Tuesday, January 21, 2014

  • Russia hunts for 'black widow' suspects ahead of Sochi games
    In Sochi, Russia, the site of the 2014 Winter Olympics, the images of three women were posted around the city. Known as "black widows," the suspects are believed to be potential suicide bombers, intent on attacking the games. Hari Sreenivasan looks at recent bombings in the region and how Russia and the U.S. are reacting.
    Original Air Date: January 21, 2014
  • Supreme Court considers genesis of 'Raging Bull'
    Gwen Ifill talks to Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal about two cases heard at the Supreme Court. In one, non-unionized health care workers argue they shouldn't have to pay for contract negotiations. Then, can an author's heir claim copyright infringement against the 1980 movie "Raging Bull" decades later?
    Original Air Date: January 21, 2014
  • Low expectations for first round of Syria talks
    Original Air Date: January 21, 2014
  • Helping Filipinos find work in the countryside
    Many Filipinos move into urban slums or leave their country in search of work. But to help lift his nation out of poverty, economist Antonio Meloto wants to turn its citizens into job generators rather than job seekers. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro profiles Meloto’s efforts to encourage businesses in rural areas.
    Original Air Date: January 21, 2014
  • Documents detail church sex abuse in Chicago
    The revelation that the Catholic Archdiocese of Chicago hid decades of child sex abuse was revealed through documents as part of a settlement with victims. The papers describe how church leadership reassigned priests accused of abuse to different parishes. Gwen Ifill talks to Jeff Anderson, attorney for the plaintiffs.
    Original Air Date: January 21, 2014
  • Iran absence casts shadow on Syrian peace talks
    As negotiators began to arrive in Geneva for Syrian peace talks, expectations from both sides seemed irresolvable and Iran's absence was a point of tension. Meanwhile, a new report revealed photographic evidence of the torture and killing and of some 11,000 detainees by the Assad regime. Margaret Warner reports.
    Original Air Date: January 21, 2014
  • News Wrap: Northeast braces for major snowstorm
    In our news wrap Tuesday, a winter storm along the East Coast shuttered government offices and disrupted flight schedules, as New York and other cities prepared for at least a foot of snow. Also, a car bomb in Lebanon targeted supporters of Hezbollah, killing four people and wounding 35 in a Shiite neighborhood of Beirut.
    Original Air Date: January 21, 2014

Monday, January 20, 2014

  • Syrian-American Amal Kassir reads 'My Grandmother's Farm'
    Amal Kassir lived in Syria for many years. She says her time there helped her understand the people's suffering while the freedoms she has in America allowed her to become an activist on their behalf. At 18, she performs slam poetry at festivals and political rallies around the U.S., like her recent performance of "My Grandmother's Farm" at the University of Colorado Denver.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2014
  • How does political uncertainty affect Afghanistan security?
    An American soldier died in a Taliban attack at a military base, which came on the heels of a suicide bombing at a Kabul restaurant that killed 21 civilians. Gwen Ifill talks to Pamela Constable of The Washington Post and Omar Samad, a former Afghan Foreign Ministry spokesman, about instability in Afghanistan.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2014
  • Rediscovering a Martin Luther King Jr. speech
    In November, the only known recording of a 1962 speech made by Martin Luther King Jr. was uncovered. Not heard for more than 50 years, King delivered this notable speech in the wake of a number of attacks on black churches. The NewsHour's Stephen Fee reports on the rediscovered recording and the document that inspired it.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2014
  • The conflict in Syria through the eyes of a young poet
    Instead of weapons, Amal Kassir uses words to fight. An 18-year-old Syrian-American activist, Kassir grew up in Syria, but now lives in the United States, where she performs slam poetry to bring attention to the suffering in the Middle East.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2014
  • World powers dispute on Iran attending Syrian peace talks
    Ahead of a gathering of world powers in Geneva to negotiate an end to Syria's civil war, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon extended an offer for Iran to attend the talks. But when that country rejected a condition of attendance, the invitation was rescinded. Gwen Ifill reports on the diplomatic disarray that ensued.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2014
  • News Wrap: Iran unplugs centrifuges, U.S. begin nuclear deal
    In our news wrap Monday, to begin the interim nuclear deal, Iran unplugged banks of centrifuges used to enrich uranium to high levels. In exchange, the U.S. and European Union announced easing of economic sanctions. Also, a wave of bombings killed at least 31 people near Baghdad.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2014
  • Scientists search for understanding of dark matter
    At the bottom of a nickel mine near Sudbury, Ontario, scientists at one of the world's most sophisticated particle physics observatories are investigating one of the biggest mysteries of the cosmos: What is dark matter? Science correspondent Miles O'Brien helps to shed some light on the research at SNOLAB.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2014
  • Can the tech industry strike the privacy, safety balance?
    Even before President Obama outlined his proposed changes in how the NSA should collect data for surveillance, many tech giants were vocal in their criticism. Gwen Ifill discusses what's at stake with Christian Dawson of the Internet Infrastructure Coalition and Nuala O'Connor of the Center for Democracy and Technology.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2014

Sunday, January 19, 2014

  • Data raises questions about Affordable Care Act's success
    One of the co-authors of a new study on the Affordable Care Act, Christopher Weaver, told PBS NewsHour that new data raises questions about whether the law is succeeding at reducing the number of uninsured Americans. The government expects to lower the number of uninsured by 25 million people in the next 10 years.
    Original Air Date: January 19, 2014
  • College students combat hackers
    Business and government spent around $46 billion in 2013 to guard against malicious cybercriminals. How can the U.S. combat this growing threat? Carnegie Mellon University is training the next generation of cybersecurity experts by teaching them to think like hackers. Correspondent Rick Karr reports.
    Original Air Date: October 26, 2013
  • Is a second scandal ahead for the New Jersey governor?
    As New Jersey Governor Chris Christie’s starts his second term, new allegations have emerged about threats to withhold Hurricane Sandy relief funds from the town of Hoboken. What are the governor's prospects moving forward? Hari Sreenivasan talks to NJTV’s chief political correspondent, Michael Aron, about how Christie’s reputation is faring in the wake of these allegations.
    Original Air Date: January 19, 2014
  • Iraqis continue fight against Al Qaeda in Anbar province
    The battle between Iraqi tribesmen and Al Qaeda forces continued this weekend in the western province of Anbar. What does the situation on the ground look like? Hari Sreenivasan is joined by the Washington Post’s Loveday Morris from Baghdad via Skype to discuss the ongoing violence in the towns of Ramadi and Fallujah.
    Original Air Date: January 19, 2014

Saturday, January 18, 2014

  • Criminal gangs play role in security breaches
    New information emerged Saturday about a holiday security breach at retailers, including Target, which the retail giant said affected over 110 million customers. Who was behind the attack and how did they carry it out? Hari Sreenivasan and Mike Riley at Bloomberg News discuss how overseas criminal gangs may be involved.
    Original Air Date: January 18, 2014
  • European critics react to proposed NSA changes
    In his speech on Friday, President Obama discussed how the U.S. will change its intelligence gathering practices. Hari Sreenivasan spoke with Geoff Dyer, Foreign Policy correspondent at the Financial Times, about the speech and how it was received by American allies, especially those targeted by the NSA’s operations.
    Original Air Date: January 18, 2014
  • Is India’s space program worth the money?
    India's Mars Orbiter Mission is an attempt to become the fourth nation and first Asian country to reach the red planet and a point of great national pride. It will be completed for just over $70 million dollars, a tiny fraction of the cost spent by NASA on similar programs. But is spending any resources on a mission to Mars wise when hundreds of millions of Indians struggle to meet basic needs?
    Original Air Date: January 18, 2014

Friday, January 17, 2014

  • George Halvorson talks differences in health care between U.S. and world
    Original Air Date: January 17, 2014
  • Brooks and Marcus on Obama's surveillance reforms, Benghazi
    New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Ruth Marcus join Gwen Ifill to discuss the week's top political news, including whether or not President Obama went far enough with his recommended surveillance reforms, who's blame for the Benghazi attack and the possibility for new sanctions on Iran.
    Original Air Date: January 17, 2014
  • Syrian opposition undecided about attendance
    The Western-backed Syrian National Coalition is currently meeting in Istanbul to vote on whether it will go to upcoming talks in Geneva, aimed at bringing a political resolution to the war in Syria. Hari Sreenivasan talks to chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner about the internal conflict among the opposition.
    Original Air Date: January 17, 2014
  • India marks three years without polio, but challenges remain
    Health officials in India have hit a milestone in their efforts to eradicate polio: It has been three years since the country's last reported case of the crippling disease. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on India's challenge to remain vigilant in its campaign to immunize children one mouthful at a time.
    Original Air Date: January 17, 2014
  • How to balance cost and quality of health care?
    Judy Woodruff talks to George Halvorson, former CEO of Kaiser Permanente and author of "Don't Let Health Care Bankrupt America," who argues we spend too much money on care that doesn't deliver optimal benefits. How can the U.S. alter its approach to serve all Americans more cost-effectively and with better outcomes?
    Original Air Date: January 17, 2014
  • News Wrap: Man pleads guilty to mailing ricin
    In our news wrap Friday, James Everett Dutschke of Mississippi pleaded guilty to sending letters laced with the toxic substance ricin to the president, a U.S. senator and a judge. Also, California Gov. Jerry Brown declared a drought emergency in light of the state's worst dry spell in 100 years of record-keeping.
    Original Air Date: January 17, 2014

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