Friday, October 25, 2013

  • Shields, Brooks on glitchy website, spying on friends
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week's top political news, including who's to blame for the launch of the glitchy health care website, how U.S. spying allegations may have damaged trust between the U.S. and its allies and soul-searching for the GOP.
    Original Air Date: October 25, 2013
  • Survivors of Sandy ditch N.Y. to prepare for doomsday
    Some Hurricane Sandy survivors have begun to study up on "doomsday prepping" in case another environmental disaster hits. City slickers by day, survivalists in the NYC Preppers Network head up to the Catskill Mountains on the weekends, armed with just the basics to practice living off the land. Paul Solman reports.
    Original Air Date: October 25, 2013
  • Shields, Brooks on Acela eavesdropping and the World Series
    When the stars line up and columnists Mark Shields and David Brooks, and Hari Sreenivasan can all be on the same space-time continuum, we join up for the Doubleheader.This week they begin with the eavesdropping incident heard around the Twittersphere. We move on to Stephen Colbert's suggestion that Shields and Brooks mud wrestle, plus the gentlemen's picks for the World Series.
    Original Air Date: October 25, 2013
  • FDA plan to limit painkillers may impact those who need them
    While millions of people use prescription painkillers for relief, their abuse has reached epidemic levels in some places. To combat rising addiction rates, the FDA has a new plan to limit the distribution of pain meds, specifically containing hydrocodone. Hari Sreenivasan gets more from Barry Meier of The New York Times.
    Original Air Date: October 25, 2013
  • How U.S. spying revelations affect diplomacy
    Revelations that the NSA has collected phone and email data from our European allies has created a "serious and awkward diplomatic problem" for the U.S. Former CIA official Philip Mudd and P.J. Crowley, former assistant secretary of state, join Ray Suarez to discuss the diplomatic ramifications.
    Original Air Date: October 25, 2013
  • Fallout from NSA leaks threaten trust at home and abroad
    The controversy unleashed by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden began in June when The Guardian newspaper first reported on leaks about U.S. monitoring of phone calls. Since then, information about the NSA's surveillance have threatened trust at home and relationships with U.S. allies abroad. Ray Suarez recaps the revelations.
    Original Air Date: October 25, 2013
  • News Wrap: HealthCare.gov official says glitches end by Nov.
    In our news wrap Friday, the spokesman for the insurance exchange website HealthCare.gov announced most of the tech troubles will be cleared up by the end of November. Also, demolition began at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., where a gunman killed 20 children and six adults last December.
    Original Air Date: October 25, 2013
  • Merkel, Hollande call for 'no spying' agreement with U.S.
    German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Francois Hollande called for a "no spying" agreement with the U.S. after reports that the NSA monitored and collected phone data from their countries. A State Department spokeswoman said the Obama administration is ready to discuss the issue. Kwame Holman reports.
    Original Air Date: October 25, 2013
  • Billy Collins reads 'Cheerios'
    Billy Collins reads a poem titled "Cheerios" from his new collection "Aimless Love."
    Original Air Date: October 25, 2013
  • Billy Collins on '"Aimless Love' and the humor in his poetry
    Billy Collins talks to NewsHour chief arts correspondent Jeffrey Brown about his new collection, "Aimless Love" and how he learned to include humor in his poetry.
    Original Air Date: October 25, 2013
  • Billy Collins reads "A Dog on His Master"
    Billy Collins reads "A Dog on His Master" from his new collection, " Aimless Love."
    Original Air Date: October 25, 2013

Thursday, October 24, 2013

  • Protesters resort to self-immolation over China development
    To keep up with the huge boom in urban development, China has knocked down villages to make way for new cities, sometimes without consent. When one farmer's demands for compensation were not met, he resorted to setting himself on fire, and he's not the only one to do so. Hari Sreenivasan gets details from Frank Langfitt of NPR.
    Original Air Date: October 24, 2013
  • GOP can gain from 'adhering to principles,' says Gillespie
    Despite the political hit Republicans took from the shutdown, former GOP chair Ed Gillespie is optimistic his party can make headway on issues like immigration reform and entitlements, and win back the majority if they can reduce friction in their coalition. Gwen Ifill talks to Gillespie about the outlook for the next election.
    Original Air Date: October 24, 2013
  • Parents study how to improve college prospects for kids
    While their elementary school-aged kids are being taught the basics of reading and math, some parents are learning how to prioritize their prospects for higher education. The NewsHour's April Brown reports on the "Parent College" program that is working to improve graduation rates for underprivileged students in Los Angeles.
    Original Air Date: October 24, 2013
  • EPA chief on maintaining a 'diverse energy mix' for America
    In June, the Obama administration called for new pollution standards for power plants, and the new EPA administrator, Gina McCarthy, has followed through with a proposal for new rules. Ray Suarez reports on pushback from the coal industry, while Judy Woodruff talks to McCarthy about pollution and energy priorities.
    Original Air Date: October 24, 2013
  • Merkel: U.S. spying on friends is 'not acceptable'
    At a European Union summit, German Chancellor Angela Merkel characterized the reported American monitoring of her cellphone as a "severe breach of trust." Jeffrey Brown gets background from Margaret Warner and Luke Baker of Reuters about how European leaders are responding to U.S. spying allegations.
    Original Air Date: October 24, 2013
  • HealthCare.gov contractors warned of glitches before launch
    The contractors behind the development of HealthCare.gov testified before a House committee that they warned officials the insurance exchange site was not properly tested before it went live. Meanwhile the White House announced that insurance seekers will now have until March 31 to sign up for coverage. Hari Sreenivasan reports.
    Original Air Date: October 24, 2013
  • News Wrap: President Obama pushes immigration reform
    In our news wrap Thursday, President Obama urged Congress to focus on passing immigration reform. Also, two people have tested positive for polio in Syria in the first outbreak of the crippling disease there in 14 years.
    Original Air Date: October 24, 2013
  • EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy on climate change
    PBS NewsHour’s Judy Woodruff sits down with Environmental Protection Agency administrator Gina McCarthy to talk about how the agency plans to move forward with President Obama’s climate action plan. In the video above, she responds to the criticism of the agency and the president’s conflicts with Congress.
    Original Air Date: October 24, 2013
  • Obama makes push for 'common sense' immigration reform
    From the White House, President Barack Obama delivered a mid-morning speech Thursday calling on Congress to pass "common sense immigration reform."
    Original Air Date: October 24, 2013

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

  • 'President's Devotional', scriptures that inspired Obama
    As the former head of the Office of Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships under President Barack Obama, Joshua Dubois would seek and offer scripture to serve as inspiration in daily life and in the face of national tragedy. Gwen Ifill sits down with Dubois to discuss his collection, titled "The President's Devotional."
    Original Air Date: October 23, 2013
  • Shellfish made poisonous by toxic algae
    The Pacific Northwest is known for its seafood, but when algae blooms in coastal waters, it can release toxins that poison shellfish and the people who eat them. Katie Campbell of KCTS in Seattle reports on the growing prevalence and toxicity of that algae, and how scientists are studying a possible link to climate change.
    Original Air Date: October 23, 2013
  • Young Detroiters unlock their inner poets
    Detroit schools are turning their students into published poets with a little guidance from professional writers and a program called InsideOut. Jeffrey Brown reflects with U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey about visiting the Motor City middle-schoolers and the "sense of power" she witnessed as they found their voices.
    Original Air Date: October 23, 2013
  • Detroit bankruptcy eligibility case goes to trial
    The city of Detroit filed for bankruptcy in July, and now it must prove to a judge that the conditions necessitate that protection. But some pension funds, unions and retirees are fighting the filing. Jeffrey Brown gets an update from Matthew Dolan of The Wall Street Journal on Detroit's finances.
    Original Air Date: October 23, 2013
  • How will higher education evolve to be more affordable?
    A new report shows the cost of college is rising at a slower rate, but that does little good in easing the struggle for affordable higher education, with fewer funds available for student aid and household incomes at a plateau. What options do students face? Ray Suarez talks to Jeff Selingo of The Chronicle of Higher Education.
    Original Air Date: October 23, 2013
  • Will there be more complications to the health care website?
    The Obama administration has said it is making efforts to improve the health care website, but tech experts warn the problems are far from fixed. For more on what contributed to the flawed launch and the challenges ahead, Hari Sreenivasan speaks with John Engates of RackSpace and Bill Curtis of CAST Software.
    Original Air Date: October 23, 2013
  • White House launches 'tech surge' to boost capacity
    On their first day back in session since the shutdown, House members called out the faults of the health care online exchanges and called for needed fixes. Congressional correspondent Kwame Holman reports on efforts being made by the Obama administration to continue enrollment despite the site's technical troubles.
    Original Air Date: October 23, 2013
  • Elizabeth Becker's 'Overbooked' explores travel and tourism
    Elizabeth Becker talks about the wonders and woes of the ever-growing travel industry and how tourism transforms countries in her new book, 'Overbooked: The Exploding Business of Travel and Tourism."
    Original Air Date: October 23, 2013

VIDEO SEARCH