Friday, April 20, 2012

  • Documentary Series "Leaps" Into Sustainability
    This Earth Day, geoscientist Richard Alley will go to great lengths to show that the Earth's climate is shifting- by bungee jumping. In the PBS mini-series "Earth: The Operators' Manual" host Alley visits communities around the world that are finding new ways to harness their renewable energy resources and reduce their carbon footprint.
    Original Air Date: April 20, 2012
  • Political Planking: Everything You Wanted to Know About Shad
    In a quick political debrief, Christina Bellantoni talked with NewsHour congressional correspondent Kwame Holman about his trip to rural Virginia to cover the annual shad planking, an event of politics and grilled fish.
    Original Air Date: April 20, 2012

Thursday, April 19, 2012

  • Remembering Rock Legend Levon Helm of The Band
    Levon Helm was the drummer and a singer for The Band, a rock group known for its blend of blues and folk in songs like "The Night They Drove Ole Dixie Down" and for its work with Bob Dylan. Helm died Thursday at age 71. Here is an excerpt from one of his group's signature songs, "The Weight."
    Original Air Date: April 19, 2012
  • Newly Cast Terra Cotta Warriors Look to More Peaceful Future
    Artist Gong Yuebin grew up during China's Cultural Revolution and it shows. His piece "Site 2801," on display at Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento, Calif., reflects a re-imagined terra cotta army -- 200 warriors interspersed with 10 modern-looking soldiers, symbolizing an unchanged feeling of militarism. Spencer Michels reports.
    Original Air Date: April 19, 2012
  • Edward Luce: It's 'Time to Start Thinking' America
    "Unless America can address government's role in a more pragmatic light," British author Edward Luce writes, "it may doom itself to continued descent. Margaret Warner and Luce discuss his latest book "Time to Start Thinking: America in the Age of Descent," a sobering look at the U.S.'s role in the competitiveness debate.
    Original Air Date: April 19, 2012
  • How Romney, Obama Camps Use Google Ads to Target Voters
    As part of our ongoing series on how the presidential campaign plays out in social media and on the Web, Jeffrey Brown and journalists Lauren Ashburn and Howard Kurtz of daily-download.com discuss how Google Adwords have changed the way President Obama and Mitt Romney target different demographics based on searches.
    Original Air Date: April 19, 2012
  • Vatican: Are U.S. Nuns Promoting 'Radical Feminist Themes?'
    A new Vatican report criticizes the largest group of U.S. Catholic nuns -- the Leadership Conference of Women Religious -- for promoting "radical feminist themes incompatible with the Catholic faith." Judy Woodruff discusses the charge with Christendom College's Donna Bethell and Fordham University's Jeannine Hill Fletcher.
    Original Air Date: April 19, 2012
  • Congress Agrees on 1 Thing: GSA Scandal an Outrage
    A General Services Administration Inspector General report spurred an uproar in Congress when it detailed spending on an $823,000 conference in Las Vegas that included a mind reader, a clown and a $31,000 reception. Kwame Holman updates the GSA spending scandal amid an ongoing investigation and multiple congressional hearings.
    Original Air Date: April 19, 2012
  • VA Adds 1,600 Workers to Fix Backlog
    Responding to a backlog of mental health cases and a blistering federal appeals court ruling, Veteran Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki said Thursday that the agency will hire 1,600 more professionals -- including psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers. Jeffrey Brown and the VA's Sonja Batten discuss the new hires' goals.
    Original Air Date: April 19, 2012
  • Ban Pushes to Send 300 Military Observers to Syria
    Government guns blasted away in the Syrian city of Homs Thursday, oblivious to a U.N. cease-fire. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon proposed sending as many as 300 military observers to Syria while Secretary of State Hillary Clinton called for a new U.N. resolution including an arms embargo. Judy Woodruff reports.
    Original Air Date: April 19, 2012

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

  • Ann Patchett: Pulitzers Skipping Fiction Prize a 'Big Loss'
    For the first time since 1977, no Pulitzer Prize for fiction was awarded this year when none of the three finalists won a majority of a jury's vote. Best-selling authors Ann Patchett and Lev Grossman speak with Jeffrey Brown about the integrity of the judging process and the Pulitzers' power as a sales tool for booksellers.
    Original Air Date: April 18, 2012
  • After Heart Attack, Turning Scar Tissue Into Heart Cells
    A study published Wednesday in the journal Nature revealed that scientists have managed to convert damaged tissue into functioning heart muscle by inducing mild heart attacks on lab mice then coaxing their hearts into rebuilding themselves. In collaboration with KQED's QUEST program, correspondent Spencer Michels reports.
    Original Air Date: April 18, 2012
  • Citigroup Shareholders Assert Say Over CEO's Pay
    Shareholders publicly rebuffed Citigroup Tuesday at an annual meeting, rejecting a $15 million CEO pay package. Margaret Warner discusses the implications amid a national debate over income equality with Anne Simpson of the California Public Employees' Retirement System and Russell Miller of Clearbridge Compensation Group.
    Original Air Date: April 18, 2012
  • How Obama, Romney Camps Are Courting Latino Voters
    President Obama and Mitt Romney are battling for support from voters in the nation's fastest-growing demographic: Latinos, who account for more than 16 percent of the population. Gwen Ifill discusses campaign efforts with Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., and Bettina Inclan, director of Hispanic outreach for the RNC.
    Original Air Date: April 18, 2012
  • Troop Photos With Dead Afghans: How It Affects U.S. Mission
    U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta condemned photos published Wednesday of soldiers posing with dead Afghan insurgents. Jeffrey Brown discusses how the latest in a series of U.S. humiliations might shape military efforts and U.S.-Afghan relations with The Washington Post's Craig Whitlock and Retired Army Col. Bob Killebrew.
    Original Air Date: April 18, 2012

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

  • AP's Reporting Pulitzer for NYPD Profiling Series
    First brought to light in an Associated Press series of reports, a post-9/11 surveillance program by the New York City Police Department on Muslim communities has raised calls for a federal probe. Jeffrey Brown and the AP's Adam Goldman discuss the series that was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting on Monday.
    Original Air Date: April 17, 2012
  • Space Shuttle Discovery Draws Eyes to Sky for Final Flight
    NASA's space shuttle Discovery captivated people in and around the nation's capital Tuesday as it flew piggy-back on a 747 over the Capitol en route on its last landing at Dulles International Airport. Gwen Ifill and Valerie Neal, a curator at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, discuss its future as a museum piece.
    Original Air Date: April 17, 2012
  • What's Ahead for Admitted Mass Killer Breivik?
    On trial for allegedly killing 77 people in last year's massacre in Norway, Anders Behring Breivik concluded a day of chilling testimony by telling the court "I would have done it again." Margaret Warner discusses the unique trial with Anders Tvegard, the U.S. correspondent for the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation.
    Original Air Date: April 17, 2012
  • U.S. Tax Reform: What Could, Should Be Done?
    With renewed talk of tax cuts and President Obama's "Buffett Rule," political maneuvering in Congress and on the campaign trail has turned toward the U.S. tax system. On this tax day, Jeffrey Brown discusses tax reform options with the Brookings Institution's Alice Rivlin and the Tax Policy Center's Donald Marron.
    Original Air Date: April 17, 2012
  • Tax Day Arrives Amid Debate Over Fairness
    Tax filing day this year brought protests and rallies across the country, both for tax cuts and tax fairness. While the issues intertwine, tax cuts and President Obama's "Buffett rule" push have become key points of contention in Congress and on the campaign trail. Gwen Ifill reports.
    Original Air Date: April 17, 2012
  • Miles O'Brien Reflects on Shuttle Program Shortcomings
    Space Shuttle Discovery hitched a ride Tuesday morning from Florida's Kennedy Space Center to Washington D.C.'s Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, where it will live out its final days. NewsHour Science correspondent Miles O'Brien reports on the event from Cape Canaveral. He reflects on what Discovery's final journey means for Florida and where the shuttle program fell short.
    Original Air Date: April 17, 2012
  • What Keeps Kids in School?
    Fort Mill High School teens investigate how their school is able to keep its students coming back.
    Original Air Date: April 17, 2012
  • Political Checklist: Indiana and the Veepstakes
    In this week's Political Checklist, political editor Christina Bellantoni chatted with senior correspondent Gwen Ifill about a red state that's slipped out of President Obama's grasp. We also chatted about those persistent veepstakes, and how we can't help but cover them even though it's a speculative game.
    Original Air Date: April 17, 2012

Monday, April 16, 2012

  • Pulitzer Prize Profile: The Inquirer's Public Service Award
    Announced Monday by Columbia University, The Philadelphia Inquirer won the Pulitzer Prize for public service for its "Assault on Learning" series that chronicled pervasive under-reported violence in the city's public schools. Jeffrey Brown and The Inquirer's Kristen Graham discuss the award and the series' impact on the city.
    Original Air Date: April 16, 2012
  • Secret Service Investigation: What's Under Investigation?
    The Secret Service sent 11 agents home after allegations of misconduct arose involving prostitutes at their hotel in Colombia ahead of President Obama's trip to the Summit of the Americas. Margaret Warner discusses the allegations with former Secret Service chief Ralph Basham and The Wall Street Journal's Laura Meckler.
    Original Air Date: April 16, 2012
  • Preventing a 'Cyber-Pearl Harbor'
    Government-funded DETERlab was built to bring established scientific principles to the field of cybersecurity in hopes of preventing successful cyber attacks on targets such as power grids, banks and train systems. Special correspondent Tom Bearden reports on the project's hopes amid a nation "wholly vulnerable" to such threats.
    Original Air Date: April 16, 2012
  • How Will FCC's Google Street View Fine Shape Data Rules?
    When Google launched its ambitious Street View project in 2007, its vehicles wound up capturing more than images. They also collected personal information from some Wi-Fi networks. Ray Suarez, George Washington University's Jeffrey Rosen and Punch Media's David Bennahum discuss the FCC's case, Google's response and data privacy.
    Original Air Date: April 16, 2012
  • Kabul 'Still on Edge' After 18-Hour Assault by Militants
    U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta said no tactical gains were made by militants' attacks in Kabul, which he said were "done for symbolic purposes." Jeffrey Brown and The Associated Press' Patrick Quinn discuss the situation in Kabul, security in other areas of Afghanistan plus how the militants pulled off the attacks.
    Original Air Date: April 16, 2012

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