Friday, July 1, 2011

  • Shields and Gerson on Budget Impasse, Bachmann Candidacy
    Columnists Mark Shields and Michael Gerson examine the week's top stories, including President Obama's harsh criticism of congressional leaders' efforts to reach a debt limit deal, and Rep. Michele Bachmann's foray into the 2012 presidential race.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2011
  • Protecting Its Fannie: How Mortgage Giant Primed the Bubble, Covered Its Assets
    As part of his Making Sen$e series, Paul Solman reports on the new book, "Reckless Endangerment," which argues that for the past 20 years, Fannie Mae, a government-sponsored enterprise that increases money for homeownership, pursued profits for itself and bought risky loans that inflated a housing bubble that eventually burst.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2011
  • In Syria: 'This Country Is Far From Unified'
    Amid a violent government crackdown, large demonstrations have been held in Syrian cities both for and against President Assad, who has called for dialogue with his opposition. National Public Radio's Deborah Amos speaks with Margaret Warner from Damascus about the ongoing uprising.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2011
  • Syrian Demonstrations Grow as Assad Calls for Dialogue With Opposition
    The nearly four-month-long uprising against President Bashar al-Assad in Syria showed no sign of abating Friday. Margaret Warner reports on some of the largest protests yet, which came 10 days after President Assad offered a dialogue with the opposition.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2011
  • In Strauss-Kahn Case, All Eyes on Accuser's Statements
    Dominique Strauss-Kahn, former head of the International Monetary Fund, was released from house arrest Friday after a court hearing. Jeffrey Brown discusses the state of the charges Strauss-Kahn still faces with Bloomberg Television's Sara Eisen and Loyola Law School's Laurie Levenson.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2011
  • Strauss-Kahn Released From House Arrest as Case Enters Legal Limbo
    After a court hearing Friday in New York, Dominique Strauss-Kahn, former head of the International Monetary Fund, was released from house arrest, but he still faces charges of sexual assault on a hotel maid. Jeffrey Brown reports on the latest developments in the high-profile case.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2011
  • Eleanor Henderson Reads From Her Novel, 'Ten Thousand Saints'
    Eleanor Henderson reads from her novel, "Ten Thousand Saints."
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2011
  • Conversation: Eleanor Henderson, Author of 'Ten Thousand Saints'
    Jeffrey Brown talks to Eleanor Henderson, author of "Ten Thousand Saints," a novel that's garnering strong reviews for its treatment of teens, an underground youth culture and troubled family relationships.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2011

Thursday, June 30, 2011

  • Daley: U.S. Default 'Will Not Happen'
    White House Chief of Staff Bill Daley speaks with Jeffrey Brown about the state of U.S. deficit and debt talks and President Obama's expressions of frustration with Congress at his Wednesday news conference.
    Original Air Date: June 30, 2011
  • Growing Dissent From Youth, Labor Unions Spark Rare Protests in China
    Growing dissent among young people and labor union members has sparked rare protests in China. Independent Television News' John Sparks reports from the southeastern city of Xintang, which saw four days of protests in recent weeks.
    Original Air Date: June 30, 2011
  • Are Social Media Services the Next Tech Bubble?
    The estimated value of tech companies such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn is soaring, but could another tech bubble be building? Ray Suarez discusses the social media services that are at the center of this question with Fortune magazine's Jessi Hempel and Forrester Research's Josh Bernoff.
    Original Air Date: June 30, 2011
  • Denver Hospital Sets the Bar for Patient Safety
    As many as 96,000 people are estimated to die every year from an infection or a medical mistake after going into the hospital. And almost all of those deaths are preventable. Health correspondent Betty Ann Bowser reports from a Denver hospital that has the lowest mortality rate of any academic medical center in the country.
    Original Air Date: June 30, 2011
  • Governments Push for Austerity, but Can it Really Revive Growth?
    Greek Parliament passed a bill to implement a new austerity plan Thursday, and Britain was in the throes of a national civil servant strike. Margaret Warner discusses whether austerity measures will likely help those countries with MIT's Simon Johnson and Mark Weisbort of the Center of Economic Policy and Research.
    Original Air Date: June 30, 2011
  • What Next for Chinese Artist Ai Weiwei?
    Internationally known Chinese artist Ai Weiwei was released from prison last week after a three month detention. Jeffrey Brown gets an update on Ai's situation from Alison Klayman, who has been working on a documentary about him, "Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry," for the past few years, spending a great deal of time with him in Beijing and around the world.
    Original Air Date: June 30, 2011
  • Colbert Praises FEC Decision on His 'Super PAC'
    Comedian and television show host Stephen Colbert announced after a meeting with the FEC Thursday that the panel had signed off on his bid to form a political action committee and allow him to use the resources of his TV program to boost his "super PAC."
    Original Air Date: June 30, 2011

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

  • News Wrap: Greece Endorses New Austerity Measures Amid More Rioting
    In other news Wednesday, lawmakers in Greece endorsed new austerity measures in the face of chaos in the streets of Athens. The package of $40 billion in spending cuts and tax hikes is designed to win a second bailout from the European Union. Also, Egyptian riot police clashed with demonstrators in Cairo for a second day.
    Original Air Date: June 29, 2011
  • Mythbuster's Savage on Finding the Fun, and the 'Danger,' in Science
    Miles talks to Mythbusters' Adam about the importance of encouraging kids to get their hands dirty and embrace a little danger. Can this movement replace shop class, and play a role in the so-called STEM crisis, we ask him?
    Original Air Date: June 29, 2011
  • Debt Battle Growing More Urgent, but GOP, Democrats Not Budging Yet
    At a White House news conference Wednesday, President Obama insisted that congressional leaders put everything on the table, including spending, benefits programs and tax increases, in order to reach a debt limit deal. Jeffrey Brown discusses ongoing negotiations with Sens. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., and Robert Menendez, D-N.J.
    Original Air Date: June 29, 2011
  • How Making Stuff Helps Make Science More Appealing to Kids
    A California gathering aims to make the "stuff" of science and make learning about it more fun for kids. Miles O'Brien reports.
    Original Air Date: June 29, 2011
  • Brazen Attack on Kabul Hotel Raises New Questions on Afghan Security
    Tuesday night's spectacular Taliban attack on a landmark Kabul hotel shook any semblance of calm in the Afghan capital. Margaret Warner talks to a reporter in Kabul for an update.
    Original Air Date: June 29, 2011
  • 'Haunting Legacy' Details Vietnam War's Hold on Politics
    Judy Woodruff and the authors of "Haunting Legacy" discuss the shadow cast by America's "lost war" on post-war presidents and military leaders.
    Original Air Date: June 29, 2011
  • Obama: Congress Must 'Get it Done' on Debt Limit
    In his first news conference in three months, President Obama addressed the impending Aug. 2 debt limit and questions about military engagement in Libya and Afghanistan.
    Original Air Date: June 29, 2011

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

  • Rioting, General Strike Leave Greece in Standstill Ahead of Austerity Vote
    The streets of Athens, Greece, were filled with fighting Tuesday over prospects of more spending cuts and tax increases. The violence marred a general strike as the Parliament considers new austerity measures intended to fend off a national default. Independent Television News' Jonathan Rugman reports.
    Original Air Date: June 28, 2011
  • Will 'Bionic Bodies' Offer High-Tech Hope to the Disabled?
    State of the art technology is being used to create artificial body parts that could help people with disabilities - but the advancements will have limitations. Miles O'Brien reports.
    Original Air Date: June 28, 2011
  • Roberts Court Begins to Leave Its Legal Mark
    The Supreme Court wrapped up its term this week, completing a year of action in which its conservative majority left a major legal mark. Gwen Ifill gets perspective from two experts.
    Original Air Date: June 28, 2011
  • In the Shadow of Sudan's Split, Concerns Over Reignited Violence
    South Sudan is set to become the world's newest nation, seceding from Sudan. But since that agreement, violence has erupted anew. Margaret Warner talks with the U.S. special envoy for Sudan on the mounting violence.
    Original Air Date: June 28, 2011
  • Lagarde Takes Lead of IMF at Key Moment for Global Economy
    France's Christine Lagarde was named the new head of the International Monetary Fund at a critical time for that organization and for the global economy. Judy Woodruff asks two experts about the challenges ahead.
    Original Air Date: June 28, 2011
  • Sudan Envoy: Southern Kordofan Not Another Darfur
    U.S. envoy for Sudan Princeton Lyman told Margaret Warner this week that the Nuba Mountain region in Southern Kordofan, where Northern forces have entered and many residents have fled, is not in danger of becoming another Darfur.
    Original Air Date: June 28, 2011

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