and what his son, Kim Jong-un, will face as its new leader with Dartmouth College's Jennifer Lind and the Center for Strategic and International Studies' Victor Cha.
    Original Air Date: December 19, 2011
  • After Kim Jong-il's Death, North Korea Marks Hereditary Passage of Power
    North Korea marked the passing of power Monday to a scion of the same family that's ruled unchallenged since World War II. Jeffrey Brown reports on Kim Jong-il's 17-year reign and the political expectations for Kim Jong-un, his third son.
    Original Air Date: December 19, 2011
  • A Warlord's Quest for Forgiveness in 'The Redemption of General Butt Naked'
    On Tuesday's NewsHour, an excerpt of "The Redemption of General Butt Naked" will air as part of The Economist Film Project. The film follows Joshua Milton Blahyi, aka General Butt Naked, an African warlord renounced his violent past to become a Christian evangelist seeking forgiveness from his victims. Filmmakers Eric Strauss and Daniele Anastasion talk with NewsHour about making the film.
    Original Air Date: December 19, 2011
  • Weekly Poem: '4th Grade Logic'
    P.F. Potvin is the author of "The Attention Lesson" (2006, No Tell Books). He serves on the staff of the online literary journal Drunken Boat. and has been a visiting writer at Emory University and the University of Michigan-Dearborn.
    Original Air Date: December 19, 2011

Friday, December 16, 2011

  • In Anthonogy, Rita Dove Connects American Poets' Intergenerational Conversations
    Former U.S. Poet Laureate Rita Dove was recently given what may be the biggest honor -- and challenge -- of her career: sorting through poems from the last 100 years to create "The Penguin Anthology of 20th Century American Poetry." Jeffrey Brown and Dove discuss the task that took more than four years.
    Original Air Date: December 16, 2011
  • Shields, Brooks on Iowa Debate, 'Rattling Sabers' Over Iran, Iraq War's Legacy
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks discuss the week's top political news, including the latest GOP presidential debate in Iowa, candidates' views on how the U.S. should deal with Iran, more brinksmanship in Congress and the formal end of the American involvement in the Iraq War.
    Original Air Date: December 16, 2011
  • Ahead of Iowa Caucuses, it Could Still Be Anyone's Game in GOP
    On the heels of Thursday night's Republican presidential debate in Sioux City, Iowa, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney scored an endorsement from South Carolina's governor. Hari Sreenivasan reports on the latest in the race for the GOP nomination.
    Original Air Date: December 16, 2011
  • In Manning Trial, Tracing WikiLeaks Files to Harm May Be 'Extremely Complicated'
    Friday was the first court appearance for Army Pvt. Bradley Manning, accused as the prime source for the WikiLeaks document dumps. Ray Suarez discusses the day's proceedings with Arun Rath of PBS' "Frontline."
    Original Air Date: December 16, 2011
  • GOP Insistence on Pipeline Provision Could Derail Spending Bill
    The House passed a $1 trillion spending bill Friday to fund much of the government through next September and avoid a federal shutdown this weekend, but both parties remain split over how to extend a payroll tax cut. Jim Lehrer reports.
    Original Air Date: December 16, 2011
  • Former Fannie, Freddie Officials Face 'Significant' Fraud, Lying Charges
    The Securities and Exchange Commission has charged six former Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac officials with misleading investors about risky loans. Judy Woodruff discusses how the alleged wrongdoings may have contributed to the mortgage meltdown with Edward Pinto of the American Enterprise Institute and Lynn Turner of LitiNomics.
    Original Air Date: December 16, 2011
  • Extended Interview: Rita Dove
    Jeffrey Brown talks to poet Rita Dove.
    Original Air Date: December 16, 2011
  • Rita Dove Reads Two Poems
    Rita Dive reads "Singsong" and "Fox Trot Fridays."
    Original Air Date: December 16, 2011
    December 16, 2011
  • Rita Dove Shows Off Her Dance Moves
    Aside from poetry, ballroom dancing is one of Rita Dove's passions. Here, she dances with her husband, Fred Viebahn.
    Original Air Date: December 16, 2011

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