Wednesday, January 2, 2013

  • Investment in Older Workers Turns a Big Profit
    The average age of Vita Needle's workers is 74 years old, and that's no accident. The manufacturing company has intentionally hired seniors -- a decision that has increased profits and benefited older workers who often have a harder time finding a job. Paul Solman reports on their unique model for doing business.
    Original Air Date: January 2, 2013
  • Why Attacks on Humanitarian Workers Are Rising in Pakistan
    Jeffrey Brown talks to Washington Post reporter Pamela Constable about how the recent deaths of health workers and teachers in Pakistan have had a chilling effect on the international aid community and what's behind this uptick in violence.
    Original Air Date: January 2, 2013
  • Divided House Republicans Stall Vote on Storm Relief Aid
    An emergency aid package to provide relief funds for victims of Hurricane Sandy got stalled in Congress as Republicans insisted on offsetting the $60 million in aid with spending cuts before voting. Judy Woodruff talks to Roll Call's Steven Dennis and Washington Post's Neil Irwin about the consequences of that decision.
    Original Air Date: January 2, 2013
  • How Congress Passed a Plan to Avoid the 'Fiscal Cliff'
    Congress stepped back from the brink of financial turmoil after the House passed a tax plan that included the expiration of payroll tax breaks for all and the extension of Bush-era tax cuts for most. Judy Woodruff talks to Roll Call's Steven Dennis and the Washington Post's Neil Irwin about how it will affect most Americans.
    Original Air Date: January 2, 2013
  • Taking Infrastructure for Granted
    Miles O'Brien interviews Greg DiLoreto on the state of our sewer and water infrastructure.
    Original Air Date: January 2, 2013
  • Working at 100 Years Old
    While reporting on needle and tubing manufacturing firm Vita Needle in Needham, Massachusetts recently, we met Rosa Finnegan. The company is known for its elderly workforce (the average worker age is 74) but at 100, Finnegan is the oldest. She still punches in five days a week and has no plans to retire. In this web extra Finnegan, who turns 101 in February, explains why.
    Original Air Date: January 2, 2013
    January 2, 2013
  • Tale of a 100-Year-Old Former Waitress
    At age 100 (and almost 101) Rosa Finnegan still works five days a week at needle and tube manufacturer Vita Needle in Needham, Massachusetts. Finnegan has been working since she was a teenager and has worked at Vita Needle for sixteen years. In this web extra she discusses her days waiting tables.
    Original Air Date: January 2, 2013
  • Barney Frank: How Smart Is Congress?
    In this interview outtake with retiring Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass., Paul Solman asks him about how intelligent his colleagues in Congress are.
    Original Air Date: January 2, 2013

Tuesday, January 1, 2013

  • Obama Praises House Vote on Fiscal Cliff
    President Obama spoke shortly after the House passed a deal to avert the "fiscal cliff" tax increases and spending cuts. He said the deal is “just one step in a broader effort.”
    Original Air Date: January 1, 2013
  • Sen.-elect Deb Fischer on Spending, Gun Control
    A cattle rancher by trade, Sen.-elect Deb Fischer, R-Neb., will be sworn into Congress after an election campaign which surprised many within her own party. Judy Woodruff talks to Fischer about how her experience as a state senator has prepared her for the U.S. Senate, the need to address spending and gun control.
    Original Air Date: January 1, 2013
  • School of Wine Trains Students for Wine Industry Jobs
    With more than 700 vineyards, Washington state has become a premier location for viticulture. One community college has created a winemaking degree that fosters economic, environmental and cultural sustainability in and around the city of Walla Walla where vineyards continue to sprout. Special correspondent John Tulenko reports.
    Original Air Date: January 1, 2013
  • Sandy Recovery at Slow Pace as People Wait for FEMA Relief
    While storm victims of Sandy find hope as some businesses re-open in hard-hit areas, debate on how to rebuild the shore has slowed the pace of recovery. Jeffrey Brown talks to New York Times' Sarah Maslin Nir and New Jersey Public TV's Mike Schneider on how federal disaster relief aid will be used to rebuild smarter and better.
    Original Air Date: January 1, 2013
  • News Wrap: U.S. and World Celebrates the New Year
    In other news Tuesday, New Year celebrations were marked with traditional sights and scenes in the U.S., including the 124th Rose Parade in Pasadena, Calif. Meanwhile, celebrations in the West African nation of Ivory Coast turned deadly after a crowd stampeded a stadium, crushing and killing more than 60 people.
    Original Air Date: January 1, 2013
  • Senate Compromises, But Doubt Remains Over House Response
    The Senate passed a compromise to address the U.S. budget, but House Republicans complained the bill was too heavy on tax increases and too light on spending cuts. Judy Woodruff talks to WNYC's Todd Zwillich for House response to the bill and whether it is likely to pass when it comes to a vote.
    Original Air Date: January 1, 2013
  • Kwame Holman Talks His Favorite Stories of 2012
    NewsHour Correspondent Kwame Holman sat down with us in the newsroom to explain why he enjoyed covering Capitol Hill in 2012. A veteran of political coverage, Kwame noted some emerging trends over the past year on the Hill that he found to be interesting, particularly the increased communication with the public on behalf of House leadership.
    Original Air Date: January 1, 2013
  • Hari Sreenivasan Talks His Favorite Stories of 2012
    In 2012 you may have seen NewsHour Correspondent Hari Sreenivasan reporting from all over the country for the climate change series. Making those stories was his favorite project of the year. Hari and his team traveled across the United States to bring light to climate change through what he calls "the lens of adaptation." Listen to what he enjoyed most about making this series
    Original Air Date: January 1, 2013
  • Ray Suarez Talks His Favorite Story of 2012
    Of the many stories Senior Correspondent Ray Suarez covered in 2012, he was quick to tell us that covering the energy boom in the western part of the United States was his favorite. Ray traveled to and covered what it was like to live and work in the "new oil patch of America." See what he found to be most interesting from that coverage.
    Original Air Date: January 1, 2013
  • Jeff Brown Talks His Favorite Stories of 2012
    Senior Correspondent Jeffrey Brown doesn't have a "most favorite" story of 2012 but rather a variety of "mosts." From poets to celebrities, artists to government officials, see some of the people Jeffrey Brown spoke to in 2012 and what stories made his end of year list.
    Original Air Date: January 1, 2013
  • Gwen Ifill Talks Her Favorite 2012 Story
    With paraphernalia from past campaigns adorning senior correspondent Gwen Ifill's office, it may not come as a big surprise that her favorite story of 2012 was also the Presidential election. However, it wasn't the day-to-day work but reflecting back on it that she enjoyed most, and seeing how technological advancements made campaigning in this election unlike any other.
    Original Air Date: January 1, 2013
  • Judy Woodruff Talks Her Favorite 2012 Story
    The 2012 presidential election was Senior Correspondent Judy Woodruff's favorite story of the year. Her most cherished aspect? Getting to speak with voters across the country and hear what issues mattered to them. "There was real passion on the part of these voters," she explained. "To me that is the most exciting thing about an election."
    Original Air Date: January 1, 2013

Monday, December 31, 2012

  • What Will History Books Have to Say About 2012?
    Judy Woodruff talks to presidential historians Michael Beschloss and Richard Norton Smith about the events from 2012 that will live on in the history, including Hurricane Sandy, the 2012 elections, a mass shooting in Newtown, Conn., China's new leadership, and North Korea's missile launch.
    Original Air Date: December 31, 2012
  • Emancipation Proclamation Celebrates 150 Years
    Issued by President Lincoln on Jan. 1, 1863, the Emancipation Proclamation is one of the defining documents of American democracy and is rarely available for public viewing. Ray Suarez talks to Annette Gordon-Reed of Harvard University about the importance of this historic artifact.
    Original Air Date: December 31, 2012
  • A Chronicle of the '34 Days That Decided' the 2012 Election
    When the Obama campaign decided to spend big on ads early in the presidential race, it was a risky strategy. And it helped lead to Obama's re-election. Margaret Warner talks to Politico's Jonathan Martin and Gleen Thrush about their latest e-book, "The End of the Line": Romney vs. Obama: The 34 Days That Decided the Election."
    Original Air Date: December 31, 2012
  • Hillary Clinton's Hospitalization Sheds Light on Blood Clots
    Days after a fainting spell in her home, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was hospitalized when doctors discovered she had a blood clot between her skull and brain. Ray Suarez talks to Dr. Gholam Motamedi of MedStar Georgetown University Hospital about blood clot causes, risks and potential treatments.
    Original Air Date: December 31, 2012
  • Congress 'Very Close' to Tax Deal, Unresolved on Deficit
    The last day of 2012 marked the last day for Congress to resolve bitter disagreements over tax and deficit issues and prevent the automatic expiration of tax cuts and major budget spending cuts. Judy Woodruff talks to Todd Zwillich of WNYC about the progress but no last-minute deal on Capitol Hill.
    Original Air Date: December 31, 2012
  • The Year of the Welder
    The NewsHour compiled several of the welder's appearances in political advertising this election cycle. All the images and sounds came from 2012 campaign ads.Now that the 2012 election season is behind us, we also talked to several political communication experts about the year's most memorable political advertising archetypes and themes.
    Original Air Date: December 31, 2012
    December 31, 2012
  • Obama: Fiscal Cliff Deal in Sight
    President Obama, speaking in front of a crowd at the White House on New Years Eve, reported that lawmakers have come to an agreement that would prevent tax increases for most Americans, resolving some aspects of the fiscal cliff."I appears that an agreement is within sight, but it is not done," Obama said. "There are still issues to be resolve, but we are hoping Congress can get it done."
    Original Air Date: December 31, 2012
  • Why Barney Frank Took a Cautious Stance on Same-Sex Marriage
    In an exit interview with NewsHour economic correspondent Paul Solman, Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass., explains his initial position on same-sex marriage in 1996, saying that the enthusiasm of some gay rights advocates led them to be tactically and strategically unwise, which prompted Republicans to pass the Defense of Marriage Act.
    Original Air Date: December 31, 2012

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