Thursday, June 20, 2013

  • Wall Street Feels Pain of China's Credit Crunch
    It was a bad day for global markets, whose stocks fell over worries about a credit crunch in China and comments by Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke that the fed may begin paring back stimulus efforts. Jeffrey Brown gets reactions from The Wall Street Journal's David Wessel and James Paulsen of Wells Capital Management.
    Original Air Date: June 20, 2013
  • News Wrap: U.S. House Fails to Pass Farm Bill
    In other news Thursday, the U.S. House of Representatives failed to pass a five-year, half-trillion dollar farm bill. The bill would have cut food stamps by $2 billion annually. Also, Afghan President Hamid Karzai has changed his mind and says he will participate in peace talks with the U.S. and the Taliban.
    Original Air Date: June 20, 2013
  • Senators Near Key Compromise on Beefed-Up Border Security
    A bipartisan group of senators have worked out a potentially critical compromise for the immigration reform bill. Reform supporters said they had met demands for greatly expanded policing of the border with Mexico. Ray Suarez talks with two lawmakers shaping the legislation: Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D., and Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M.
    Original Air Date: June 20, 2013
  • Money on the Mind
    In a series of startling studies, psychologists at the University of California at Berkeley have found that “upper-class individuals behave more unethically than lower-class individuals.” Ongoing research is trying to find out what it is about wealth — or lack of it — that makes people behave they way they do. Paul Solman reports as part of his Making Sen$e series.
    Original Air Date: June 20, 2013
    June 20, 2013
  • Can Money Buy Happiness?
    Although U.S. GDP has grown over the last 35 years, average happiness has not. According to researchers at the University of California at Berkeley, the reason may lie in growing economic inequality. Paul Solman reports as part of his Making Sen$e series.
    Original Air Date: June 20, 2013
    June 20, 2013

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

  • David Rothenberg Jams with the Cicadas
    David Rothenberg, professor of philosophy and music at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, takes his clarinet out to Ulster County Fairgrounds in New York to play music with the cicadas, which have emerged after 17 years underground. Their sounds are as musical as bird calls and whale songs, he says in his new book "Bug Music."
    Original Air Date: June 19, 2013
  • Frederick Douglass Statue Unveiled at the Capitol
    At the U.S. Capitol's Emancipation Hall, lawmakers honored the legacy and spirit of Frederick Douglass -- freed slave, abolitionist and human rights advocate -- with a new statue in his likeness. Ray Suarez offers excerpts from the ceremony.
    Original Air Date: June 19, 2013
  • A Call for New Commitment to the Humanities
    A new report by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences panel warns that the U.S. could lose its competitive edge in the liberal arts and social sciences. Jeffrey Brown talks with two members of the panel: actor and writer John Lithgow and Richard Brodhead, co-chair of the Commission on the Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Original Air Date: June 19, 2013
  • Sen. Tim Kaine on the Immigration Debate
    The Senate continues to work on a sweeping bill to overhaul the nation's immigration system, moving toward a final vote before the July 4 deadline. In a one-on-one conversation, Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., talks with Ray Suarez about his immigration bill priorities and working with the House on comprehensive reform.
    Original Air Date: June 19, 2013
  • Obama Calls for Dramatic Decrease in Nuclear Arms
    President Barack Obama said the U.S. could reduce its stockpile of long-range nuclear weapons by up to a third, and called upon Russia to make similar cuts. Margaret Warner gets reactions to Mr. Obama's call from former State and Defense Department official Eric Edelman and Joseph Cirincione of the Ploughshares Fund.
    Original Air Date: June 19, 2013
  • News Wrap: Federal Reserve Paints Brighter Picture
    In other news Wednesday, the Federal Reserve estimated unemployment will fall a little faster than expected in 2013 and 2014. Also, the Internal Revenue Service is in the spotlight again, this time for its plans to pay bonuses to employees despite a White House directive to stop those payments under automatic spending cuts.
    Original Air Date: June 19, 2013
  • Will Karzai's Reversal Impact Drive for Stability?
    A day after a breakthrough agreement on holding direct talks, Afghan President Hamid Karzai backed away from announced negotiations with the U.S. and the Taliban. Jeffrey Brown talks with The New York Times' Rob Nordland, from Doha, Qatar, for more detail on the decision and possible next moves.
    Original Air Date: June 19, 2013
  • Afghan Government Backs Away From Talks
    A day after an announcement that the Afghan government would open negotiations with the Taliban, President Hamid Karzai reversed that decision, raising objections including the Taliban's use of its formal name at its new office in Qatar. Karzai also suspended talks with the U.S. over security conditions. Jeffrey Brown reports.
    Original Air Date: June 19, 2013
  • John Lithgow on the Importance of a Humanities Education
    A call was put out by the American Academy of the Arts and Sciences for a commitment to the study of the humanities. Actor John Lithgow and President of Duke University Richard Brodhead join NewsHour correspondent Jeffrey Brown to talk about how a humanities education supports a lifelong mission of learning.
    Original Air Date: June 19, 2013
  • Cicada Mania: A 17-Year Benchmark in Time
    Cicadas have overwhelmed large swaths of the Eastern United States this summer, and their behavior and deafening song provide research material for scientists, inspiration for artists and well, mixed reactions from residents. Miles O'Brien reports.
    Original Air Date: June 19, 2013
  • Watch Angela Merkel and Barack Obama's Remarks in Berlin
    U.S. President Barack Obama and German Chancellor Angela Merkel addressed crowds gathered in Berlin in front of the Brandenburg Gate, a historic location for past U.S. presidents.
    Original Air Date: June 19, 2013

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

  • Ancient Afghan Poetry Form Adapts to Portray Modern Life
    For centuries, Pashtun women have traded stories, feelings and life wisdom in the form of two-line oral poems called landays. Eliza Griswold, a journalist and poet herself, traveled to Afghanistan to learn more about daily life there through the modern exchange of poetry. Jeffrey Brown takes a closer look at Griswold's project.
    Original Air Date: June 18, 2013
  • Religious Clashes Erupt as Myanmar Transitions to Democracy
    The Southeast Asian country of Myanmar has taken major steps to turn from a military dictatorship to a fledgling democracy. But that transition has also seen the rise of harrowing, deadly clashes between Buddhists and Muslims. Special correspondent Kira Kay reports from Myanmar.
    Original Air Date: June 18, 2013
  • Are Teachers Being Adequately Trained for the Classroom?
    A study of 600 American schools conducted by the National Council on Teacher Quality finds new teachers are being inadequately prepared to instruct students. But the report's findings and methodology have come under critique. Jeffrey Brown looks at the study with John Merrow, NewsHour's special correspondent for education.
    Original Air Date: June 18, 2013
  • Sen. Rand Paul on Path to Citizenship and Border Security
    Protestors interrupted a House hearing on a Republican immigration bill focused entirely on law enforcement. By contrast, the Senate bill combines enforcement and a path to citizenship. Ray Suarez talks to Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., about his stance on legalization of undocumented immigrants being contingent on border security.
    Original Air Date: June 18, 2013
  • Engagement in Talks by Taliban Reflects Desire for Peace
    As Afghan forces took control of their country's security, the Taliban agreed to join the U.S. and Afghanistan for negotiations. Gwen Ifill talks to former Defense Department official David Sedney, retired Col. David Lamm of the National Defense University and Pamela Constable of The Washington Post about this turning point.
    Original Air Date: June 18, 2013
  • Short, Potent Poetry Offers Bite of Afghan Life
    Journalist Eliza Griswold and photographer Seamus Murphy collaborated on a project on oral folk poems known as landays, which have been recited by women in Afghanistan for centuries. Murphy discusses some of his favorite images of daily life in Afghanistan.
    Original Air Date: June 18, 2013
  • Should Virtual Reality Make You Vomit?
    As part of his conversation with Paul Solman, Jaron Lanier recounts his early experience introducing virtual reality to Hollywood and how his own expectations of his technology didn't always align with demand.
    Original Air Date: June 18, 2013
  • Sister Azezet
    Sister Azezet talks about the kidnap and torture of Eritrean and Ethiopian refugees in the Sinai.
    Original Air Date: June 18, 2013
    June 18, 2013

Monday, June 17, 2013

  • Should Government Pay for the Information It Collects?
    What is the real price of the benefits we reap from interacting with free or convenient online networks? How can we make that system more transparent? Economics correspondent Paul Solman talks to Jaron Lanier, whose new book, "Who Owns the Future?", argues that digital networks are destroying jobs and exacerbating inequality.
    Original Air Date: June 17, 2013
  • Some States Have Second Thoughts About Refusing Medicaid
    Republican governors from Florida, Michigan, Ohio and Arizona were originally opposed to the health care law, but are now pushing to expand Medicaid. Hari Sreenivasan talks with Ohio Public Radio bureau chief Karen Kasler and Mary K. Reinhartf, reporter for The Arizona Republic, about what's behind the changes in their states.
    Original Air Date: June 17, 2013
  • How Will Iran's New President Impact Relations with U.S.?
    What does the election of Hasan Rowhani mean for Iran's nuclear program? How will Iran's new president approach relations with the U.S.? To address those questions, Gwen Ifill is joined by Karim Sadjadpour of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and Cliff Kupchin, Middle East director at the Eurasia Group.
    Original Air Date: June 17, 2013
  • How Well Will Electronic Verification System Work?
    Among the more than 100 amendments to the proposed immigration legislation that lawmakers must review are proposals to bolster the electronic employment verification system known as E-Verify. Ray Suarez gets debate on that issue from Mark Krikorian of the Center for Immigration Studies and Chris Calabrese of the ACLU.
    Original Air Date: June 17, 2013

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