Wednesday, April 20, 2011

  • Food, Medicine Shortages Among Woes in Libya
    Libyan government forces continue to besiege rebels in Misrata. Judy Woodruff talks with a U.N. official about the humanitarian situation.
    Original Air Date: April 20, 2011
  • LaHood: 2 Controllers Fired, but All Must Take 'Personal Responsibility'
    Federal officials moved to dispel new air-travel safety concerns after a military plane carrying first lady Michelle Obama breached the safety zone of another plane landing ahead of it. Gwen Ifill talks to Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood about the latest in a series of incidents involving air-traffic controllers.
    Original Air Date: April 20, 2011
  • Compensation Disputes Among Lingering Impacts of Gulf Spill
    Wednesday was a day of remembrance on the Gulf Coast, one year after the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history. Jim Lehrer and Tom Bearden report on the clean-up progress and compensation efforts.
    Original Air Date: April 20, 2011
  • Autism Now: Demand for Educational Resources for Children Outstrips Supply
    For public school systems, the demand for special educational and treatment resources for children with autism often outpaces what is available. In the fourth report in his Autism Now series, RobertMacNeil looks at how two schools in the New York City area handle teaching children and teens with autism.
    Original Air Date: April 20, 2011
  • Egypt's Uprising: Tracking How Social Media Stirred Action
    News Group International, a Dubai based-news and information company, analyzed social media from and revolving around the Egypt uprising in Tahrir Square in January and Feb 2011. They discovered a new conversation rising, growing larger all the time and asking Arab people all over the Middle East and North Africa, "who are we and what will we be in the future?"
    Original Air Date: April 20, 2011
  • 'Louisiana Water Stories' documents the culture and curses of SOLA
    Jon Bowermaster's latest documentary, "SOLA: Louisiana Water Stories" (http://www.jonbowermaster.com/dispatches/sola/), looks at the relationship between man and water, from the rich culture of Cajun Country to the environmental disasters that have tested the region.
    Original Air Date: April 20, 2011
  • Autism Now: Demand for Educational Resources for Children Outstrips Supply
    For public school systems, the demand for special educational and treatment resources for children with autism often outpaces what is available. In the fourth report in his Autism Now series, RobertMacNeil looks at how two schools in the New York City area handle teaching children and teens with autism.
    Original Air Date: April 20, 2011
  • Morgan Spurlock's Biggest Sales Pitch
    Hari Sreenivasan interviews Morgan Spurlock, director of the new documentary "POM Wonderful Presents The Greatest Movie Ever Sold". It's a look at the pervasive nature of advertising and product placement entirely funded by product placement.
    Original Air Date: April 20, 2011
  • Worship Band Hillsong UNITED Finds a Following
    Since 1999, Christian worship band Hillsong UNITED has released 11 albums, toured 42 countries and sold more than 11 million records. Art Beat sits down with the Australian group at a recent sold-out concert in New York.
    Original Air Date: April 20, 2011

Tuesday, April 19, 2011

  • One Year On, Photographer Captures the Lingering Impact of the Gulf Oil Spill
    The NewsHour has been checking in periodically with AP photographer Gerald Herbert, a New Orleans native who has been covering the Gulf oil spill ever since BP's Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded and sank exactly one year ago, killing eleven crew members. Over the course of the last twelve months, Herbert has been covering the results of that explosion ever since.
    Original Air Date: April 19, 2011
  • 'Fragile' Progress in Afghanistan Amid Promise of U.S. Drawdown
    As the U.S. prepares to reduce troop levels in Afghanistan, coalition forces are battling increased attacks by the Taliban. Ray Suarez talks with Rajiv Chandrasekaran of the Washington Post about the rising violence in Afghanistan.
    Original Air Date: April 19, 2011
  • 2 Reporters Win Pulitzer for Exposing 'Corruption on Steroids' in California
    Los Angeles Times Reporters Ruben Vives and Jeff Gottlieb were awarded the Pulitzer Prize on Monday for uncovering a massive corruption scandal in Bell, Calif., that resulted in the arrest of eight former or current city officials and accusations that the eight mishandled more than $5.5 million in public funds. Margaret Warner discusses the story with the two lead reporters.
    Original Air Date: April 19, 2011
  • Should Courts or EPA Regulate Greenhouse Gases?
    Gwen Ifill and The National Law Journal's Marcia Coyle discuss the Supreme Court arguments in a case testing who has the authority to regulate greenhouse gases.
    Original Air Date: April 19, 2011
  • Declining Polls, Negative Treasury Rating Cast Shadow Over Obama Budget Message
    President Obama traveled to northern Virginia Tuesday for the first of a weeklong series of town-hall meetings aimed at building support for his budget plan. The stop comes as two new polls revealed declining support for his presidency and a growing public anxiety about deficits and the economy. Judy Woodruff reports.
    Original Air Date: April 19, 2011
  • Joel Achenbach Explores Gulf Oil Spill in 'A Hole at the Bottom of the Sea;
    Hari Sreenivasan talks to Washington Post reporter and author Joel Achenbach about his new book on the Gulf oil spill disaster, "A Hole at the Bottom of the Sea."
    Original Air Date: April 19, 2011
  • Autism's Causes: How Close Are We to Solving the Puzzle?
    The rise in the number of reported autism cases has caused a surge in research to find the causes. Robert MacNeil speaks with four leading researchers: Dr. Gerald Fischbach of the Simons Foundation, Dr. David Amaral of the MIND Institute, Dr. Martha Herbert of Harvard University and Dr. Craig Newschaffer of Drexel University. It's part three of the Autism Now series of reports.
    Original Air Date: April 19, 2011
  • Students Participate in Science Exploration Day
    Students from several Virginia high schools recently attended a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) exploration day sponsored by George Washington University where they built robots, explored nursing and learned about car crash data.
    Original Air Date: April 19, 2011
  • 'Where Children Sleep': An Intimate Portrayal of How Children Live
    When embarking on his project "Where Children Sleep", photographer James Mollison thought about how the sleeping spaces of children around the world reveal much about their lives, and how the notion that we're all born equal is sadly not the case.
    Original Air Date: April 19, 2011
  • Louisianans Still Struggling One Year After the Gulf Oil Spill
    It has been a year since the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded causing the biggest environmental catastrophe in American history. Those who live and work on the Gulf coast are still feeling the impact from the oil spill. Hari Sreenivasan talks to two reporters from Louisiana Public Broadcasting about how the gulf is faring a year later.
    Original Air Date: April 19, 2011

Monday, April 18, 2011

  • Jennifer Egan, Kay Ryan Among Pulitzer Prize Winners
    The 2011 Pulitzer Prize winners were announced Monday. Among the winners in the letters, drama and music categories were novelist Jennifer Egan and poet Kay Ryan, who each recently sat down with Jeffrey Brown to talk about their work.
    Original Air Date: April 18, 2011
  • Deadly Tornadoes Roar Through South, Midwest, Leaving Trail of Devastation
    Gwen Ifill talks with the Red Cross's David Schrader about the devastating storms that tore through six states and killed at least 44 people.
    Original Air Date: April 18, 2011
  • Libya Stalemate Leaves Many Civilians in Need of Aid
    As clashes continue in Libya, concerns are rising for those caught in the crossfire. Margaret Warner talks to the Wall Street Journal's Charles Levinson, who is in Misrata.
    Original Air Date: April 18, 2011
  • Jitters in Markets After Ratings Agency Downgrades U.S. Debt
    There were new financial worries and a jittery stock market Monday after a key ratings agency downgraded its long-term outlook on the nation's debt. Judy Woodruff talks to two analysts for a closer look at the financial and political impact of the move.
    Original Air Date: April 18, 2011
  • Autism Now: Meet Nick, Robert MacNeil's Grandson
    In the first of six reports in his Autism series, former NewsHour anchor Robert MacNeil takes viewers on a visit with his 6-year-old grandson, Nick, to see how autism affects the whole family. Nick experiences autism not just as a brain-development disorder, but also as physical ailments affecting his whole body.
    Original Air Date: April 18, 2011
  • Autism Now: Exploring the 'Phenomenal' Increase in U.S. Prevalence
    In the second report in his Autism Now series, Robert MacNeil investigates why the number of children with autism is increasing in the U.S. MacNeil meets children at different points on the autismspectrum and gets several views on the increase in prevalence -- from better diagnosis to a variety of environmental factors.
    Original Air Date: April 18, 2011
  • Weekly Poem: 'Love Poem' by Dora Malech
    Dora Malech earned a BA in Fine Arts from Yale College in 2003 and an MFA in Poetry from the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop in 2005. Her first full-length collection of poems, "Shore Ordered Ocean," was published in 2009, and the Cleveland State University Poetry Center published her second collection, "Say So," in 2011.
    Original Air Date: April 18, 2011
  • NewsHour Health: Covering Reform Policy, Explaining New Research
    The new PBS NewsHour health page is a one-stop shop to find all of our health news coverage, including reform policy, the latest on new research, innovative graphics and teacher resources. Visit us at pbs.org/newshour/health.
    Original Air Date: April 18, 2011

Friday, April 15, 2011

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