Thursday, February 28, 2013

  • "A Place at the Table" clip 1
    In the new documentary, “A Place at the Table,” single Philadelphia mother Barbie Izquierdo describes her struggle to qualify for government assistance programs to feed her two young children. Barbie’s son Aidan suffers from an immune deficiency disease, which caused hearing and speech problems. Ray Suarez discusses the film with director Lori Silverbush on the PBS NewsHour's health page.
    Original Air Date: February 28, 2013
    February 28, 2013
  • Examining the Decision to Provide Aid to Syrian Opposition
    The U.S. has volunteered for a new role in the Syria conflict: providing food and medical aid to the opposition. To hear how this new decision may impact the situation, Ray Suarez talks with Steven Heydemann of the United States Institute of Peace and Steven Simon of the International Institute for Strategic Studies.
    Original Air Date: February 28, 2013
  • Bradley Manning Leaked Classified Documents to Spark Debate
    Bradley Manning, the U.S. Army private charged with leaking documents to the website WikiLeaks, pleaded guilty to 10 of 22 charges, admitting he violated military regulations, but not federal espionage laws. Judy Woodruff interviews Charlie Savage of the New York Times and Arun Rath of FRONTLINE for impressions of Manning.
    Original Air Date: February 28, 2013
  • Looking Ahead to Papal Conclave as Benedict XVI Leaves
    Officially in retirement, Benedict XVI leaves a papacy flagged with controversies and crises. To discuss what role the emeritus pontiff will now play in the Catholic Church and what's ahead for the papal conclave, Jeffrey Brown talks with John Allen, reporting from Rome for CNN and National Catholic Reporter.
    Original Air Date: February 28, 2013
  • Conversation: Mary Zimmerman's 'Metamorphoses'
    Jeffrey Brown talks to writer and director Mary Zimmerman about her play "Metamorphoses."
    Original Air Date: February 28, 2013
  • Poet David Ferry Reads From His Collection 'Bewilderment'
    Poet David Ferry reads from his collection "Bewilderment," which won last year's National Book Award for poetry.
    Original Air Date: February 28, 2013

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

  • Rosa Parks Immortalized With Statue at U.S. Capitol
    A statue of civil rights icon Rosa Parks was unveiled in the U.S. Capitol's Statuary Hall. Parks was the first woman and only the second African-American to lie in state in the rotunda after she died in 2005. Gwen Ifill reports on the ceremony.
    Original Air Date: February 27, 2013
  • Remembering Van Cliburn, 78, Classical Pianist
    Van Cliburn first gained worldwide attention when he won the first International Tchaikovsky Piano Competition in Moscow at 23. Cliburn died at home at the age of 78 after a battle with bone cancer. In 2008, Jeffrey Brown profiled the musician, reflecting on Cliburn's momentous competition and later life.
    Original Air Date: February 27, 2013
  • Decreasing Snowfall Sends Winter Sports Industry Downhill
    While winter storms have blasted parts of the Midwest and Northeast, a lack of steady and deep snow -- less accumulation and faster melt -- has had serious effects for the ski industry. Hari Sreenivasan reports on how winter sports businesses are navigating the season as part of the Coping with Climate Change series.
    Original Air Date: February 27, 2013
  • Will Yahoo! Ban on Telecommuting Ensure Innovation?
    Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer announced that employees cannot work from home, sparking debates on whether that ban will really help productivity or innovation. Joining Gwen Ifill to discuss Yahoo!'s decision is John Sullivan of San Francisco State University and Micheline Maynard of Forbes.
    Original Air Date: February 27, 2013
  • Examining the Political Push for Tighter Gun Laws
    Parents of the victims of the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary advocated to the Senate for stricter gun laws, and California Democrat Sen. Diane Feinstein called for a ban on assault weapons. Ray Suarez reports on the political push to address gun violence.
    Original Air Date: February 27, 2013
  • Is Discrimination Provision of Voting Rights Act Relevant?
    Does the U.S. still need the Voting Rights Act? Or have we made extraordinary progress fighting racial discrimination, making it obsolete? Judy Woodruff talks with representatives from both sides of the argument: Hans von Spakovsky of the Heritage Foundation and Sherrilyn Ifill from the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.
    Original Air Date: February 27, 2013
  • Supreme Court Hears Arguments on Voting Rights Act
    The Supreme Court heard arguments over a provision in the landmark Voting Rights Act, which requires states with a history of racial discrimination to get approval by the Justice Department before making any changes to voting rules. Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal was in court and talks to Ray Suarez.
    Original Air Date: February 27, 2013
  • Shrinking Snow Means Steep Slide for Ski Industry
    Skiers, snowboarders, snowmobilers and snowshoers all rely on long, snowy winters for their sports. But climate change is already shrinking the number of snow days in the United States, and future changes spell trouble for the whole industry.
    Original Air Date: February 27, 2013

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

  • Do You Remember When the Voting Rights Act Passed?
    Do you remember when the Voting Rights Act became law? How did that change affect your life and your community during the Civil Rights Movement? How did you see if affect others? Call the PBS NewsHour Oral History Hotline at (703) 594-6PBS to share your story.
    Original Air Date: February 26, 2013
  • How to Make Snow
    Rich Burkley, vice president of mountain operations for Aspen Skiing Company, explains what it takes to make enough snow to open the resort each year, especially as climate change threatens to shorten the ski season.
    Original Air Date: February 26, 2013
    February 26, 2013
  • Gloria Steinem: Women Can't 'Have It All' Until Equality
    A new PBS documentary, "Makers: Women Who Make America," looks at the women's movement and the groundbreaking contributions and struggles made by women today. Judy Woodruff interviews activist Gloria Steinem about the film and about the current state of feminism and gender equality.
    Original Air Date: February 26, 2013
  • Memories of Violence Haunt Upcoming Election in Kenya
    After the disputed presidential election of December 2007, Kenya fell into chaos as neighbors from different tribal ethnic groups turned on each other in violence. Five years later, Kenyans are worried that history may repeat itself as they prepare for new elections. Special correspondent Kira Kay reports.
    Original Air Date: February 26, 2013
  • Police Collecting DNA From Criminals Reaches Supreme Court
    A man was arrested in Maryland and police officers took a DNA sample that connected him to an unrelated crime. The Supreme Court is now weighing whether the Fourth Amendment should protect him from that kind of search. Ray Suarez gets analysis and context on the case from Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal.
    Original Air Date: February 26, 2013
  • Did Embattled Confirmation Process Weaken Hagel?
    The Senate voted to confirm former Nebraska Sen. Chuck Hagel as the next defense secretary by a vote of 58-41, after 18 Republicans joined with Democrats to end a filibuster blocking the nominee. Judy Woodruff talks to Mark Thompson of Time magazine about whether the confirmation fight affects Hagel at the start of his tenure.
    Original Air Date: February 26, 2013
  • Bernanke Warns Sequester Could Slow Economic Recovery
    Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke warned Congress that the automatic spending cuts slated to take effect Friday could put a drag on economic growth. Gwen Ifill talks to economist Nariman Behravesh about whether political paralysis will affect the economy and how consumers are shrugging off Washington dysfunction.
    Original Air Date: February 26, 2013
  • Living with the Wolves
    From 1990 to 1996, Jim and Jamie Dutcher lived in a tented camp on the edge of Idaho's Sawtooth Wilderness, where they observed and studied the behavior and social hierarchy among a pack of gray wolves, known as the Sawtooth Pack. Their new book, "The Hidden Life of Wolves documents that experience.
    Original Air Date: February 26, 2013
    February 26, 2013

Monday, February 25, 2013

  • Newsmaker Interview with Surgeon General C. Everett Koop
    The PBS NewsHour interviewed former Surgeon General, Dr. C. Everett Koop, on the anniversary of the first surgeon general's report on smoking. Jim Lehrer interviewed Koop for a newsmaker conversation for the The MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour from the surgeon general’s office in Washington on Jan. 11, 1989. Koop died Monday at the age of 96.
    Original Air Date: February 25, 2013
  • Does the White House Use Social Media to Circumvent Press?
    NewsHour's political editor Christina Bellantoni and the Daily Download's Lauren Ashburn and Howard Kurtz highlight President Obama's hosting of a Google Hangout to discuss the ways the White House utilizes social media, and whether the administration prefers dealing more with the public than the press.
    Original Air Date: February 25, 2013
  • Troubles for the Holy See Ahead of Papal Elections
    Margaret Warner talks with Jason Horowitz is at the Vatican covering this evolving story for The Washington Post. What drpve the vatican to issue these public
    Original Air Date: February 25, 2013
  • India Organizes One of Largest ID Registration Drives Ever
    Indian authorities aim to issue all national citizens an official biometric identification card and number in order to combat crime and corruption. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro examines the effectiveness of this effort as part of our Agents for Change series.
    Original Air Date: February 25, 2013
  • Sen. Leahy: Time for U.S. and Cuba to Discuss Relationship
    Sen. Patrick Leahy returned from a congressional delegation to Cuba, where U.S. lawmakers tried unsuccessfully to secure the release of American Alan Gross, who is serving a 15-year prison sentence. Ray Suarez talks to the senator about that trip and about President Raoul Castro's announcement he will leave office in 2018.
    Original Air Date: February 25, 2013
  • Adding Up and Breaking Down Health Care's Big Price Tags
    Why does a few days of lab work end up costing more than the price of a car? Judy Woodruff interviews journalist Steven Brill about his Time magazine cover story about how and why the private marketplace isn't working in the healthcare industry.
    Original Air Date: February 25, 2013

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