Thursday, November 24, 2011

  • Author Takes Fresh Look at Shaping of U.S. Cultural, Political Landscape
    In his new book, author and historian Colin Woodard explores how America was shaped by settlement patterns dating back to the time of the first Thanksgiving. Margaret Warner talks with Woodard about "American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America."
    Original Air Date: November 24, 2011
  • In Aftermath of Financial Crisis, Who's Being Held Responsible?
    As anger over the financial crisis lingers, questions remain as to who has been held accountable for their role in creating the conditions that led to the meltdown ... and who has not. Ray Suarez reports.
    Original Air Date: November 24, 2011
  • After Infusion of New Energy, 'Occupy D.C.' Shows No Signs of Letting Up
    Hari Sreenivasan reports on the 'Occupy' movement in Washington, D.C., where demonstrators have settled in after getting a shot in the arm from some energetic protesters who traveled down from New York City.
    Original Air Date: November 24, 2011
  • What's on the Menu in School Cafeterias?
    Lawmakers recently weighed in on what's in school lunches, a battle that attracted a great deal of attention from the food industry. Judy Woodruff reports.
    Original Air Date: November 24, 2011
  • Retailers Kick Off Holiday Shopping Season Early
    Friday is the traditional kickoff of the holiday retail season, but some stores are opening a day early. Correspondent Tom Bearden looks at how that's playing out in Denver, Colo., where some say the rush to start shopping is infringing on the Thanksgiving holiday.
    Original Air Date: November 24, 2011

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

  • After Commission Documents Torture Incidents, What's Next for Bahrain?
    An independent commission released findings on the upheavals that shook the tiny Persian Gulf kingdom of Bahrain earlier this year and the crackdown that followed. Margret Warner discusses the events and the Bassiouni report with Bahrain's finance minister, Sheikh Ahmed al-Khalifa, and the editor of al Wasat, Mansoor al Jamri.
    Original Air Date: November 23, 2011
  • Bachmann: Gingrich's Immigration Stance 'Most Liberal' in GOP Race
    In an interview Wednesday with Jeffrey Brown, GOP presidential hopeful Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., discussed her GOP rivals' views on immigration, her choice of language on the campaign trail, what the U.S. should do with enemy combatants and criticized the Obama adminstration for its handling of the Solyndra loan guarantee.
    Original Air Date: November 23, 2011
  • Independent Commission: Bahrain Tortured Activists in Deadly Crackdown
    Young people and police clashed Wednesday in Bahrain as an independent commission released its findings on the upheavals that shook the tiny Persian Gulf kingdom earlier this year and the deadly crackdown that followed. Margret Warner reports.
    Original Air Date: November 23, 2011
  • Tiny Mussels Invade Great Lakes, Threaten Fishing Industry
    Tiny mussels are invading the Great Lakes, threatening the health of the waterways and the livelihoods of fishermen. Ash-har Quraishi of WTTW Chicago reports.
    Original Air Date: November 23, 2011
  • GOP Hopefuls Draw Sharp Divisions on Foreign Policy at Debate
    Eight Republican candidates gathered Tuesday night in Washington, D.C., for their 11th debate, which centered on foreign policy and national security. Ray Suarez recaps the debate with NPR's Ari Shapiro.
    Original Air Date: November 23, 2011

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

  • 'Frontline' Investigates How Mumbai Mastermind Slipped Through the Cracks
    The 2008 terror attacks in Mumbai, India, that killed 166 people were masterminded by Pakistani-American David Coleman Headley. Margret Warner and Sebastian Rotella of ProPublica and Frontline discuss how American law enforcement and intelligence agencies missed several opportunities to thwart his plot.
    Original Air Date: November 22, 2011
  • Gauging Foreign Policy's Importance in GOP Race
    What role will foreign policy and national security play in the Republicans' 2012 nomination fight? Judy Woodruff explores those questions and previews Tuesday night's debate with historian Richard Norton Smith and Washington Post columnist Michael Gerson.
    Original Air Date: November 22, 2011
  • Accelerators Groom Technology Ventures for Success
    The Kauffman Foundation, which studies entrepreneurship, recently found that startups create about 3 million new jobs a year. Hari Sreenivasan reports on efforts to nurture promising companies and bring them to market faster.
    Original Air Date: November 22, 2011
  • After Failed Deficit Deal, Obama Pushes Payroll Tax Cut Extensions
    The failure of the deficit supercommittee echoed Tuesday on the campaign trail as President Obama pressed Republicans in New Hampshire to support extending payroll tax cuts for another year. Ray Suarez discusses the failed congressional effort with Paul Krugman of Princeton University and Martin Feldstein of Harvard University.
    Original Air Date: November 22, 2011
  • In Egypt, Split Seen Between Protesters, Organized Political Groups
    Violent clashes between protesters and security forces continued Tuesday in central Cairo, but the country's military rulers appeared to give ground on political reforms. Jeffrey Brown discusses what's next for Egypt's "unfinished revolution" with Mervat Hatem of Howard University.
    Original Air Date: November 22, 2011
  • Can Elite Tech Startup Schools Teach the Next Big Thing?
    Tech startup schools are recruiting the top companies for a chance to cash-in on the next big idea. Hari Sreenivasan reports.
    Original Air Date: November 22, 2011

Monday, November 21, 2011

  • How Startups Are Key to Job Growth
    With new jobs being so difficult to find in this economy, some say startups may be the answer. These companies are bringing not only new ideas, but new jobs to cities across the United States and the world.
    Original Air Date: November 21, 2011
  • When Can Failure Equal Success?
    You can't be successful until you fail? It might sound odd, but founders of top startup accelerators couldn't agree more. Learn how this credo with roots in Silicon Valley is helping shape the global entrepreneurial landscape.
    Original Air Date: November 21, 2011
  • Tech Experts Say U.S. Immigration Laws Keep Top Talent Away
    Investors and entrepreneurs complain that the startup visa is being confused with wider immigration policy, and that it is stifling innovation..
    Original Air Date: November 21, 2011
  • Is Your Startup TechStars Material?
    TechStars founder David Cohen describes the type of people he looks to recruit for his startup accelerator and the benefits for those lucky enough to be selected.
    Original Air Date: November 21, 2011
  • AngelPad Gives Select Startups 10 Weeks to Shine
    Thomas Korte, founder and managing partner of AngelPad, identifies the three step process a select few startups embark on during the 10 week program. Only 15 companies were chosen by AngelPad from a pool of 2000 applications.
    Original Air Date: November 21, 2011
  • What is a Startup Accelerator?
    Wade Roush of Xconomy, a network of sites that cover innovation and entrepreneurship, explains the basics about the startup accelerator movement spreading across the globe in this Q & A session.
    Original Air Date: November 21, 2011
  • Book Chronicles Fight to Save Web From Sophisticated Computer Worm
    In "Worm: The First Digital World War," journalist Mark Bowden chronicles computer security experts' campaign to detect and defeat a sophisticated new computer worm. Margret Warner and Bowden discuss the Conficker worm, which was first detected in 2008 and ultimately invaded at least 12 million computers worldwide.
    Original Air Date: November 21, 2011
  • As Poorest U.S. City, Reading Also Struggling With High Dropout Rate
    One city's struggle to regain its economic footing is also tied to significant problems in its schools. Jeffrey Brown reports from Reading, Pa., as part of our American Graduate series.
    Original Air Date: November 21, 2011
  • UC Davis Officials Under Fire Amid Outrage Over 'Occupy' Pepper Spraying
    There was continuing criticism Monday about University of California, Davis police dousing student activists with pepper spray at close range during demonstrations over the weekend. Correspondent Spencer Michels reports.
    Original Air Date: November 21, 2011
  • Egypt Faces 'Fateful Turning Point' With Elections in Jeopardy
    Clashes between police and protesters moved into a third day in Cairo's Tahrir Square on Monday. Ray Suarez discusses the increasingly deadly mix of politics and violence in Egypt with GlobalPost's Charles Sennott.
    Original Air Date: November 21, 2011
  • Deficit Supercommittee Admits Failure: Now What?
    The bipartisan congressional committee charged with cutting the U.S. deficit admitted failure on Monday. Judy Woodruff discusses the legislative logjam with Norman Ornstein of the American Enterprise Institute, Maya MacGuineas of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget and Henry Aaron of the Brookings Institution.
    Original Air Date: November 21, 2011
  • Weekly Poem: 'Radio Crackling, Radio Gone' by Lisa Olstein
    Lisa Olstein is the author of the collections, "Radio Crackling, Radio Gone" (Copper Canyon Press, 2006), winner of the Hayden Carruth Award, and "Lost Alphabet" (Copper Canyon Press, 2009). She is associate director of MFA Program for Poets and Writers at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.
    Original Air Date: November 21, 2011

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