Wednesday, March 20, 2013

  • Looking for Evidence of Chemical Weapon Attacks in Syria
    In Syria, sketchy reports of two deadly chemical weapon attacks were blamed on rebels by the state media, but those claims seem to be highly suspect. Jeffrey Brown gets analysis from Leonard Spector of the Monterey Institute's Center for Nonproliferation and David Ignatius, a foreign affairs columnist for the Washington Post.
    Original Air Date: March 20, 2013
  • Obama Pledges 'Unwavering' Commitment to Israel's Security
    President Barack Obama made his first trip to Israel, where he reaffirmed the bond between the two nations. Margaret Warner, who is traveling with the president, talks with Gwen Ifill about the timing of the trip and common concerns for the U.S. and Israel, including the Syrian conflict and Iran's nuclear program.
    Original Air Date: March 20, 2013
  • Kwame Holman with Joyce Lee Malcolm on assault weapons ban
    Kwame Holman talks with second amendment scholar Joyce Lee Malcolm about likelihood of Congress voting on bill that would ban assault weapons.
    Original Air Date: March 20, 2013
  • How Together as One Works
    Deepa Gangwani explains how her group Together as One field-tested a cook stove in India.
    Original Air Date: March 20, 2013
    March 20, 2013
  • Recreating Shackleton's Antarctic Journey
    British adventurer Jo Davies is planning to transverse Antarctica following the same route as Sir Ernest Shackleton in honor of the 100th anniversary of his 1914 expedition. NewsHour's Hari Sreenivasan interviews her about how she is preparing for the subzero temperatures and icy terrain.
    Original Air Date: March 20, 2013
  • Chewing Gum: A Student's Friend or Foe?
    Students of Fraser High School in Michigan investigate the pros and cons of chewing gum.
    Original Air Date: March 20, 2013
  • "One Nation Under God?" Students Explore Pledge Options
    Students of Granby High School in Virginia explore how faculty members and their peers feel about the Pledge of Allegiance's "Under God" phrase.
    Original Air Date: March 20, 2013
  • Debate Over School Choice Divides Texans
    Students from Austin High School in Texas explore the facts behind school choice and how it affects their community.
    Original Air Date: March 20, 2013

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

  • Lessons Learned From U.S. Invasion of Iraq, 10 Years Later
    At the 10th anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Iraq, Judy Woodruff taks to New York Times reporter Michael Gordon and Washington Post editor Rajiv Chandrasekaran about the United States military's perspective on the conflict, the legacy left behind in Iraq and the long-lasting effects on U.S. foreign policy.
    Original Air Date: March 19, 2013
  • What's Behind the Shift in Public Opinion Over Gay Marriage?
    A new survey shows a majority of Americans support gay marriage. Support has also grown in the courts and among politicians, including former State Secretary Hillary Clinton and Sen. Rob Portman. Gwen Ifill examines the shift with Michael Dimock of the Pew Research Center and Greg Lewis of Georgia State University.
    Original Air Date: March 19, 2013
  • Examining the Split Among Palestinian Factions
    On his second trip to the Middle East, President Obama will visit Jerusalem, Jordan, and war-torn Ramallah on the West Bank. In a series coinciding with the president's trip, Margaret Warner reports on the growing divide between the two top Palestinian factions, Hamas and Fatah, and each sides' quest for peace.
    Original Air Date: March 19, 2013
  • Church Looks to Pope Francis to Offer Reform to Vatican
    As Pope Francis officially assumes his title, he will face some established challenges and scandals. But the pontiff has already signaled a shift and charmed followers by preaching for greater humility. Jeffrey Brown talks with John Allen from the National Catholic Reporter and CNN about what messages the pope may hope to send.
    Original Air Date: March 19, 2013
  • Car Bombs in Baghdad Mark 10th Anniversary of U.S. Invasion
    On the 10th anniversary of the U.S. Invasion into Iraq, Baghdad suffered a day of bombs and bloodshed. Judy Woodruff offers an update on the new violence, as well as a recap of the decade-long conflict. Jane Arraf of Al Jazeera joins Judy from Baghdad for more on day-to-day life and how Iraqis regard the war today.
    Original Air Date: March 19, 2013
  • An Emergency Room View of Inner-City Health
    In "Living and Dying in Brick City," Dr. Sampson Davis describes why growing up in America's poorest communities can not only increase a young person's chances for social missteps, but can also fuel poor health and drastically shorten their lives. Davis discusses the problems and potential solutions with Ray Suarez.
    Original Air Date: March 19, 2013
  • How Will Pope Francis Address Role of Women in Church?
    This afternoon, Jeffrey Brown spoke with John Allen of the National Catholic Reporter and CNN about the tone and approach the Pope has taken in the first few days since his selection. Here’s a look at one challenge ahead that Allen spoke about: How will the Pope deal with the growing concerns that Vatican leaders are seen by some as not being responsive enough to the role of women in the Church?
    Original Air Date: March 19, 2013
  • Watch the Complete Inaugural Mass of Pope Francis
    Pope Francis was installed Tuesday in an inaugural Mass attended by 132 government delegations, representatives of all the major faiths of the world and thousands of other well-wishers and onlookers.
    Original Air Date: March 19, 2013

Monday, March 18, 2013

  • GOP Take Stock of Losses, Map Strategy to Retake White House
    Reince Priebus, chair of the Republican National Committee, unveiled an unsparing, 98-page report on the party's 2012 presidential election loss. Gwen Ifill gets analysis from USA Today's Susan Page and Stuart Rothenberg of the Rothenberg Political Report on the GOP's soul-searching and future-looking tactics.
    Original Air Date: March 18, 2013
  • Colleges See Older Workforce Holding On to Coveted Positions
    In academia, many professors remain working and teaching long past traditional retirement age, leaving younger potential professors shut out from highly coveted full-time, tenured positions. As part of a series on older workers, economics correspondent Paul Solman reports on how institutions are negotiating with aging faculty.
    Original Air Date: March 18, 2013
  • Israel's New Government Looks to Domestic Agenda
    As neighbors in the region grapple with uncertainty and conflict, Israel's new governing coalition seems to be refocusing on domestic concerns. Jeffrey Brown talks with former U.S. Ambassador to Israel Martin Indyk and David Makovsky of the Washington Institute for an assessment of Israel's new political lineup and priorities.
    Original Air Date: March 18, 2013
  • Will the Banking Crisis in Cyrpus Rock Other Markets?
    Cyprus, off the coast of Greece, is facing its own economic problems. A banking crisis has forced Cyrpus towards a bailout. Other countries fearing aftershock effects on their markets For more on the situation, Judy Woodruff is joined by Jacbob Kirkegaard of the Peter G. Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    Original Air Date: March 18, 2013
  • High Court Hears Arguments on State, Federal Voter ID Law
    The Supreme Court heard arguments on a voter registration law in Arizona that requires voters to provide physical proof of citizenship in order to decrease voter fraud. The case pits the state law against federal law, and opponents say it unfairly targets minorities. Gwen Ifill talks to Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal.
    Original Air Date: March 18, 2013
  • Grassroots Groups Court Young Conservatives at CPAC
    While most cameras are fixed on the speakers and big-names at this year's Conservative Political Action Conference, NewsHour takes a look at the volunteers, activists and conference attendees, the people who are having the relevant conversations about the future of the conservative party.
    Original Air Date: March 18, 2013

Friday, March 15, 2013

  • Shields and Brooks on Cruz vs. Feinstein and March Madness
    In this edition of the Doubleheader, where we discuss the politics of sports and the sport of politics with syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks, we talk about the political dust up between Senators Cruz and Feinstein regarding assault weapons. We also begin discussing what we likely will for the next few weeks; March Madness.
    Original Air Date: March 15, 2013
  • Former JP Morgan Executive Deflects Blame for Mistake
    Ina Drew, the former J.P. Morgan Chase executive who resigned after that bank made a billion dollar trading error, faced a Senate hearing Friday, where she testified she had been a diligent manager but had been lied to by subordinates. Ray Suarez talks with Bloomberg News' Dawn Kopecki who attended the hearing.
    Original Air Date: March 15, 2013
  • Decision Delayed on Dangerous Chemical in Drinking Water
    Science correspondent Miles O'Brien talks to scientists, members of the chemical industry and representatives from Pacific Gas and Electric about chromium-6 contamination in American drinking water. What is a safe level for humans to consume and why has the EPA stalled on setting a federal standard?
    Original Air Date: March 15, 2013
  • Shields and Brooks on CPAC, Obama's Outreach to Congress
    New York Times columnist David Brooks and syndicated columnist Mark Shields talk with Judy Woodruff about who was and wasn't at the annual CPAC meeting, whether President Obama's bipartisan outreach to Congress will produce results, plus words on what the new pope's leadership may mean for the Catholic Church.
    Original Air Date: March 15, 2013
  • Conservative Activists Outline Political Future at CPAC
    The annual CPAC gathering brought together conservatives, activists and possible 2016 candidates tapped with the responsibility to reshape and re-energize the Republican party. Kwame Holman gets reactions from attendees and looks at why some prominent GOP leaders, like New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, won't be at the podium.
    Original Air Date: March 15, 2013
  • Father Helps Promote Empathy by Sharing Emotions in Class
    Andy Haner accompanies his wife Layla and eight-month-old daughter Emory to a third grade class once each month as part of Roots of Empathy. The non-profit program teaches children about emotions and feelings through by following the growth and development of infants. While mostly mothers bring their babies to the schools, Andy is one of the few fathers to do so and explains why.
    Original Air Date: March 15, 2013

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