Tuesday, July 5, 2011

  • Twin Bombings Near Baghdad Cast Doubts on Iraq's Fragile Security
    In the city of Taji, some 20 miles north of Baghdad, two successive suicide bombings killed at least 37 and wounded another 50 on Tuesday. Gwen Ifill discusses the recent increase in violence and what it means for Iraqi security during the U.S. troop drawdown with The Washington Post's Ed O'Keefe.
    Original Air Date: July 5, 2011
  • Chavez's Health Fuels Political Power Struggle in Venezuela
    Celebrations erupted in Caracas as news spread that Hugo Chavez was back after traveling to Cuba for medical treatment. Ray Suarez gets insight from two analysts.
    Original Air Date: July 5, 2011
  • Cornyn to Obama: Take Tax Hikes Off The Table in Debt Negotiations
    President Obama announced late Tuesday afternoon that he will host bipartisan talks on the deficit Thursday. Jeffrey Brown discusses the negotiations with Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas), who sits on the Senate budget and finance committees.
    Original Air Date: July 5, 2011
  • Weekly Poem: From 'Severance Songs' by Joshua Corey
    Joshua Corey is the author of "Severance Songs" (Tupelo Press, 2011), "Fourier Series" (Spineless Books, 2005) "Selah" (Barrow Street, 2003) and two chapbooks. He teaches at Lake Forest College in Illinois.
    Original Air Date: July 5, 2011
  • Political Checklist: Washington Fireworks in the Sky and in Congress
    Political Editor David Chalian tells Senior Correspondents Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff about viewing the 4th of July fireworks from the White House, and the fireworks that Pres. Obama is much more interested in.With a little more than two weeks to go before the deadline on raising the debt ceiling, Democrats and Republicans on Capitol Hill are still in a deadlock.
    Original Air Date: July 5, 2011

Monday, July 4, 2011

  • Honor Roll for July 4, 2011
    A silent tribute to U.S. soldiers killed while on duty in Iraq and Afghanistan.
    Original Air Date: July 4, 2011
  • From Josh Ritter, a Song That Became a Debut Novel
    "Bright's Passage," the debut novel by singer-songwriter Josh Ritter, details a young man's return home from World War I. Jeffrey Brown and the musician-turned-novelist discuss his first work of fiction.
    Original Air Date: July 4, 2011
  • Report: Female Journalists Facing More Risks, Intimidation Abroad
    A new report shed light on sexual attacks on journalist working overseas. Margaret Warner discusses the findings with Lauren Wolfe of the Committee to Protect Journalists.
    Original Air Date: July 4, 2011
  • Chefs Cook Up Ideas for Healthy School Lunches
    A pair of chefs has stepped out of their kitchens and into school cafeterias to lend their services in hopes of crafting healthier menus for school lunches. Betty Ann Bowser has this encore report.
    Original Air Date: July 4, 2011
  • Campaign Cash Race Is on for GOP '12 Contenders, Obama Campaign
    Republican presidential contenders spent the July 4 holiday on the campaign trail. Lately most have spent their time feverishly dialing for the dollars they will need to support their campaigns. NewsHour Political Editor David Chalian updates us on the race for campaign cash.
    Original Air Date: July 4, 2011
  • Fourth of July Celebrations Draw Families, Troops and Presidential Hopefuls
    Americans at home and abroad celebrated Independence Day with parades, barbeques, and fireworks. Judy Woodruff reports on how Americans celebrated Independence Day here and abroad.
    Original Air Date: July 4, 2011
  • Josh Ritter Sings 'Girl in the War'
    Josh Ritter sings "Girl in the War."
    Original Air Date: July 4, 2011
  • Josh Ritter Reads From His Novel, 'Bright's Passage'
    Josh Ritter reads from his novel, "Bright's Passage."
    Original Air Date: July 4, 2011
  • July 4 Fireworks: Behind the Scenes in the Nation's Capital
    Washington, D.C.'s Independence Day fireworks production, is one of the biggest in the country. Pyro Shows, a Tennessee fireworks display company has been responsible for the show nine years in a row. Tom Stiner from Pyro Shows talks about what goes into pulling a pyrotechnic display of this magnitude.
    Original Air Date: July 4, 2011

Friday, July 1, 2011

  • Shields and Gerson on Budget Impasse, Bachmann Candidacy
    Columnists Mark Shields and Michael Gerson examine the week's top stories, including President Obama's harsh criticism of congressional leaders' efforts to reach a debt limit deal, and Rep. Michele Bachmann's foray into the 2012 presidential race.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2011
  • Protecting Its Fannie: How Mortgage Giant Primed the Bubble, Covered Its Assets
    As part of his Making Sen$e series, Paul Solman reports on the new book, "Reckless Endangerment," which argues that for the past 20 years, Fannie Mae, a government-sponsored enterprise that increases money for homeownership, pursued profits for itself and bought risky loans that inflated a housing bubble that eventually burst.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2011
  • In Syria: 'This Country Is Far From Unified'
    Amid a violent government crackdown, large demonstrations have been held in Syrian cities both for and against President Assad, who has called for dialogue with his opposition. National Public Radio's Deborah Amos speaks with Margaret Warner from Damascus about the ongoing uprising.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2011
  • Syrian Demonstrations Grow as Assad Calls for Dialogue With Opposition
    The nearly four-month-long uprising against President Bashar al-Assad in Syria showed no sign of abating Friday. Margaret Warner reports on some of the largest protests yet, which came 10 days after President Assad offered a dialogue with the opposition.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2011
  • In Strauss-Kahn Case, All Eyes on Accuser's Statements
    Dominique Strauss-Kahn, former head of the International Monetary Fund, was released from house arrest Friday after a court hearing. Jeffrey Brown discusses the state of the charges Strauss-Kahn still faces with Bloomberg Television's Sara Eisen and Loyola Law School's Laurie Levenson.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2011
  • Strauss-Kahn Released From House Arrest as Case Enters Legal Limbo
    After a court hearing Friday in New York, Dominique Strauss-Kahn, former head of the International Monetary Fund, was released from house arrest, but he still faces charges of sexual assault on a hotel maid. Jeffrey Brown reports on the latest developments in the high-profile case.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2011
  • Eleanor Henderson Reads From Her Novel, 'Ten Thousand Saints'
    Eleanor Henderson reads from her novel, "Ten Thousand Saints."
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2011
  • Conversation: Eleanor Henderson, Author of 'Ten Thousand Saints'
    Jeffrey Brown talks to Eleanor Henderson, author of "Ten Thousand Saints," a novel that's garnering strong reviews for its treatment of teens, an underground youth culture and troubled family relationships.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2011

Thursday, June 30, 2011

  • Daley: U.S. Default 'Will Not Happen'
    White House Chief of Staff Bill Daley speaks with Jeffrey Brown about the state of U.S. deficit and debt talks and President Obama's expressions of frustration with Congress at his Wednesday news conference.
    Original Air Date: June 30, 2011
  • Growing Dissent From Youth, Labor Unions Spark Rare Protests in China
    Growing dissent among young people and labor union members has sparked rare protests in China. Independent Television News' John Sparks reports from the southeastern city of Xintang, which saw four days of protests in recent weeks.
    Original Air Date: June 30, 2011
  • Are Social Media Services the Next Tech Bubble?
    The estimated value of tech companies such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn is soaring, but could another tech bubble be building? Ray Suarez discusses the social media services that are at the center of this question with Fortune magazine's Jessi Hempel and Forrester Research's Josh Bernoff.
    Original Air Date: June 30, 2011
  • Denver Hospital Sets the Bar for Patient Safety
    As many as 96,000 people are estimated to die every year from an infection or a medical mistake after going into the hospital. And almost all of those deaths are preventable. Health correspondent Betty Ann Bowser reports from a Denver hospital that has the lowest mortality rate of any academic medical center in the country.
    Original Air Date: June 30, 2011
  • Governments Push for Austerity, but Can it Really Revive Growth?
    Greek Parliament passed a bill to implement a new austerity plan Thursday, and Britain was in the throes of a national civil servant strike. Margaret Warner discusses whether austerity measures will likely help those countries with MIT's Simon Johnson and Mark Weisbort of the Center of Economic Policy and Research.
    Original Air Date: June 30, 2011
  • What Next for Chinese Artist Ai Weiwei?
    Internationally known Chinese artist Ai Weiwei was released from prison last week after a three month detention. Jeffrey Brown gets an update on Ai's situation from Alison Klayman, who has been working on a documentary about him, "Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry," for the past few years, spending a great deal of time with him in Beijing and around the world.
    Original Air Date: June 30, 2011

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