Thursday, June 16, 2011

  • Certain Antibiotics Spur Widening Reports of Severe Side Effects
    There are rising concerns regarding a class of antibiotics that some people say are making them very ill. Health Correspondent Betty Ann Bowser reports on some of the patients who have developed severe side-effects.
    Original Air Date: June 16, 2011
  • Justices Rule That Age Matters in Miranda Warnings
    The Supreme Court ruled in a 5-4 decision that juveniles suspected of a crime are entitled to Miranda protections. Ray Suarez asks Marcia Coyle for details.
    Original Air Date: June 16, 2011
  • Romney Tells Floridians 'I'm Also Unemployed'
    GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney told a group of jobless Americans in Tampa Bay, Florida, that he could sympathize with their worries because he was unemployed as well.
    Original Air Date: June 16, 2011
  • Outgoing Secretary Gates on U.S.-Pakistan Ties: 'We Need Each Other'
    With Robert Gates' days at the Pentagon numbered, Kwame Holman looks back at the retiring defense secretary's service during tumultuous times under Presidents Bush and Obama.
    Original Air Date: June 16, 2011
  • Chance of Greek Bailout Default Worries Global Markets
    Anxiety over the Greek debt crisis spooked markets in Europe and Asia again Thursday as investors worry about problems there spreading. Meanwhile, Greece's prime minister held an emergency Socialist Party meeting but delayed a Cabinet reshuffle until Friday. Daisy McAndrew of Independent Television News reports form London.
    Original Air Date: June 16, 2011
  • Zawahiri Takes Lead of al-Qaida, Vows 'Blood for Blood' for Bin Laden's Death
    The death of Osama bin Laden left many have been asking who will control al-Qaida. The answer came Thursday in a statement posed on an Islamic website saying that Ayman al-Zawahri will now have "general leadership of al-Qaida." Jeffrey Brown discusses the shift in leadership with The Boston Globe's Juliette Kayyem and Georgetown University's Daniel Byman.
    Original Air Date: June 16, 2011
  • Greek Debt Crisis Adds New Gravity to U.S. Deficit Debate
    Demonstrators took to the streets in Greece and their government braced for a shake-up as that country grapples with a debt crisis with global repercussions. Judy Woodruff asks two economics experts for views on the fallout.
    Original Air Date: June 16, 2011
  • Defense Secretary Gates Delivers Final News Conference
    Defense Secretary Robert Gates, who is set to retire at the end of June, and Adm. Mike Mullen, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, answered questions about the war in Afghanistan, strained relations with Pakistan, and upheaval in Libya, Syria and Yemen
    Original Air Date: June 16, 2011
  • Weiner Says He's Resigning, Apologizes for Scandal
    Rep. Anthony Weiner, D-N.Y., announced Thursday afternoon that hewould succumb to bipartisan calls for him to resign his seat over aweeks-long Internet scandal.
    Original Air Date: June 16, 2011

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

  • Sri Lankan Government Accused of Human Rights Abuses Near Civil War's End
    It's been just two years since some resemblance of peace returned to the island nation of Sri Lanka, with its 25-year civil war drawing to a close. But now, Britain's Independent Television News charges that government forces herded thousands of Tamil civilians into a "no-fire zone" and opened fire on them. Ray Suarez reports.
    Original Air Date: June 15, 2011
  • News Wrap: Thousands of Greeks Protests New Austerity Measures
    In other news Wednesday, Greece's government was engulfed by political rebellion in Parliament and new rioting broke out in the streets as more than 25,000 demonstrators marched against new austerity measures. Also, U.S.-Pakistani tensions grew after word that Pakistan had arrested five people who helped locate Osama bin Laden.
    Original Air Date: June 15, 2011
  • Libya, War Powers Start White House, Congress on Collision Course
    The Obama administration said Wednesday that the U.S. is not engaged in sustained fighting in Libya and has no troops on the ground, so there's no need for congressional approval. Jeffrey Brown discusses the War Powers Resolution legal wrangling with American University's Jamin Raskin and The New York Times' Charlie Savage.
    Original Air Date: June 15, 2011
  • 'Fracking' for Natural Gas Continues to Raise Health Questions
    A natural gas extraction method known as fracking is under sharp scrutiny in several states. Tom Bearden reports from Colorado.
    Original Air Date: June 15, 2011
  • Wisc. Court Rules Collective Bargaining, but Divisions Remain
    The Wisconsin Supreme Court ruled in a 4-3 decision to uphold a law, backed by Republican Gov. Scott Walker, which denies some public workers collective bargaining rights. Judy Woodruff discusses what's next for the law and the continuing fall out with Wisconsin Public TV's Adam Schrager.
    Original Air Date: June 15, 2011
  • Skateboarding as Catalyst for Change in War-Torn Afghanistan
    The documentary "Skateistan" chronicles a program in Afghanistan that lets kids be kids. It's part of the Economist Film Project.
    Original Air Date: June 15, 2011
  • War Crimes Accusations Emerge Over Civil War in Sri Lanka
    It's been just two years since some resemblance of peace returned to Sri Lanka after more than 25 years of civil war. Ray Suarez discusses new accusations of war crimes with Sri Lanka's ambassador to the United States, Jaliya Wickramasuriya and The International Crisis Group's Mark Schneider.
    Original Air Date: June 15, 2011
  • Crooked Still Makes Old Songs New
    Members of the band Crooked Still say call their style of music "Chambergrass", a fusion of chamber music and bluegrass. The five piece group plays a combination of traditional ballads and original tunes with their banjo, fiddle, cello, upright bass, and vocal instrumentation.
    Original Air Date: June 15, 2011

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

  • Twitter Is Everywhere Now, but Can It Make Money?
    From the U.S. Navy SEAL raid that kill Osama bin Laden to Rep. Anthony Weiner's scandal, Twitter has been in the news recently for helping break news. While the social media giant's popularity has soared among politicians, movie stars and people around the world, can the microblogging service make money? Spencer Michels reports.
    Original Air Date: June 14, 2011
  • New FDA Guidelines Help Consumers Spot Sunscreen Effectiveness
    The FDA announced Tuesday a series of changes in what consumers will see on sunscreen labels beginning next summer. Judy Woodruff discusses the new rules with The Skin Cancer Foundation's Dr. Ali Hendi.
    Original Air Date: June 14, 2011
  • In GOP's N.H. Debate, a 'Tough Night' for Pawlenty as Bachmann Builds Buzz
    New Hampshire played host to its first 2012 Republican presidential debate Monday with the candidates spending most of the evening criticizing President Obama's performance in the White House. Gwen Ifill and Political Editor David Chalian review the debate's highlights and lowlights.
    Original Air Date: June 14, 2011
  • Syrian Refugee Exodus Continues as Tanks, Troops Push Into More Towns
    Syrian refugees continued to stream across the border into Turkey Tuesday, fleeing the military's drive to crush anti-government demonstrations in northern towns and villages. Margaret Warner reports.
    Original Air Date: June 14, 2011
  • 'Spiderman' Musical Opens and Broadway Holds Its Breath
    One of the biggest financial bets in the history of theater is scheduled to open on Broadway this week. Jeffrey Brown discusses "Spider-Man: Turn Off The Dark" with The New York Times' Patrick Healy.
    Original Air Date: June 14, 2011
  • Obama's Visit to Puerto Rico Highlights Island's Place in U.S. Politics
    President Obama made a brief visit Tuesday to Puerto Rico's capital -- the first official trip to the commonwealth by a sitting president since 1961. Ray Suarez discusses the president's visit, statehood and the island's economy with Puerto Rico Gov. Luis Fortuno.
    Original Air Date: June 14, 2011
  • Biz Stone: Twitter Breaks News, 'But That's Not the Full Story'
    In an interview with the NewsHour's Spencer Michels, Twitter co-founder Biz Stone discusses the messaging service's global impact on breaking news, how it's helping shape humanity by connecting diverse people in new and interesting ways, and why many Twitter employees feel they are doing "the most meaningful work of their lives."
    Original Air Date: June 14, 2011
  • Biz Stone: We're 'Only 1% Into Journey That Will Become Twitter'
    In an interview with the NewsHour's Spencer Michels, Twitter co-founder Biz Stone discusses the "young" company's business model, how the company is particular about partnerships and application development. Stone spoke about the company's direction in the short- and long-term, saying that "in many ways, we still are finding our way."
    Original Air Date: June 14, 2011
  • NewsHour Connect: Fronteras Examines the Drug War at Home
    Hari Sreenivasan talks to Alisa Barba and Michel Marizco of "Fronteras: The Changing Americas Desk", a news service that focuses on issues playing out along the U.S.-Mexico Border. They discuss the Fronteras' recent series which takes a multifaceted look at how Americans are affected by and contribute to the ongoing drug conflict.
    Original Air Date: June 14, 2011

Monday, June 13, 2011

  • Stevens: 'I Was Never a Fan of Labels for Justices'
    It's been nearly a year since Justice John Paul Stevens left the bench after the third-longest tenure on the Supreme Court. Stevens sat down with Gwen Ifill to discuss his career, his leadership of the Court's liberal wing, why he doesn't like such labels and how his tennis game is now that he's retired.
    Original Air Date: June 13, 2011
  • 40 Years After Leak, Weighing the Impact of the Pentagon Papers
    In 1971, parts of a secret Pentagon report began to surface in The New York Times calling the Vietnam War's validity into question. Forty years later, the Pentagon Papers were declassified and released in full Monday. Jeffrey Brown discusses the leak's significance with historian Michael Beschloss and journalist Sanford Ungar.
    Original Air Date: June 13, 2011

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