Thursday, February 16, 2012

  • Preview: Rep. Pelosi on Payroll Tax Cut Agreement
    In this excerpt of a newsmaker interview, Judy Woodruff talks with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi on the agreement forged in Congress to extend the payroll tax cut.
    Original Air Date: February 16, 2012

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

  • What's Causing a Shortage of Pediatric Cancer Drugs?
    While more than 250 drugs were declared in short supply in the U.S. this past year, the latest worries centered on one called Methotrexate, considered essential for children battling leukemia. Ray Suarez discusses the problem and latest developments with Dr. Peter Adamson of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
    Original Air Date: February 15, 2012
  • Tunisia Attempts Painful Transition to Democracy
    One year after the revolution that sparked the Arab Spring, Tunisia faces ongoing economic and political struggles as it attempts a painful transition to democracy. Jessie Deeter reports, as part of a collaboration with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.
    Original Air Date: February 15, 2012
  • Surveying the Safety, Wisdom of New Nuclear Reactors in Ga.
    A construction site in Georgia is slated to house the nation's first new commercial nuclear reactors in decades. Jeffrey Brown discusses the controversial Plant Vogtle facility and the state of American nuclear power with Stephen Smith of the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy and the Nuclear Energy Institute's Tony Pietrangelo.
    Original Air Date: February 15, 2012
  • In Michigan, Romney 'Is Going to Have to Fight for His Life'
    Several national polls now show GOP hopeful Rick Santorum in a new dead heat with longtime front-runner Mitt Romney. Gwen Ifill discusses Santorum's rise and efforts to win Michigan's Feb. 28 primary with The Washington Post's Dan Balz and Bill Ballenger of the Inside Michigan Politics newsletter.
    Original Air Date: February 15, 2012
  • From Overcrowding to Corruption, Examining Honduran Prisons
    A fast-moving blaze engulfed a Honduras prison Tuesday night, killing more than 272 people. Margaret Warner discusses the details of the fire and a prison system notorious for overcrowding and violence with The Wall Street Journal's Nicholas Casey, reporting from Mexico City.
    Original Air Date: February 15, 2012
  • How Do Italians Feel About the Need for Change?
    Italian author and journalist Beppe Severgnini says Italians have changed more in the past six months than the last 15 years in light of the Eurozone crisis.
    Original Air Date: February 15, 2012
  • How Did Italy Get in This Mess?
    Italian author and journalist Beppe Severgnini said in order for Italians to have a solid European system of health care and social security, it's necessary to pay European taxes and "have a sort of control over funny money."
    Original Air Date: February 15, 2012

Tuesday, February 14, 2012

  • Poet Explores Differences in Species' 'Romantic Moments'
    In honor of Valentine's Day, poet Tony Hoagland reads "Romantic Moment" -- a poem about a man and woman who have just watched a nature documentary on a date, and how their expressions of affection stack up against those of leopard frogs, chimpanzees, bull penguins and so on.
    Original Air Date: February 14, 2012
  • The Jeremy Lin Phenomenon
    Jeremy Lin, a point guard for the New York Knicks and the first Chinese-American player in NBA history, is on a storybook run in his first four games as a starter. Ray Suarez and Jeff Yang of The Wall Street Journal explore how an unknown basketball player suddenly captured the attention of the NBA, the sports world and beyond.
    Original Air Date: February 14, 2012
    February 14, 2012
  • 'Accordion' Families Expand for Boomerang Kids to Move Home
    In her new book, "The Accordion Family," sociologist Katherine Newman examines why more young adults in the world's wealthiest countries are returning home to live with their parents -- a phenomenon that Paul Solman has come across repeatedly in his reporting on global economic problems as part of his Making Sen$e series.
    Original Air Date: February 14, 2012
  • Who Makes Apple's Gadgets and Under What Conditions?
    While Apple's popularity has grown with products like the iPad, iPod and iPhone, so has criticism of the labor practices at Chinese factories where the products are made. Jeffrey Brown discusses the criticism and an ongoing audit of worker conditions with Peter Burrows of Bloomberg Businessweek.
    Original Air Date: February 14, 2012
  • China's Xi Visits Obama
    Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping visited the White House Tuesday, where President Obama cautioned him and his nation that with "expanding power" comes more responsibility. Gwen Ifill discusses the state of U.S.-China relations with the Brookings Institution's Cheng Li and Michael Pillsbury, a Defense Department consultant.
    Original Air Date: February 14, 2012
    February 14, 2012
  • What Extending Payroll Tax Cuts Would Mean for Americans
    After days of partisan deadlock, there were signs of progress Tuesday in Congress over extending payroll tax cuts and jobless benefits for the rest of the year. Judy Woodruff discusses the politics and the implications of the potential extensions with Todd Zwillich of WNYC Radio's "The Takeaway."
    Original Air Date: February 14, 2012
  • Boomerang: The Trend of College Grads Living with Mom and Da
    Rather than finding an apartment with friends or buying a home of one's own, sociologist Katherine Newman tells us she has found that after graduation, more and more 20-somethings are returning to live with their parents.
    Original Air Date: February 14, 2012
  • Brookyln Reporting Lab Discusses School Engagement
    Students at Brooklyn Community Arts and Media high school discuss school engagement.
    Original Air Date: February 14, 2012

Monday, February 13, 2012

  • The Life and Legacy of Whitney Houston
    Whitney Houston, the superstar known for turning gospel and soul into pop music gold, was found dead over the weekend in her Los Angeles hotel room. She was 48. Jeffrey Brown and songwriter Gordon Chambers discuss her life and legacy, including some recent struggles that drew public concern.
    Original Air Date: February 13, 2012
  • Why China's Youth Find Western Culture Attractive
    As Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping travels to the United States this week -- a trip designed in part to head off mounting tensions between the two countries -- GlobalPost correspondent Kathleen McLaughlin reports from Beijing on the growing influence of Western culture on Chinese youth.
    Original Air Date: February 13, 2012
  • Documentary Relays Forgotten Tales of Post-Civil War Slavery
    A new PBS documentary called "Slavery by Another Name" tells the story of the adapted forced labor practices that helped extend slavery long after the end of the Civil War. Gwen Ifill speaks with Douglas Blackmon, the film's co-executive producer, about this largely forgotten piece of history and the forces that propelled it.
    Original Air Date: February 13, 2012
  • After Wins, Some Republicans Still Question Romney's Values
    Despite weekend wins by Mitt Romney in Maine's caucuses and the Conservative Political Action Conference straw poll, the most recent nationwide survey of voters found Rick Santorum slightly ahead. Judy Woodruff discusses the evolving GOP field with USA Today's Susan Page and The Rothenberg Political Report's Stuart Rothenberg.
    Original Air Date: February 13, 2012
  • Greek Ambassador: 'Profound Reforms' Necessary for Recovery
    Protests flooded Athens over the weekend, escalating Monday in the wake of the Greek Parliament's approval of a new wave of austerity measures. Jeffrey Brown talks with Greece's ambassador to the United States, Vassilis Kaskarelis, about the protests, the bailout negotiations and the potential impact of the austerity plan.
    Original Air Date: February 13, 2012
  • Obama, Republicans Square Off Over $3.8 Trillion Budget Plan
    Unveiling a $3.8 trillion budget blueprint on Monday, President Obama cast the plan as an essential tool to spur economic growth and noted that tough choices would put the country "on a more sustainable fiscal path." Republicans called the plan a "campaign document." Ray Suarez reports.
    Original Air Date: February 13, 2012
  • Weekly Poem: Rita Dove Reads 'Chocolate'
    In celebration of Valentines Day, Rita Dove reads her poem, "Chocolate," from her book, "American Smooth."
    Original Air Date: February 13, 2012

Friday, February 10, 2012

  • 'OMG! Meiyu' Introduces China to American Slang
    Combining the powers of social media and fluent Mandarin, Jessica Beinecke teaches American slang to eager Chinese minds half a world away. Hari Sreenivasan reports on Beinecke's success with Voice of America's online video program "OMG! Meiyu" and her role as an ambassador of American culture and language to China.
    Original Air Date: February 10, 2012
  • Shields, Brooks on Obama's Contraception Compromise and CPAC
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks discuss the week's top political news including, President Obama backtracking on the administration's earlier contraception mandate, the GOP field at the Conservative Political Action Conference and Rick Santorum's latest surge in the delegate race.
    Original Air Date: February 10, 2012
  • Italy: 'Going the Greece Way' Would Be Disastrous
    Languishing amid the eurozone crisis, all of Italy is hurting and under pressure from international creditors to bring down its massive national debt. Margaret Warner reports from Milan on an economy so big that a default could bring about the collapse of the entire euro system.
    Original Air Date: February 10, 2012
  • Greece Reels as Government OKs More Austerity Measures
    As Greece signed off on a new round of austerity measures in exchange for another bailout, European finance ministers said the cuts may not be enough. James Mates of Independent Television News reports on the start of a two-day strike over the cuts.
    Original Air Date: February 10, 2012
  • Sebelius Explains White House's Contraception Compromise
    In an abrupt shift in policy Friday, President Obama backtracked some, announcing that religious employers would not be required to offer free birth control to employees after all. Instead the burden would be on insurers. Ray Suarez and Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius discuss the president's new plan.
    Original Air Date: February 10, 2012

VIDEO SEARCH