Friday, August 16, 2013

  • Watch Ben Harper and Charlie Musselwhite Harmonize
    Blues musicians Ben Harper, Charlie Musselwhite performed the acoustic guitar-harmonica duet, "You Found Another Lover (I Lost Another Friend)" for Art Beat at the Gibson showroom in Washington, D.C. The song is off the duo's recent album, "Get Up."
    Original Air Date: August 16, 2013
  • What Can Virtual Reality Do for You?
    Force for good or ill? Economics correspondent Paul Solman explores the latest virtual reality technology with Stanford University's Jeremy Bailenson, and weighs its societal impact with Jaron Lanier, author of "Who Owns the Future?"
    Original Air Date: August 16, 2013

Thursday, August 15, 2013

  • Pediatricians Add Reading to Essential Check-Up List
    National literacy program Reach Out and Read reaches kids in a place where they are almost guaranteed to visit: the doctor's office. Special correspondent John Merrow meets a new breed of pediatrician -- part doctor, part teacher -- who help parents share books with their children to improve and encourage cognitive development.
    Original Air Date: August 15, 2013
  • Mistaken Identity for Elusive Olinguito, World's New Mammal
    Misidentified for decades, this newly classified member of the raccoon family finally made its scientific debut. Jeffrey Brown discusses the surprising discovery with zoologist Kristofer Helgen of the Smithsonian Institution, who tracked the animal down to the cloud forests of Ecuador.
    Original Air Date: August 15, 2013
  • Does the Pentagon's Plan Do Enough to Curb Sexual Assault?
    The Defense Department is offering new initiatives to help combat sexual assault in the military, keeping adjudication within the chain of command. Will the plan help protect victims and prosecute offenders? Jeffrey Brown gets debate from attorney Susan Burke and retired Maj. Gen. John Altenburg, a former Army lawyer.
    Original Air Date: August 15, 2013
  • In the Wake of Turmoil, Should U.S. Suspend Aid to Egypt?
    President Barack Obama condemned the Egyptian government's use of violent force on protesters but stopped short of suspending $1.5 billion in aid the U.S. provides to Egypt each year. Judy Woodruff asks former U.S. ambassador Nicholas Burns and Joe Stork of Human Rights Watch for views on how the U.S. should proceed.
    Original Air Date: August 15, 2013
  • Mirror, Mirror on the Wall
    Paul Piff, a social psychologist at the University of California, Berkeley, describes his research exploring the relationship between wealth, entitlement and narcissism, and we see a reenactment of Piff's "mirror study."
    Original Air Date: August 15, 2013
    August 15, 2013
  • ‘Day One’ for Olinguito
    Zoologist Kristofer Helgen brings a stuffed olinguito to the PBS NewsHour studio Thursday. The furry mammal is a brand new species, unveiled today by Smithsonian zoologists. Kristofer calls it a special discovery, spanning 10 years of research. He talks about the research, and what research lies ahead for the animal that lives in the canopy of tall trees in the mountains of Colombia and Ecuador.
    Original Air Date: August 15, 2013
    August 15, 2013
  • Obama Condemns Violence in Egypt, Cancels Military Exercises
    After security forces attempted to forcibly shut down Pro-Morsi sit-ins, the country erupted into chaotic violence that has left hundreds dead and thousands injured. President Barack Obama addressed press from Martha's Vineyard, Mass.
    Original Air Date: August 15, 2013

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

  • Remembering Jack Germond, Stalwart of Political Journalism
    From Johnson vs. Goldwater in 1964 to Bush vs. Gore in 2000, Jack Germond covered every race. The political reporter, columnist and author, immortalized in the book "Boys on the Bus," has died at 85. Judy Woodruff talks to Dan Balz of The Washington Post about Germond's legacy on the modern political campaign press corps.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 2013
  • March on Washington Had More Radical Roots Than Remembered
    Historian William P. Jones joins Gwen Ifill to offer an overview of how the March on Washington came to be, why President Kennedy feared it would cause negative aftermath and what roles women of color played on that historic day. Their discussion is one a series of conversations looking back at the legacy of August 28, 1963.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 2013
  • Can a Computerized Test Measure Complex Common Core Skills?
    The new "Common Core" sets the standard for learning in America, but how do states test for these new, more complex and career-ready skills? Special correspondent for education John Merrow examines the challenge of measuring things like critical thinking and collaboration facing schools and teachers.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 2013
  • JP Morgan Inquiry Stays Open After Ex-Traders Are Charged
    Two former J.P. Morgan traders have been charged by federal prosecutors for trying to cover up $6.2 billion in bank losses after a series of bad bets. Dawn Kopecki of Bloomberg News joins Judy Woodruff the discuss the current allegations and whether there may be greater consequences for the firm going forward.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 2013
  • Can Egypt Move Forward After Violent Crackdown?
    Jeffrey Brown talks to Michael Giglio of Newsweek from Cairo about the scene at the frontlines of the bloody crackdown and his experience of being detained and beaten by Egyptian security forces, and NewsHour's Margaret Warner and Nathan Brown of George Washington University offer analysis on abandoned negotiation efforts.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 2013
  • The Highs and Lows of Covering Elections on the Campaign Bus
    When Timothy Crouse wrote "The Boys on the Bus" in 1972, he couldn't imagine how much media coverage of presidential elections would change with the rise of the Internet. Media correspondent Terence Smith reports on journalists' not-so-glamorous life on the campaign trail and how digital technology has changed the way media covered campaign politics.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 2013

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

  • Hollywood Ending for 'Ocean's 16' Lottery Winners
    In New Jersey, 16 Ocean County employees hit it big last week, winning a third of a $448 million Powerball jackpot. The lucky group of co-workers, who call themselves "Ocean's 16" after the famous film, explain how they feel about taking home $3.8 million each.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2013
  • Public School Students
    In the past, public school standards varied state to state.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2013
    Students fill a hallway at Coolidge High School in Washington, D.C., between classes May 1, 2014. Coolidge opened as a whites-only school in 1940, today it's students are almost exclusively African-American and Latino and from low-income households.
    August 13, 2013
  • Egyptian Foreign Minister on Struggle to Resolve Protests
    The continuing stand off between the interim government and sit-in protesters continues in Egypt despite International pressure to resolve the issue through dialogue rather than violence. Egyptian foreign minister Nabil Fahmy joins Margaret Warner to discuss his nation's effort to restore a sense of security for Egyptians.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2013
  • New Yorkers Weigh Safety and Harassment of 'Stop and Frisk'
    A federal judge declared that New York City's "Stop and Frisk" policy unfairly targets minorities, but New York's police commissioner says "race is never a reason to conduct a stop." Special correspondent William Brangham talks to New Yorkers who support the tactic, as well as citizens who have been targeted who say otherwise.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2013
  • Is North Carolina's Voter ID Law 'Common Sense' Policy?
    North Carolina's new voter ID law is the first to be passed since the Supreme Court struck down part of the Voting Rights Act. Starting in 2016, voters will have to present a government-issued photo ID at the polls. Judy Woodruff hears debate from Democratic Rep. G.K. Butterfield and Tom Murry, a Republican state representative.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2013
  • News Wrap: Israel Moves Ahead With Housing Construction Plan
    In other news Tuesday, Israel announced it will build 900 new homes in East Jerusalem despite criticism from Palestinians and State Secretary John Kerry. Israel also released 26 Palestinian prisoners as part of peace negotiations. Also, the Israeli military shot down a rocket launched at a town near the Egyptian border.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2013
  • Justice Department: Airline Merger Will Make Prices Soar
    A move by the Department of Justice may ground a $11 billion merger between American Airlines and U.S. Airways. A suit filed in federal court claims the merger would hurt competition and make flying more expensive for consumers. Jeffrey Brown talks to Phil Mattingly, who has been covering the story for Bloomberg News.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2013
  • Public School Students
    In the past, public school standards varied state to state.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2013
    Students fill a hallway at Coolidge High School in Washington, D.C., between classes May 1, 2014. Coolidge opened as a whites-only school in 1940, today it's students are almost exclusively African-American and Latino and from low-income households.
    August 13, 2013
  • Egypt's Foreign Minister on Mideast Peace Prospects
    Egyptian Foreign Minister Nabil Fahmy said Tuesday that while he intended to stay involved in Israeli-Palestinian peace efforts, he wasn't overly optimistic with the latest round of talks since they had failed so many times in the past.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2013
  • Ballets Russes Inspires New Choregraphy in 21st Century
    In conjunction with the National Gallery of Art's exhibit "Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes," choreographer Dana Tai Soon Burgess choreographed a new dance, "Revenant Elegy," inspired by the exhibit. Normally, an art museum would not be in the business of commissioning dance, but without seeing the physicality of dance, it is hard to understand the importance of the Ballets Russes.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2013

Monday, August 12, 2013

  • Do License Plate Readers Prevent Crime or Abuse Privacy?
    Law enforcement agencies use license plate readers to help track stolen vehicles and deter crime through behavioral profiling. Does creating databases of this information compromise citizens' privacy? Jeffrey Brown gets two views from technology consultant Sid Heal and Catherine Crump of the American Civil Liberties Union.
    Original Air Date: August 12, 2013
  • 'Whitey' Bulger Reacted to Convictions 'Like a Poker Player'
    Boston mob boss James "Whitey" Bulger was found guilty of more than 30 criminal charges, including racketeering, extortion and 11 murder counts. Judy Woodruff talks to Kevin Cullen of the Boston Globe, who was in the courtroom for the verdict, about the reactions from victims' families and by Bulger himself.
    Original Air Date: August 12, 2013
  • Broken Bolts Is Latest Woe for Late, Over Budget Bay Bridge
    Decades after an earthquake hit San Francisco's Bay Bridge, damaging a 2.2 mile stretch connecting the city to Oakland, a new replacement section is nearly complete. NewsHour correspondent Spencer Michels reports on the project's history of delays, cost overruns and challenges, including the latest problem: broken bolts.
    Original Air Date: August 12, 2013

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