Monday, August 12, 2013

  • Russia's Anti-Gay Laws Are Part of Larger National Crackdown
    As Russia gears up to host the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, it has also ramped up anti-gay laws, generating international protest. To examine the restrictions and the backlash, as well as the significance of the upcoming Olympic games for Russia, Gwen Ifill sits down with Miriam Lanskoy of the National Endowment for Democracy.
    Original Air Date: August 12, 2013
  • News Wrap: NYC's 'Stop and Frisk' Policy Is Discriminatory
    In other news Monday, a federal judge ruled that New York City's "Stop and Frisk" policy "intentionally discriminates based on race" by stopping mostly black and Hispanic men. Also, with the exception of the U.S. embassy in Yemen, all U.S. diplomatic posts that were closed last week due to a terror threat have re-opened.
    Original Air Date: August 12, 2013
  • Holder Calls for New Approach to Low-Level Drug Crimes
    Nearly half of the nation's prisoners are serving time for drug related crimes. Judy Woodruff gets debate from Mary Price of Families Against Mandatory Minimums and William Otis of Georgetown Law School on Attorney General Eric Holder's push to scale back mandatory minimum sentences for low-level, non-violent drug offenders.
    Original Air Date: August 12, 2013
  • NYC Mayor Bloomberg Plans to Appeal Stop-and-Frisk Decision
    U.S. District Court Judge Shira Scheindlin ruled Monday that the NYPD's stop-and-frisk practice was unconstitutional, unfairly targeting minorities. Hours following the ruling, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg said the city would appeal the decision and that the ruling is "a very dangerous decision made by a judge that, I think, does not understand how policing works."
    Original Air Date: August 12, 2013
  • Watch AG Eric Holder Announce New "Smart" Plan on Crime
    Attorney General Eric Holder announced the Justice Department's plan to no longer pursue mandatory minimum prison sentences for non-violent drug offenders. Holder said that certain "drug offenders who have no ties to large-scale organizations, gangs, or cartels will no longer be charged with offenses that impose draconian mandatory minimum sentences."
    Original Air Date: August 12, 2013

Friday, August 9, 2013

  • We're Not Kid-ding: Goats Graze Historic Capitol Hill
    Washington is known for its donkeys and elephants, but with Congress on recess, a new herd has taken over the Hill. Goats have been hired as a clean-up crew at the historic but overgrown Congressional Cemetery, feasting on an all-you-can-eat buffet of poison ivy and kudzu. Kwame Holman reports.
    Original Air Date: August 9, 2013
  • Brooks and Marcus on Obama's Surveillance Stance
    New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Ruth Marcus join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week's top political news, including President Barack Obama's remarks on government surveillance programs, the state of U.S.-Russian relations, and the significance of the sale of the Washington Post.
    Original Air Date: August 9, 2013
  • U.S. Looks for Interest From Russia in Working Together
    U.S. officials attempted to make progress in high-level talks with their Russian counterparts on issues including Edward Snowden's asylum, missile defense and Syria. Margaret Warner explains to Jeffrey Brown that although the talks were a step towards better relations with Russia, "no breakthrough" was made.
    Original Air Date: August 9, 2013
  • Obama Vows More Transparency in Surveillance Programs
    In a formal White House news conference, President Barack Obama defended government surveillance programs, stating they will continue but with added oversight. He outlined a series of four reforms in an effort to provide more transparency and better safeguards. Judy Woodruff offers excerpts from the president's remarks.
    Original Air Date: August 9, 2013
  • The March on Washington at 50: What is its Relevance Today?
    This year marks the 50th anniversary of the famed March on Washington. On Aug. 28, 1963, more than 200,000 people traveled to the nation's capital to participate in the “March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.” PBS NewsHour senior correspondent Jeffrey Brown asked a panel of historians to give their take on the iconic American event and its relevance today.
    Original Air Date: August 9, 2013
  • Elders Get a CAPABLE Hand in Shoring Up Home Safety
    CAPABLE is a Baltimore-based project that offers help from occupational therapists, nurses and handymen to low-income older adults to “age in place.”
    Original Air Date: August 9, 2013
  • Detroit Residents Try to Turn Around Slow Decline
    A lack of basic social services and abandoned blocks are just a few of the side effects Detroit citizens face due to their city's financial woes. But in some neighborhoods, Motor City residents are taking revitalization efforts into their own hands. Hari Sreenivasan reports on the resilience of the people who call Detroit home.
    Original Air Date: August 9, 2013

Thursday, August 8, 2013

  • Do Apps That Advertise Learning Make Your Baby Smarter?
    Need to entertain your baby? There's an app for that. But whether or not mobile device applications are actually educating your baby is under debate. An advocacy group has filed a federal complaint with the Federal Trade Commission. Jeffrey Brown talks to Dr. Michael Rich of Boston Children's Hospital.
    Original Air Date: August 8, 2013
  • 'Collision 2012,' a Look at Forces That Shaped the Election
    Months after the re-election of President Barack Obama, Dan Balz of the Washington Post examines the 2012 election and aftermath in his new book "Collision 2012: Obama vs. Romney and the Future of Elections in America." Balz joins Gwen Ifill to discuss significant moments in each campaign and why it may shape elections to come.
    Original Air Date: August 8, 2013
  • Seniors Hold on to Urban Independence Into Old Age
    A new community model lets seniors enjoy all of the security and social amenities of a retirement community without leaving their homes. The alternative is called "aging in place." Ray Suarez reports on how this village concept may help seniors retain their independence into their golden years.
    Original Air Date: August 8, 2013
  • Henrietta Lacks' 'Immortal' Impact on Medical Research
    Henrietta Lacks died 62 years ago, but her cells -- known as HeLa -- live on through scientific research, having led to world-changing medical advances for decades. Margaret Warner talks to Dr. Francis Collins of the National Institutes of Health about a new agreement made with the Lacks' family over control of her DNA legacy.
    Original Air Date: August 8, 2013
  • Fukushima Reinforces Worst Fears for Japanese
    How are the Japanese people reacting to the news of the continuing contamination leak and what does it mean for Japan's energy policy? Jeffrey Brown talks with Arjun Makhijani of the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research and Kenji Kushida of Stanford University about what the government may do to stop the flow.
    Original Air Date: August 8, 2013

Wednesday, August 7, 2013

  • 'Fruitvale Station' Recalls Real Drama of Man's Final Hours
    "Fruitvale Station," a new film by Ryan Coogler, tells the story of Oscar Grant: a young, black Oakland man who was shot and killed on a train platform by a Bay Area Regional Transit police officer. Gwen Ifill speaks with writer and director Coogler on his motivation for making the film and coincidental timing of its release.
    Original Air Date: August 7, 2013
  • Tempers May Flare as Climate Change Heats Up, Study Finds
    A new study shows that changes in the climate also affect human behavior. According to researchers, even slight increases in temperature and rainfall correlate to increased levels of violence. Ray Suarez discusses the findings with study lead author Solomon Hsiang of the University of California, Berkeley.
    Original Air Date: August 7, 2013
  • Limited Funds, Lingering Bias Has Delayed ADA Compliance
    George H.W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act into law in 1990, but more than two decades later, problems still persist in implementing portions of the landmark civil rights measure. Judy Woodruff reports on the struggle states face to fully transition individuals with disabilities out of institutional living.
    Original Air Date: August 7, 2013
  • Obama Supports Role for Government to Reform Mortgages
    President Barack Obama vowed to push Congress to reform American housing policy. A current Senate plan would wind down the role played by Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae. Margaret Warner sits down with Guy Cecala, publisher of Inside Mortgage Finance, to understand how the proposal would change the lending landscape.
    Original Air Date: August 7, 2013
  • White House Takes Stock of Russia Relationship After Snowden
    President Barack Obama cancelled a September summit with Russia's President Vladimir Putin amid disappointment over Edward Snowden's asylum. Jeffrey Brown turns to Stephen Sestanovich of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Center for the National Interest's Dimitri Simes for more on the state of U.S.-Russian relations.
    Original Air Date: August 7, 2013
  • Hellbender Salamander Returning to Its Rock
    Underwater footage of a hellbender salamander returning to its rock. Video by Kim Terrell, Smithsonian's National Zoo.
    Original Air Date: August 7, 2013

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

  • Hellbender Salamander Returning to Its Rock
    Underwater footage of a hellbender salamander returning to its rock. Shot by Kim Terrell, Smithsonian's National Zoo.
    Original Air Date: August 6, 2013
  • Syrian Refugee Camp Takes on 'Air of Permanence'
    The second largest refugee camp in the world, home to 120,000 people, is in Jordan, flocked to by Syrians displaced by the civil war. Lindsey Hilsum of Independent Television News spends a day in the camp known as Zaatari, where residents cope with difficult conditions and feel little hope for returning home in the near future.
    Original Air Date: August 6, 2013
  • Deputy Defense Secretary: Spending Must Be Strategic
    The Pentagon has completed a review of how to cut spending under the constraints imposed by sequestration. Ray Suarez sits down with Deputy Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter to discuss the challenge of protecting the nation from the threats it faces today while also preparing for "the problems that will define our future."
    Original Air Date: August 6, 2013
  • Fort Hood Suspect: 'I Am the Shooter'
    A court martial is underway for suspected shooter Nidal Hasan, on trial for opening fire at Fort Hood and killing 13 people in 2009. Hasan, representing himself, said in his opening statement, "The evidence will clearly show that I am the shooter." Margaret Warner talks with Molly Hennessy-Fiske of the Los Angeles Times.
    Original Air Date: August 6, 2013
  • 'Our Future Is Digital': Don Graham on Washington Post
    The purchase of The Washington Post by Internet mogul Jeff Bezos for $250 million will end nearly eight decades of that newspaper's ownership by the Graham family. Donald Graham, chairman and CEO of the Washington Post Company, joins Gwen Ifill to discuss the sale and future of news media in an increasingly digital age.
    Original Air Date: August 6, 2013

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