Friday, June 14, 2013

  • Painful Options Ahead: Detroit Defaults on a Billion Dollars
    The city of Detroit is facing difficult decisions against a $1 billion debt. Emergency manager Kevyn Orr laid out a last-ditch plan to 150 creditors to accept pennies on the dollar to keep the city running. But some residents are skeptical of Orr's approach. Ray Suarez talks to Matt Helms of the Detroit Free Press.
    Original Air Date: June 14, 2013
  • News Wrap: Iranians Head to Polls to Choose New President
    In other news Friday, millions of Iranians headed to the polls to vote for a new president. Despite international criticism over the election process, long lines of men and women could be seen at polling stations across Iran. Also, Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan met with protesters over the fate of an Istanbul park.
    Original Air Date: June 14, 2013

Thursday, June 13, 2013

  • In 'Little Green,' an Old Character Makes an Easy Comeback
    The last time readers heard from detective Easy Rawlins, he was driving off a cliff. But Rawlins, one of the best-known characters in American literature, returns -- alive -- in a new novel called "Little Green." Jeffrey Brown talks to author Walter Mosley about his new book and more.
    Original Air Date: June 13, 2013
  • California Prepares for Fallout as Ruling on Prop. 8 Nears
    In San Francisco, city employees are preparing for a rush of same-sex marriage applications in case the Supreme Court strikes down Proposition 8, which banned marriage for anyone except between a man and a woman. Spencer Michels looks at the history of California's fight on same-sex marriage and previews the court's decision.
    Original Air Date: June 13, 2013
  • Extended Conversation: Novelist Walter Mosley
    When last seen, Ezekiel "Easy" Rawlins was driving over a cliff, apparently to his death. Rawlins is the fictional private eye who, in the course of a dozen books, has become one of the best-known, longest-running characters in American literature. His latest adventure is told in the new mystery novel, "Little Green."
    Original Air Date: June 13, 2013
  • Acceptance for Gay Americans Grows, Discrimination Persists
    A new survey by the Pew Research Center offers a complex view of what it's like to be an LGBT American. The survey found that while 92 percent of LGBT Americans say society is more accepting, 53 percent say they still face discrimination. Ray Suarez talks with Paul Taylor, co-author of the survey, and Gary Gates of UCLA.
    Original Air Date: June 13, 2013
  • Struggling Farmers in India Find Promise in Ancient Seeds
    Since a devastating cyclone hit in 2009, farmers in a region of India have struggled with salty soil. With climate change, that problem is likely to worsen. Special correspondent Sam Eaton reports for the NewsHour's ongoing series "Food for 9 Billion," about how some farmers have returned to ancient seeds for better results.
    Original Air Date: June 13, 2013
  • Supreme Court Unanimously Rules Genes Cannot Be Patented
    In an unanimous decision, the Supreme Court justices ruled that a company cannot patent an isolated human gene. To look at the implications of the decisions and its impact for patients and medical research, Judy Woodruff talks to Todd Dickinson of the American Intellectual Property Law Association and Sandra Park of the ACLU.
    Original Air Date: June 13, 2013
  • Colorado Wildfire Is Most Destructive in State History
    A wildfire in Colorado has become the most destructive in the state's history. The blaze has spread across 94,000 acres, spurred by high winds and hot, dry conditions. The fire continues to burn out of control in a heavily wooded area northeast of Colorado Springs. Jeffrey Brown has an update on the fire and evacuations
    Original Air Date: June 13, 2013
  • U.S. Says Assad Regime Has Used Chemical Weapons
    The Obama administration announced late Thursday that it could conclude that the Syrian government has used chemical weapons against rebels. National Security Advisor Ben Rhodes said the Assad regime has used the nerve agent Sarin on a small-scale multiple times.
    Original Air Date: June 13, 2013

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

  • Era of Online Sharing Offers 'Big Data,' Privacy Trade-Offs
    Revelations about the NSA's secret programs have reinforced a national interest in striking a balance between privacy and security. Jeffrey Brown examines public perception of data monitoring with Jules Polonetsky of the Future of Privacy Forum, Kashmir Hill of Forbes and Viktor Mayer-Schonberger, co-author of "Big Data."
    Original Air Date: June 12, 2013
  • Singapore Looks Skyward to Take Farming in New Directions
    Singapore's skyline is not just a point of pride for residents, it can also be a source of fresh produce. As part of the NewsHour's series "Food for 9 Billion," special correspondent Sam Eaton reports on Singapore's vertical solution to the challenge of feeding a growing population in an urban environment.
    Original Air Date: June 12, 2013
  • 'Whitey' Bulger Trial Stars Institutional Corruption
    Accused mob boss James 'Whitey' Bulger, 83, finally had his day in court after 16 years on the run. Bulger allegedly ran the violent Winter Hill gang in South Boston. He has pleaded not guilty to charges of extortion, racketeering and 19 murders. Gwen Ifill talks to Kevin Cullen of The Boston Globe, who was in the courtroom.
    Original Air Date: June 12, 2013
  • Anti-Government Protests Focus on Democracy in Turkey
    For an update from the ground and to examine the scope and national impact of the protests against the leadership of Turkish Prime Minister Erdogan, Judy Woodruff talks with Scott Peterson of The Christian Science Monitor and Soner Cagaptay of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.
    Original Air Date: June 12, 2013
  • How Big a Boost Do Working Seniors Give the Economy?
    Encore Careers' Marc Freedman sums up the benefits of older workers staying on the job to support the really old and really young: "we could turn the dependency ratio into an abundancy ratio."
    Original Air Date: June 12, 2013
  • Joel Peters, Paramedic
    Joel Peters is a 62-year-old paramedic who works 12-hour shifts. He does not know if he'll be able to retire or what his financial future will hold, but he is sure that he will not be moving from his rural home near Taos, NM.
    Original Air Date: June 12, 2013
    June 12, 2013
  • The Rural / Urban Divide
    While the Great Recession took a toll on everyone, there was a distinct difference between rural and urban America. The percentage of older Americans employed full- or part-time actually declined in the most urban, densely populated counties. In smaller rural counties, however, the number of older Americans in the workforce rose sharply.
    Original Air Date: June 12, 2013
    June 12, 2013
  • 'I Can't Afford to Stop Working Yet.'
    Rather than retire after a long career in the federal government, 63 year old Charles Smith works in a produce department for $10 an hour to support his family.
    Original Air Date: June 12, 2013
  • Paul Solman: 'More Seniors Than Ever, Still on the Job"
    Check out our project, New Adventures for Older Workers, to see how this "video chat" by Paul Solman fits in.
    Original Air Date: June 12, 2013
  • The Paul Solman Interview
    The Paul Solman Interview
    Original Air Date: June 12, 2013

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

  • Appeals Process Added for Kids Waiting for Lung Transplants
    Two terminally ill children with end-stage cystic fibrosis are at the center of a battle about organ transplants. In Philadelphia, a federal judge decided that both kids, who are younger than 12, must be made more of a priority on a waiting list for adult lungs. Ray Suarez gets analysis from Arthur Caplan of New York University.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2013
  • Could Agriculture Bloom in the Desert?
    Thanks to Qatar's harsh desert environment and growing population, researchers have embraced the tiny country as a laboratory to address global concerns. As part of the NewsHour's series "Food for 9 Billion," special correspondent Jon Miller reports on their inventive efforts to ensure water and food security for the future.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2013
  • Justice Department Drops Fight on Morning-After Pill
    The Justice Department reversed its stance on age-restricted access to the emergency contraceptive known as the morning-after pill. Plan B One-Step will now be available to females of all ages without a prescription. NPR's Julie Rovner joins Judy Woodruff to examine the decision.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2013
  • Google Asks Approval on PRISM Program Role Transparency
    After news broke that companies such as as Google, Facebook and Yahoo provided some user information to the PRISM surveillance program, the tech giants have started to grapple with how to comply with government orders while offering more transparency to users. Jeffrey Brown talks to Google's chief legal officer, David Drummond.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2013
  • How the Government Manages Workers With Classified Access
    Edward Snowden's leak of classified NSA documents bring up concerns about the reliance on contractors within the intelligence community. Gwen Ifill talks to Irving Lachow of Center for a New American Security and Dana Priest of The Washington Post about how the government protects employees' access to sensitive information.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2013
  • Google: We Don't Give Government Acesss To Our Servers
    In his first U.S. television interview since the latest news broke of the government's surveillance program, Google's chief legal officer David Drummond told PBS NewsHour senior correspondent Jeffrey Brown on Tuesday that the company has given the U.S. government information on only a "tiny fraction" of its hundreds of millions of users.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2013
  • How Technology Widens Class Divisions
    Paul Solman speaks with Jaron Lanier, widely regarded as the father of virtual reality and the author of “Who Owns the Future?”, about how big computers -- and the government and businesses they empower -- are creating more economic inequality.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2013
  • From Lecture Hall to Graveyard
    Dr. Ronald Stockton has been teaching political science and international relations for decades at the University of Michigan, Dearborn. But rather than sit at his desk, this septuagenarian slips on boots and a wide-brimmed hat and leads his students through hours-long walking tours of the area's historic graveyards.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2013

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