Monday, March 12, 2012

  • Weekly Poem: 'The House on Laurel Hill Lane'
    Megan Snyder-Camp is the author of "The Forest of Sure Things," which won the Tupelo Press/Crazyhorse Award for an outstanding first book.
    Original Air Date: March 12, 2012
  • Pregnant Teens Struggle to Stay in School
    Students profile pregnant teens at their school who must balance family and education responsibilities.
    Original Air Date: March 12, 2012

Friday, March 9, 2012

  • The Doubleheader: On Hawaii, March Madness and POTUS Sports
    Christina filled in for Hari for the Doubleheader with columnists Mark Shields and David Brooks, and surprise, surprise, they disagree about the New York Mets. Also: predictions of the outcome of the much coveted political assignment covering the Hawaii Republican caucuses on Tuesday and whether President Obama chooses North Carolina teams for his Final Four because it's a swing state.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2012
  • Fukushima Survivor: 'I've Hardly Smiled This Whole Year'
    Carl Pillitteri was one of 38 Americans at the Fukushima plant when the earthquake hit. Describing the "demonic" sounds he heard and the pit of fear he felt inside the turbine building that day, Pillteri recently spoke with Alex Chadwick, the host of the new American Public Media series "BURN: An Energy Journal."
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2012
  • Spitzer: Richest Americans Would Still Work Facing 60% Tax
    Despite myriad tax collections -- from income to Social Security, the U.S. still has a budget deficit of $1.3 trillion. In this Need to Know excerpt, Ray Suarez and a panel of experts including former New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer examine specifically how the country could raise more money while making the tax code fairer.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2012
  • Fukushima Survivor: I Want 'To Breathe Freely Again'
    Nuclear technician Carl Pillitteri was one of 38 Americans at the Fukushima nuclear power plant when an earthquake and tsunami struck Japan's eastern coast and triggered a radiation leak at the reactor. It's taken Pillitteri a full year to be able to talk publicly about what he saw at Fukushima.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2012
  • Shields, Brooks on Jobs Report, Romney Lacking Appeal
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks discuss the week's top political news including the state of play among the Republican president candidates, efforts to woo female voters, Mitt Romney's style of campaigning and President Obama's record on jobs.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2012
  • Near Fukushima, a Big 'Guessing Game' Over Long-Term Risks
    Sunday marks a year since a massive earthquake and tsunami struck Japan, causing a partial meltdown of nuclear reactors at the Fukushima plants. In the first report in a series on Japan's recovery, Miles O'Brien documents the country's cleanup attempts as scientists decide whether residual radiation could be potentially harmful.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2012
  • Jobs Report Shows Momentum, but Unevenness Seen in Recovery
    New jobs numbers released Friday showed more than 142 million Americans at work in February, the most since January 2009, but the unemployment rate stayed put at 8.3 percent. Ray Suarez discusses the latest numbers and general trends in hiring with Brandeis University's Lisa Lynch and Mesirow Financial's Diane Swonk.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2012
  • After Tornado, Henryville Focuses on Recovery and Restoring
    The town of Henryville, Indiana - 20 miles north of Louisville - was especially hard hit after F4 winds estimated at 175-miles-an-hour devastated the area last Friday. Now, 1 week later, the focus is on clean up, recovery and restoring power. Diane Willis of partner station WFYI Indianapolis reports.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2012
  • Poet Eavan Boland Reads 'Quarantine'
    Irish poet Eavan Boland reads "Quarantine."
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2012
  • Conversation: Poet Eavan Boland
    Jeffrey Brown talks to Irish poet Eavan Boland about her work.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2012

Thursday, March 8, 2012

  • Libyan Rebels Struggle for Normalcy After Revolution
    Many Libyan rebels who took to the streets to oust Moammar Gadhafi are now struggling to return to normalcy. GlobalPost correspondent Tracey Shelton reports.
    Original Air Date: March 8, 2012
  • Oregon Farmers Surprised to Find Fish in Fields
    Researchers in Oregon's Willamette Valley found young native fish thriving in ditches that fill with water during the winter months. The unrecognized habitat meant farmers had been inadvertently raising fish in their fields, in addition to their intended crops, for years. This report first appeared on Oregon Public Broadcasting.
    Original Air Date: March 8, 2012
  • 'Kony 2012': Viral Video's Message, Backlash Examined
    The "Stop Kony" campaign that's gone viral in recent days aims to spotlight the atrocities of warlord Joseph Kony in Uganda. Margaret Warner discusses the nonprofit Invisible Children's popular "Kony 2012" video and the ensuing criticism of it with the Institute for Policy Studies' Emira Woods and Porter Novelli's Dawn Arteaga.
    Original Air Date: March 8, 2012
  • How Republicans, Democrats Are Vying to Win Women's Votes
    Amid a flurry of recent news on women's issues, Democrats are working to capitalize on debates over a birth-control mandate and a proposed Virginia ultrasound requirement for abortions. Judy Woodruff discusses parties' attempts to woo women voters with The Washington Post's Ruth Marcus and Republican strategist Cheri Jacobus.
    Original Air Date: March 8, 2012
  • Activist: Amid Torture, Syrians OK With Risks of No-Fly Zone
    Syria's deputy oil minister appeared to defect from President Assad's regime in an online video Thursday, calling the opposition "the voice of righteousness." Ray Suarez, Syrian activist Danny Abdul Dayem and the International Crisis Group's Robert Malley discuss the hurdles of bringing aid to the country's rebels and civilians.
    Original Air Date: March 8, 2012
  • Can Lure of Driver's Licenses Keep Kids in School?
    A growing number of states across the U.S. have begun using the driver's license as an incentive to try to keep students from dropping out. The laws vary from state to state but the general premise is the same: if a student wants to stay on the road, he or she must stay in school. But whether these policies are effective is a matter of debate between parents, students and educational analysts.
    Original Air Date: March 8, 2012

Wednesday, March 7, 2012

  • Sam LaHood: Transition in Egypt Is Uneven
    Sam LaHood, the son of Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood and director of the International Republican Institute, was one of 16 Americans arrested in Egypt and temporarily barred from leaving for observing elections. Ray Suarez spoke with LaHood about the circumstances of his arrest.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2012
  • 'The Worst Place on Earth to Be a Woman'
    The Democratic Republic of Congo is the worst place on earth to be a woman, according to the United Nations. Regional war and rape leave an estimated 1,000 or more women assaulted every day. One organization, HEAL Africa, helps women manage their traumatic injuries holistically. Correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2012
  • Iran: Can Diplomacy Prevail Over Military Action?
    President Obama said Tuesday he still hopes Iran's nuclear threat could be resolved diplomatically. Jeffrey Brown explores potential diplomatic solutions to growing tensions between with U.S., Iran and Israel with the Brookings Institution's Suzanne Maloney and The Washington Institute for Near Easy Policy's Mehdi Khalaji.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2012
  • With Romney Leading and No End in Sight, Campaigns Carry on
    Despite winning six states, Mitt Romney's Super Tuesday victories did little to winnow the GOP field. Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul picked up some delegates and continued campaigning ahead of more caucuses and primaries. Gwen Ifill, USA Today's Susan Page and the Pew Research Center's Andrew Kohut discuss the race.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2012

Tuesday, March 6, 2012

  • Shields, Gerson: 'Race Far From Over' After Super Tuesday
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and Washington Post columnist Michael Gerson discuss Super Tuesday wins and losses by Mitt Romney, Newt Gingrich, Rick Santorum and Ron Paul. Then Political Editor Christina Bellantoni and The Rothenberg Political Report's Stuart Rothenberg discuss polling numbers in Ohio's critical contest.
    Original Air Date: March 6, 2012
  • Watch Mitt Romney's Super Tuesday Speech
    Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney addressed a crowd of supporters Tuesday night in Boston, Mass., on the evening of Super Tuesday primaries and caucuses in 10 states and projected wins for him in Massachusetts, Vermont and Virginia. "Real change is finally on the way," he told the crowd as he took aim at President Obama.
    Original Air Date: March 6, 2012
  • Watch Rick Santorum's Super Tuesday Speech
    Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum addressed a crowd of supporters Tuesday night in Steubenville, Ohio, on the evening of Super Tuesday primaries and caucuses in 10 states and projected wins for him in Tennessee and Oklahoma. "We're going to win a few, we're going to lose a few," he told the crowd.
    Original Air Date: March 6, 2012
  • Watch Newt Gingrich's Super Tuesday Speech
    Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich addressed a crowd of supporters Tuesday night in Atlanta, Georgia, on the evening of Super Tuesday primaries and caucuses in 10 states and a projected win for him in his home state's primary. "We survived every effort of the establishment to stop us," he told the crowd.
    Original Air Date: March 6, 2012
  • Watch Ron Paul's Super Tuesday Speech
    Texas Congressman Ron Paul addressed a crowd of supporters Tuesday night in Fargo, N.D., on the evening of Super Tuesday primaries and caucuses in 10 states. "The cause of liberty is on a roll'," Paul told the crowd.
    Original Air Date: March 6, 2012
  • What Bounty System Scandal Means for NFL's Future
    NFL investigators found the New Orleans Saints defensive coordinator Gregg Williams had created a bounty program to reward players when they injured opposing teams' players. Hari Sreenivasan and Sports Illustrated's Peter King discuss other ongoing investigations and the implications for the future of the NFL.
    Original Air Date: March 6, 2012

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