Monday, September 16, 2013

  • Melting Ice Threatens to Erode Inupiat Way of Life in Alaska
    More than 300 miles north of the Arctic Circle, Alaska’s North Slope is on the frontline of global climate change, warming twice as fast as any other place on earth. For the Inupiat people who live there, rising temperatures mean greater struggles to feed their communities.
    Original Air Date: September 16, 2013

Sunday, September 15, 2013

  • Why is the Middle Class Still Stagnant?
    As corporate and financial sectors rebound, why is the middle class still stagnant? The Guardian's Heidi Moore explains the different elements that went into creating the financial crisis of 2008 and why there has been such a disconnect between the growth of the corporate and financial sectors and the stagnation of the middle class.
    Original Air Date: September 15, 2013
  • Five Years On: Lessons Learned from the Collapse?
    On the fifth anniversary of the collapse of Lehman Brothers, Heidi Moore, The Guardian's US finance and economics editor, speaks with Hari Sreenivasan about what the United States has (or hasn't) done to prevent another financial collapse and how regulations on Wall Street can be improved. Moore said: "There are hundreds of rules that are in Dodd-Frank that were left undone."
    Original Air Date: September 15, 2013
  • Gauging Israeli Reaction to the Syrian Crisis
    Secretary of State Kerry was in Jerusalem today, offering Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu assurances that the United States will insist on full compliance by Bashar Al-Assad's regime. NewsHour Special Correspondent Martin Fletcher reports from Israel on what’s been on the minds of Israelis this week as the crisis over Syria unfolded.
    Original Air Date: September 15, 2013
  • Civil Rights Reflections: A Somber 50th
    Tonight, a few lives remembered from the Civil Rights era. They would have been in their early 60's now — grandmothers, perhaps. Denise McNail, Carol Robertson, Addie May Collins and Cynthia Wesley were killed 50 years ago today in one of the worst acts of violence during the Civil Rights Movement. Also remembered tonight, Demetrius Newton, a Civil Rights attorney and Alabama legislator.
    Original Air Date: September 15, 2013

Saturday, September 14, 2013

  • Will the Syrian Chemical Weapons Deal Work?
    Anthony Cordesman of the Center for Strategic and International Studies joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the deal between the US and Russia on Syria's chemical weapons and what effect the removal of such weapons may have on the Syrian civil war.
    Original Air Date: September 14, 2013
  • Number of Americans Who Self-identify as Poor Doubles
    Gerald Seib, Washington bureau chief for The Wall Street Journal, talks to Hari Sreenivasan about the recent WSJ/NBC News survey showing many Americans continue to worry about making ends meet in the US economy. Among the findings: 26% -- one in four -- said they most worry about paying for their groceries and utility bills.
    Original Air Date: September 14, 2013
  • Gilding the Ages: Edith Wharton's Berkshire Sanctuary
    Edith Wharton’s novels rarely go more than a couple of years without a film or television adaptation. They are certainly never absent from high school and college curricula. Wharton was a taste-maker in other ways -- she wrote popular books on both interior decor and gardening. WGBH visits her Berkshire home, The Mount.
    Original Air Date: September 14, 2013

Friday, September 13, 2013

  • Burning Man Leaves the Desert to Find New Life in Cities
    Burning Man -- once a small, alternative gathering in the Black Rock Desert in Nevada -- has evolved into America's largest arts festival. KQED's Thuy Vu reports on how San Francisco's arts and technology communities have influenced the annual gathering and how their installations are finding new lives beyond the festival.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2013
  • Shields and Brooks on Kerry's Role in Syria Talks
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week's top political news, including U.S. diplomatic efforts on Syria and John Kerry's influence as secretary of state, the lack of leverage for leading lawmakers among their own parties and the 2008 financial collapse.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2013
  • How Latino Americans Shaped the U.S., Fought for Acceptance
    From Spanish settlers to immigration reform, the Hispanic-American experience stretches centuries and predates Plymouth Rock. A new PBS documentary series chronicles those often untold stories. Gwen Ifill talks to NewsHour's own Ray Suarez about his companion book, "Latino Americans: The 500-Year Legacy that Shaped a Nation."
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2013
  • Is There a Future for Political Islam in Egypt?
    It's a dangerous time in Egypt to be associated with the Muslim Brotherhood, as security forces continue their crackdown on pro-Morsi supporters. Margaret Warner reports from Cairo on their dispersed, toned-down protests, the struggle between religion and politics in Egypt and whether the crackdown will inspire more violence.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2013
  • Verifying Syria's Chemical Arsenal Could Be Big Challenge
    The U.S. and Russia delved into the "nitty-gritty" of how to handle Syria's chemical arsenal, nearing a basic diplomatic understanding. Meanwhile, it was reported that forces have been moving weapons around in Syria. Jeffrey Brown talks to Michael Gordon of the New York Times and Julian Barnes of the Wall Street Journal.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2013
  • Coping with Climate Change: Arctic Thaw
    Melting ice in the Arctic is beginning to affect the daily lives of residents of the Pacific Northwest, Alaska and beyond. From the impact on local businesses and native traditions to the seafood we enjoy, the changes caused by climate change in the Arctic are rippling out far beyond the region. The consequences are the subject of a series of reports on PBS NewsHour both on air and online.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2013
  • Coping with Climate Change: Arctic Thaw Preview
    Melting ice in the Arctic is beginning to affect the daily lives of residents of the Pacific Northwest, Alaska and beyond. From the impact on local businesses and native traditions to the seafood we enjoy, the changes caused by climate change in the Arctic are rippling out far beyond the region. The consequences are the subject of a series of reports on PBS NewsHour both on air and online.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2013

Thursday, September 12, 2013

  • Poetry Project Helps Dementia Patients Live in the Moment
    In our new series, "Where Poetry Lives," Natasha Trethewey, poet laureate of the United States, and Jeffrey Brown spends time at the Alzheimer's Poetry Project in Brooklyn. The international program works with people with dementia to try to trigger memory by playfully engaging with language.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2013
  • 9/11's First Victim Kept the Web Afloat Amid Catastrophy
    When the 9/11 attacks occurred, Americans flooded the Internet to seek news and feel connected. Danny Lewin was a tech entrepreneur who had developed algorithms to ensure the Web wouldn't crash from high traffic. He was also the first victim on Sept. 11. Molly Knight-Raskin joins Ray Suarez to discuss her new book about Lewin.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2013
  • What Happens to Traditional TV With New Technology?
    The technology of television is rapidly evolving, but the latest way to watch has raised legal questions about copyright. Aereo is a subscription service that lets viewers stream free-to-air TV live on mobile devices. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with Aereo chief Chet Kanojia about where the medium is headed next.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2013
  • Obamacare Battles in the House as Budget Loom
    As Congress returns to Capitol Hill this week, House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, is in a bind to pass major spending bills before the Oct. 1 fiscal year deadline. Gwen Ifill speaks with Todd Zwillich of Public Radio International about how the battle over Obamacare threatens to shut down the government.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2013
  • What Issues Have Stopped the U.S. and Russia From Agreeing?
    The U.S. and Russia have been at loggerheads for years over Syria. What makes the countries seem more willing to work on a solution together now? Judy Woodruff gets debate from Angela Stent of Georgetown University and Andranik Migranyan of the Institute for Democracy and Cooperation.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2013
  • Natasha Trethewey reads "Why Some People be Mad at Me..."
    Natasha Trethewey engaged the participants in the Alzheimer's Poetry Project and their family and friends at the boat house on the duck pond at Prospect Park. She chose Lucille Clifton's "Why Some People be Mad at Me Sometimes."
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2013
  • Gary Glazner reads "Laughing Time" by William Jay Smith
    Gary Glazner and Natasha Trethewey joined forces at the Alzheimer's Poetry Project to work with children from Ace Preschool which operates upstairs from APP. They recited--and acted out-- William Jay Smith's poem "Laughing Time."
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2013
  • Gary Glazner recites "Daffodils" by William Wordsworth
    Gary Glazner and Natasha Trethewey joined forces at the Alzheimer's Poetry Project to work with children from Ace Preschool which operates upstairs from APP.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2013
  • One ER Doctor’s View of Drunk Driving
    Inside the emergency room at Vancouver General Hospital, Dr. Roy Purssell has for years seen the damage done by drunk driving. As heartbreaking as those tragedies are, Purssell is equally alarmed by how hard it seemed for authorities to deter drunk drivers from getting behind the wheel in the first place. In this web-exclusive video, Purssell describes what he’s up against.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2013
  • Natasha Trethewey reads "Give and Take"
    Coming to grips with what it means to lose one's personal history, Natasha said, was part of her own early exploration in poetry. In Brooklyn's Prospect Park, she read her poem, "Give and Take."
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2013
  • Gary Glazner recites "We Are Forget"
    Gary Glazner has been using poetry to help people since the 1990's when he worked in an adult daycare center in northern California. One day he hit on the idea of using classic poems to engage elderly patients who may have remembered poems they learned as kids. Here, Glazner reads his poem, "We Are Forget" about his experience of working with people with dementia.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2013
  • British Columbia Drunk Driving Deaths Cut Nearly in Half
    Correspondent William Brangham reports on recent changes to drunk-driving laws in British Columbia that have led to a dramatic decrease (roughly 50%) in alcohol-related fatalities over the past two years. BC officials ramped up penalties on drivers who tested at a much lower blood alcohol level (.05, as opposed to the current .08 legal standard) and authorized police to immediately impound cars.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2013
  • Kerry: "We share hopes for a political solution"
    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and his team opened two days of meetings with their Russian counterparts, including Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov Thursday, hoping to emerge with the outlines of a plan for the complex task of safely securing and destroying vast stockpiles of Syrian chemical weapons in the midst of a brutal and unpredictable conflict.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2013

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