Thursday, December 26, 2013

  • George Packer talks economic forces in political discourse
    Jeffrey Brown talks with New Yorker staff writer George Packer, author of "The Unwinding," in an online extra where Packer discusses the way inequality, economic forces and what's happening to some American institutions are rising front and center again in the political discourse -- as well as how he went about picking people to profile for his book.
    Original Air Date: December 26, 2013

Wednesday, December 25, 2013

  • Writer Jay Parini considers 'human face of God'
    A writer rather than a religious scholar, Jay Parini has written a new book, "Jesus: The Human Face of God," that explores how Jesus not only created a world religion but changed history. Jeffrey Brown talks to Parini about his different take on the story of Jesus.
    Original Air Date: December 25, 2013
  • What lies ahead for the Indian economy?
    India has one of the world's largest economies, but growth for the advancing country has slowed to less than 5 percent a year since 2011. With the value of the rupee dropping and inflation surging, how is India's central bank prepared to cope? Hari Sreenivasan interviews Raghuran Rajan, governor of the Reserve Bank of India.
    Original Air Date: December 25, 2013
  • Reviewing 2013's foreign policy challenges
    In 2013, the U.S. opted to negotiate rather than use force in Syria and Iran, but did these efforts lead to a loss of credibility? Anne-Marie Slaughter of the New America Foundation, international consultant John Negroponte, David Ignatius of The Washington Post and Trudy Rubin of The Philadelphia Inquirer join Judy Woodruff.
    Original Air Date: December 25, 2013
  • Parini talks the 'spiritual journey' of writing about Jesus
    Jay Parini, author of the new book "Jesus: The Human Face of God," talks about how he came to write about Jesus' life instead of his usual novels. He sat down with Jeffrey Brown for an online extra diving into "re-mythologizing" Jesus and how the latest discoveries in material have changed how the story needed to be written.
    Original Air Date: December 25, 2013

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

  • Will new Common Core standards centralize student learning?
    One of the most significant and controversial changes in U.S. education this year was the growing adoption of new academic standards known as the Common Core. Jeffrey Brown talks to Claudio Sanchez of NPR, Amanda Ripley, author of "The Smartest Kids in the World," and NewsHour Special Correspondent for Education John Merrow.
    Original Air Date: December 24, 2013
  • Why fewer monarch butterflies are surviving their migrations
    Monarch butterflies migrate to warmer regions each winter, but in recent years Mexico has seen far fewer monarch arrivals. Environmental changes have eliminated the butterflies' sources of food and shelter along the way. Independent video journalist Ross Velton reports on efforts to help monarchs survive their journey south.
    Original Air Date: December 24, 2013
  • Snowden 'vindicated' that NSA revelations raised questions
    Former NSA contractor Edward Snowden made headlines this year when he leaked classified documents about U.S. surveillance practices. In an extensive interview with Barton Gellman of The Washington Post, Snowden said he doesn't regret his actions. Jeffrey Brown talked to Gellman to review other highlights from their conversation.
    Original Air Date: December 24, 2013
  • UN Ambassador Power: 'Relentless' diplomacy in South Sudan
    As South Sudan battles a widespread and volatile rebellion, the U.S. has focused on securing American citizens and helping the U.N. to strengthen security forces in the region. Gwen Ifill talks to U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Samantha Power about the outlook for diplomacy in South Sudan, as well as the Central African Republic.
    Original Air Date: December 24, 2013
  • Dick Davis reads poems three short Persian poems
    Dick Davis, a preeminent scholar of medieval Persian literature, recently published "Faces of Love: Hafez and the Poets of Shiraz," a book of poems he translated from mid-14th century Iran. Here, he read three poems by Jahan Malek Khatun, an Inju Princess. Check out more Art Beat: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/art/
    Original Air Date: December 24, 2013
  • Dick Davis on "Faces of Love" and poetry in Iranian culture
    As a young man, Dick Davis fell in love with Iran and ever since he has dedicated his life to bringing its culture to the west. "Its been a wonderful odyssey." He recently published "Faces of Love: Hafez and the Poets of Shiraz." He spoke to chief arts correspondent Jeffrey Brown's about Hafez and the importance of poetry in Iranian culture.For more Art Beat: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/art
    Original Air Date: December 24, 2013

Monday, December 23, 2013

  • Will 2014 yield immigration reform?
    Despite a push from President Obama for immigration reform, 2013 failed to yield any sweeping legislation. Judy Woodruff talks to Mark Hugo Lopez of the Pew Research Center, Tamar Jacoby of ImmigrationWorks USA, Angela Maria Kelley of the Center for American Progress and Jessica Vaughan of the Center of Immigration Studies.
    Original Air Date: December 23, 2013
  • Your holiday spending may result in an economic loss
    When purchasing holiday gifts for your friends and family, is it really the thought that counts? Some economists argue that spending money on presents that don't produce the same amount of satisfaction from the receiver is a dead weight loss. Paul Solman explores this grinchy economic perspective on the holiday shopping season.
    Original Air Date: December 23, 2013
  • What policies could 'fine tune' U.S. surveillance practices?
    Recommendations by an advisory panel to review U.S. spying practices were released last week. The report, commissioned by President Obama, raised questions about the NSA's phone metadata collection program and surveillance on foreign leaders. Jeffrey Brown talks with two members of the panel: Geoffrey Stone and Peter Swire.
    Original Air Date: December 23, 2013
  • Feds extend health care sign up by one day
    The Obama administration pushed back the ACA enrollment deadline to Dec. 24, giving uninsured Americans one more day to sign up for health care coverage that begins Jan. 1. Officials say the extensions will also help HealthCare.gov deal with the last minute surge. Gwen Ifill talks to Alex Wayne of Bloomberg News.
    Original Air Date: December 23, 2013
  • Dick Davis reads 'I see no love in anyone'
    Dick Davis, a scholar of Persian literature and a poet himself, has translated the works of three poets from 14 century Iran. Here he reads "I see no love in anyone," composed by the renowned Persian poet Hafez.
    Original Air Date: December 23, 2013
  • Dan Ariely's New Evidence that People Don't Care about Taxes
    PBS NewsHour economics correspondent Paul Solman speaks with Duke psychologist and behavioral economist Dan Ariely about how tax rates affect worker performance.
    Original Air Date: December 23, 2013
  • Why Not Give Money Instead of a Gift?
    PBS NewsHour economics correspondent Paul Solman speaks with Duke psychologist and behavioral economist Dan Ariely about his new research on bonuses. Money doesn't necessarily confer the positive incentive to work that one might think, Ariely explains.
    Original Air Date: December 23, 2013

Sunday, December 22, 2013

  • How to choose a charity that really delivers
    Studies show that Americans are the most charitable people in the world, but a change to charitable deductions may reduce the overall amount given to charity by billions. Charity Navigator's CEO Ken Berger explains how to choose a charity which provides the best giving value per dollar.
    Original Air Date: December 22, 2013

Saturday, December 21, 2013

  • Web exclusive: Update on Mexican journalists under threat
    John Larson speaks with Robert Mahoney, Deputy Director of the Committee to Protect Journalists about the repressive situation for journalists in Mexico and new hope for those covering Iran.
    Original Air Date: December 21, 2013
  • Will France ban childhood beauty pageants?
    In January, France's national legislature will vote whether to ban childhood beauty pageants. Critics contend that the pageants send the wrong message to young girls and only add to what they argue is an already over-sexualized environment for children today. William Brangham of NewsHour Weekend reports.
    Original Air Date: December 21, 2013
  • Number of imprisoned journalists is second-highest on record
    Over 200 journalists are being detained for their work around the world, making 2013 the second-worst year on record for journalists in prison, according to the most recent report by the Committee to Protect Journalists. John Larson speaks with Robert Mahoney, Deputy Director of the Committee to Protect Journalists for more on the story.
    Original Air Date: December 21, 2013

Friday, December 20, 2013

  • Journalist Ari Shavit wrestles with complexity of Israel
    In the decades since its founding, the nation of Israel has seen wars, violent uprisings and attempts to negotiate peace. Margaret Warner sits down with Ari Shavit to discuss his new book, "My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel" and his own personal journey understanding and acknowledging its history.
    Original Air Date: December 20, 2013
  • Shields and Brooks on the ACA legacy, gifts for politicians
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week's top news, including their predictions on how the health care law will be viewed in history, what America will remember about the 113th Congress and what holiday gifts they'd bestow to some of America's politicos.
    Original Air Date: December 20, 2013
  • Can memory video games deliver on brain-boosting claims?
    A new breed of video games are designed to exercise aging brains and improve players' attention, speed and memory. But critics say the claims made by developers are not supported with evidence. Could these mental workouts make a difference? Special correspondent Jake Schoneker reports on the science behind cognitive training.
    Original Air Date: December 20, 2013
  • Political clash grows into wider South Sudan unrest
    The eruption of violence inside the world's youngest nation has sparked fears of war. At least 500 people have died and 30,000 displaced in a bout of internal tension in South Sudan. Jeffrey Brown talks to Lesley Anne Warner of CNA Analysis and Solutions, a non-profit research organization, about the conflict's origins.
    Original Air Date: December 20, 2013
  • Obama administration announces special ACA hardship waiver
    The Obama administration announced a new offer for individuals who had insurance policies canceled: the chance to buy cheaper, catastrophic coverage if new plans are more expensive. Judy Woodruff discusses the details of the special waiver and how many are expected to sign up for it with Mary Agnes Carey of Kaiser Health News.
    Original Air Date: December 20, 2013
  • Obama admits ups and downs of 2013, looks forward to 2014
    President Obama concluded his fifth year in office with an annual year-in-review press conference. Although the president saw sinking approval ratings in 2013, he suggested 2014 can be a "breakthrough year for America." Jeffrey Brown reviews the topics Mr. Obama covered, from the economy to the health care law.
    Original Air Date: December 20, 2013

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