Tuesday, January 8, 2013

  • "The Education of Michelle Rhee" -- Cheating Scandal (2)
    FRONTLINE's "The Education of Michelle Rhee" examines the legacy of the former Chancellor of Washington, D.C. public schools.
    Original Air Date: January 8, 2013
  • "The Education of Michelle Rhee" Cheating Scandal
    FRONTLINE examines the legacy of Michelle Rhee, former Chancellor of Washington, D.C. public schools.
    Original Air Date: January 8, 2013

Monday, January 7, 2013

  • Texas Sen. Ted Cruz on the Deficit, Gun Rights, Immigration
    As part of our series of conversations with new members of Congress, Judy Woodruff talks to Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas. Son of a Cuban immigrant, Cruz discusses his opposition to certain immigration reform policies, his reaction to the Newtown shootings and his views on the fight in Washington over spending and the deficit.
    Original Air Date: January 7, 2013
  • Health Care Spending Increases but Rate Slows With Economy
    While health care spending rose in 2012, it did so only slightly due to the recession and slow overall economic growth. Ray Suarez talks to Health Affairs' Susan Dentzer about the dichotomies of health care spending, including why there has been a slowdown in health care spending when personal out-of-pocket costs have increased.
    Original Air Date: January 7, 2013
  • Major Banks to Pay $8.5 Billion in Settlement Over Housing
    Ten major banks in the U.S. have agreed to $8.5 billion for wrongful foreclosures on homeowners during 2009 and 2010 at the height of the housing crisis. Margaret Warner talks to Guy Cecala of Inside Mortgage Finance and Diane Thomson of the National Consumer Law Center about the improper foreclosures and who will get the money.
    Original Air Date: January 7, 2013
  • News Wrap: Hillary Clinton Returns to Work After Illness
    In other news Monday, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton returned to work at the State Department after being treated for a blood clot found in her head. Meanwhile, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad proposed an end to violence, calling for national reconciliation, but dismissed rebel fighters as "murderous criminals."
    Original Air Date: January 7, 2013
  • Lawmakers Promise Tough Questions for Defense, CIA Nominees
    Judy Woodruff reports on President Obama's nominations of Chuck Hagel for defense secretary and John Brennan for CIA director. Gwen Ifill talks to Jessica Tuchman Mathews of Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and Reuel Marc Gerecht of Foundation for Defense of Democracies about the president's picks.
    Original Air Date: January 7, 2013
  • An Urban STEM school Turns Things Around Against All Odds
    McKinley Technology High School is an application-based Title I school in the heart of Washington, DC. In 2012, the school received a Blue Ribbon School award from the Department of Education for drastic improvement in student performance. Mckinley's student population is 98 percent minority, with 92 percent of students proficient in math and literacy. A rare feat for urban schools.
    Original Air Date: January 7, 2013
  • Brennan and Hagel Nominated for Key National Security Jobs
    In a press conference Jan. 7, 2012, President Barack Obama put forward his nominations for key national security positions. He announced former Republican Sen. Chuck Hagel as his choice for secretary of defense, to replace Leon Panetta, and counterterrorism adviser John Brennan to serve as CIA director.
    Original Air Date: January 7, 2013

Friday, January 4, 2013

  • Shields and Brooks on New Year's, Budget Fights, Chuck Hagel
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks discuss the week's top political news with Judy Woodruff, including the likely nomination of Chuck Hagel for Secretary of Defense, the failure of the latest budget deal to address larger fiscal problems and Washington's inability to make tough choices.
    Original Air Date: January 4, 2013
  • Shields and Brooks on Sandy Relief and Fighting Irish
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Correspondent Hari Sreenivasan for the first Doubleheader of 2013. Today the topics are the politics behind the delay in the vote on relief funds for Hurricane Sandy victims, and the chances of the Notre Dame fighting Irish during the national championship game Monday night.
    Original Air Date: January 4, 2013
  • Firestorm of Criticism for Cabinet Nominee Chuck Hagel
    From pro-Israel groups to gay rights advocates, vested interests are already weighing in on speculated nominees for positions in President Obama's cabinet. Ray Suarez reports on the criticism leveled against Chuck Hagel, one of the front-runners for defense secretary.
    Original Air Date: January 4, 2013
  • Ohio Third Graders Must Learn to Read or Repeat the Year
    Ohio is one of 14 states to put in place a retention rule that holds back students who are not reading at grade level. Special correspondent John Tulenko reports on the "reading guarantee," which educators say puts enormous pressure on them, and may not actually ensure educational success or lower dropout rates in the future.
    Original Air Date: January 4, 2013
  • Syria's Two-Year Conflict Reaches Grim Milestone
    As Syria's civil war nears the two-year mark, the United Nations reports an rapid uptick in casualties: Of the 60,000 mostly-civilians who have been killed, 90 percent died in 2012. Ray Suarez talks to NPR's Deborah Amos about the conflict, the stalemate and its human toll.
    Original Air Date: January 4, 2013
  • Last Jobs Report Shows Slow Growth and Economic Concerns
    The December jobs report showed positive but slow growth, while worries of imminent recession were calmed by the passage of a deal to avert the "fiscal cliff." Is the economy moving in a positive direction? Jeffrey Brown talks to public media journalists about economic concerns for the coming months.
    Original Air Date: January 4, 2013
  • How Are Arts Organizations Using Digital Technologies?
    A new study, "Arts Organizations and Digital Technologies," published Friday by the Pew Internet & American Life Project, looks at the ways in which cultural organizations -- theater companies, orchestras, museums -- are using the Internet, social media and mobile apps to grow, promote and enrich the things they do.
    Original Air Date: January 4, 2013
  • Taxpayers react to fiscal cliff deal
    On New Year's Day Congress approved a tax deal that raises taxes by restoring the payroll tax and taxes on high income earners to prior levels. NewsHour asked taxpapers in Washington, D.C. for their thoughts on the dealmaking and how the plan will affect their household.
    Original Air Date: January 4, 2013

Thursday, January 3, 2013

  • What Al Jazeera's Current TV Acquisition Means
    In an attempt to reach a larger American audience, Al Jazeera English announced plans to purchase cable channel Current TV, first started by former Vice President Al Gore. Ray Suarez talks to Al Jazeera executive producer Robert Wheelock about the Qatar government-owned news organization's move and challenges going forward.
    Original Air Date: January 3, 2013
  • A Journey to Confront Our Aging Water Systems
    As clean water regulations become tougher and sewer systems and water treatment plants become outdated, cities are struggling to stay compliant and safe. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien goes underground to discover the many ways America's sewer systems could be revamped to conserve water and save money.
    Original Air Date: January 3, 2013
  • Rape in India Sparks 'Soul Searching' for Treatment of Women
    Margaret Warner talks to New York Times reporter Heather Timmons about the details of the rape and murder charges over the death of 23-year-old medical student in New Delhi, plus a spreading national discussion and fury over the treatment of women in India.
    Original Air Date: January 3, 2013
  • Six Men Charged With Murder, Kidnapping in Brutal Gang Rape
    Six men were arrested and charged with kidnapping, rape and murder after an attack caused the death of a 23-year-old woman in New Delhi, India. The case sparked demands for stronger laws, tougher police action and a sustained campaign to change society's views on women. Independent Television News' Geraint Vincent reports.
    Original Air Date: January 3, 2013
  • What 'Cliffs' Lay Ahead for Congress for Other Budget Deal?
    The U.S. may have averted the "fiscal cliff," but many issues remain in the budget deal passed by Congress. Jeffrey Brown explores what remains unsolved with Maya MacGuineas of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, American Action Forum's Doug Holtz-Eakin and Robert Reich of University of California, Berkeley.
    Original Air Date: January 3, 2013
  • New Faces, Old Challenges as 113th Congress Convenes
    New lawmakers are arriving on Capitol Hill, but the 113th Congress won't be starting with a clean slate. Judy Woodruff reports on unfinished business and challenges ahead for Congress and House Speaker John Boehner.
    Original Air Date: January 3, 2013
  • 100-Year-Old on No Driving License: "Terrible," but Necessar
    Finnegan still works five days a week but since she can no longer drive, she hitches a ride with a colleague. In our last online conversation, Finnegan discusses the decision to put her driving days behind her, though not until age 94.
    Original Air Date: January 3, 2013
  • Underground: A Hidden World of Water Pipes
    Miles O'Brien interviews Chuck Hersey, a water quality and infrastructure expert of the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments on why it's such a challenge to get people invested in improving infrastructure
    Original Air Date: January 3, 2013
  • What's Ahead for Barney Frank
    In an interview outtake, Paul Solman asks retiring Rep. Barney Frank what he plans to do come Jan. 2013 when he is no longer serving in Congress.
    Original Air Date: January 3, 2013

Wednesday, January 2, 2013

  • What Immigrants Can Teach the Rest of America
    When Claudia Kolker began reporting about recent immigrants to the U.S., she found a wealth of wisdom to be shared with all Americans. Kolker talks to Ray Suarez about her new book, "The Immigrant Advantage: What We Can Learn from Newcomers to America about Health, Happiness and Hope."
    Original Air Date: January 2, 2013
  • Investment in Older Workers Turns a Big Profit
    The average age of Vita Needle's workers is 74 years old, and that's no accident. The manufacturing company has intentionally hired seniors -- a decision that has increased profits and benefited older workers who often have a harder time finding a job. Paul Solman reports on their unique model for doing business.
    Original Air Date: January 2, 2013

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