Thursday, October 11, 2012

  • For Mo Yan, the Politics of Being a Chinese Literary Figure
    Jeffrey Brown talks to Charles Laughlin of the University of Virginia and Xiao Qiang at the University of California, Berkeley about prolific writer and Nobel Laureate Mo Yan, whose detractors cite a cozy relationship with Chinese state media and a savviness about staying away from topics sensitive to the Communist government.
    Original Air Date: October 11, 2012
  • Poet Sharon Olds Mourns and Heals the End of a Marriage
    Sharon Olds shares work from her latest collection of poetry, "Stag's Leap," a book grieving and healing at the end of a marriage. Olds also talks about her partner's New Hampshire nature retreat where she spends her days, about finding her poetic voice in her 30s, and the "usefulness" of poetry.
    Original Air Date: October 11, 2012
  • Demand for Ivory Explodes in Asia Despite Ban
    Despite a 1990 global treaty illegalizing the sale of elephant tusks, religious faiths across Asia value ivory and are willing to pay for it. In China, demand has been met with the construction of major factories to process and produce religious icons. Hari Sreenivasan talks to National Geographic reporter Bryan Christy.
    Original Air Date: October 11, 2012
  • Medicare is Battle Cries for Tight House Races in Fla., N.Y.
    In our new Battleground Dispatches series, Todd Zwillich of Public Radio International's "The Takeway" reports from Florida and New York, where Medicare is not only a hot topic in the general election, but crucial to clinching some close congressional races.
    Original Air Date: October 11, 2012
  • Turkey's Plane Incident Shows Crackdown on Assad Regime
    In stopping the Syrian plane and confiscating military equipment onboard, Turkey sent a message not only to Syria, but also to Moscow, whose government has blocked international efforts to encourage Syrian political transition. Margaret Warner talks to Soner Cagaptay of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.
    Original Air Date: October 11, 2012
  • Shields, Brooks Predict Ryan to Show Bipartisanship
    While the Romney-Ryan ticket gained momentum in the last debate, Obama-Biden still has a narrow lead. The pressure is now on Rep. Paul Ryan and Vice President Joe Biden as they go head-to-head in the 2012 VP debate. Judy Woodruff talks to NewsHour political analysts Mark Shields and David Brooks about what to expect.
    Original Air Date: October 11, 2012
  • Political Checklist: Vice Presidential Debate Night
    NewsHour Political Editor Christina Bellantoni sat down with Senior Correspondent Judy Woodruff as part of the continuing PBS NewsHour livestream coverage of the 2012 Vice Presidential Debate. Christina and Judy talk expectations from Vice President Joe Biden and Congressman Paul Ryan in the wake of the first presidential debate as well as preview the night's coverage.
    Original Air Date: October 11, 2012
  • Ad Libs: Run for President by Creating Your Own Political Ad
    Create your own political ad promoting or attacking your own bid for President with Ad Libs, an effort by PBS NewsHour and Mozilla to showcase what tactics and imagery plays into the advertisements you see on TV.
    Original Air Date: October 11, 2012

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

  • Science of Superheroes
    Could Spider-Man really suspend a car from the Williamsburg bridge? How would Batman's cape-turned-hang glider work? We asked physics professor Jim Kakalios for the answers.
    Original Air Date: October 10, 2012
    October 10, 2012
  • Report Depicts Lance Armstrong as Ring Leader of Doping Ring
    In a report by the USADA, cyclist Lance Armstrong is characterized as leader of a sophisticated team doping operation. The first established paper trail documenting allegations and evidence against him includes testimony of teammates and big payments made by wire. Ray Suarez talks to Bill Strickland of Bicycling magazine.
    Original Air Date: October 10, 2012
  • Pakastanis Protest in Support of Yousafzai
    While some Pakastanis protested and military leaders condemned the attack on the teenage activist, many conservative religious figures were conspicuously silent. Judy Woodruff talks to NewsHour special correspondent Saima Mohsin from Islamabad about the way average citizens have stood up in anger against the extremist actions.
    Original Air Date: October 10, 2012
  • As Goes Jefferson County so Goes Colo.? Candidates Make Case
    Jefferson County, Colo., is comprised of one-third Democrats, one-third Republicans, and those who have yet to decide whether they will vote for Mitt Romney or President Obama. As one of the most populous purple counties in Colorado, both candidates have become repeat visitors, hoping to swing some votes. Gwen Ifill reports.
    Original Air Date: October 10, 2012
  • Supreme Court Hears Affirmative Action Challenges
    The U.S. Supreme Court took up a case on whether race should be considered in college applications. Gwen Ifill talks to National Law Journal's Marcia Coyle who explains the arguments. Ray Suarez talks to NAACP's Debo Adegbile and the Century Foundation's Richard Kahlenberg about potential implications for public institutions.
    Original Air Date: October 10, 2012
  • Poet Sharon Olds Reads From Her Book 'Stag's Leap'
    Sharon Olds is one of the country's best-selling poets. We recently visited her in New Hampshire where she read from her most recent book, "Stag's Leap."
    Original Air Date: October 10, 2012
  • Urban Designer on Making Greener Cities
    Hari Sreenivasan spoke with urban designer Peter Calthorpe about how cities will have to change their transportation and city vegetation in order to adapt to changing climate conditions.
    Original Air Date: October 10, 2012

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

  • Targeting Cartel Leaders Is Key to Mexico's Drug War Offense
    For Mexican President Felipe Calderon, the fall of Herbito Lazcano is part of a larger strategy to injure drug cartels' operations by targeting their leaders. Judy Woodruff talks to Reuters News Agency's Simon Gardner for more on how this success plays into the larger goals for curbing drug-related violence in Mexico.
    Original Air Date: October 9, 2012
  • Chicago Fights Extreme Urban Heat With Greener Ideas
    One of Chicago's most beautiful and hidden gardens is located on top of City Hall, part of an effort to 'green' roofs in order fight rising temperatures. Hari Sreenivasan reports on the actions the city of Chicago is taking to mitigate climate change in an urban landscape.
    Original Air Date: October 9, 2012
  • Romney Cuts into Obama's Lead, Both Vie for Swing States
    After the first presidential debate the tides were turned for Mitt Romney, who had been trailing President Obama. In almost every post-debate poll Romney is now statistically tied or leading President Obama. Gwen Ifill reports on the candidates' messages on campaign trail post-debate, especially in swing states.
    Original Air Date: October 9, 2012
  • Opposing Views on Congress' Claims Huawei Technologies
    Jeffrey Brown discusses the House Intelligence Committee's report with Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger, D-Md., which suggests Chinese telecoms pose a national security threat. Then Brown talks to Huawei Technologies spokesman William Plummer who refutes any claims of an inappropriate relationship between Huawei and China's government.
    Original Air Date: October 9, 2012
  • Chinese Tech Companies in U.S. Potentially Stealing, Spying
    Two of the largest telecom companies in the world are looking to expand to the U.S. market. But the House Intelligence Committee has charged that Huawei and ZTE have ties to the Chinese government and run a potential cyber-security risk, recommending their products and services should be avoided. Jeffrey Brown reports.
    Original Air Date: October 9, 2012
  • News Wrap: Activist for Girls Education, 14, Shot by Taliban
    Girls' education activist Malala Yousufzai was shot in the head and the neck by an unknown gunman. After the attack, the Taliban claimed responsibility, saying that the 14-year-old's work promoting schooling for girls was "an obscenity."
    Original Air Date: October 9, 2012
  • Jerry Sandusky Receives 30 to 60 Years Behind Bars
    Three months after being convicted of 45 counts of sexual abuse, former Penn State football coach Jerry Sandusky appeared in court to receive a sentence of 30 to 60 years in prison. Judy Woodruff talks with The Associated Press' Mark Scolforo for more on the reactions from Sandusky and his victims after the sentence was read.
    Original Air Date: October 9, 2012

Monday, October 8, 2012

  • Gallup Poll to Show Romney-Obama Ties Among Likely Voters
    Former Gov. Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama are virtually tied among likely voters, a new Gallup daily tracking poll will show, according to USA Today's Washington Bureau Chief Susan Page.
    Original Air Date: October 8, 2012
  • Salman Rushdie Writes Novelistically About His Own Life
    In his new memoir, Salman Rushdie recounts, in the third person, his upbringing as a secular muslim trying to understand his religion, as well as living under fatwa, a period when he says he discovered his own resilience. Jeffrey Brown talks to the author about recent clashes over free speech and Islamic ideology.
    Original Air Date: October 8, 2012
  • Romney-Obama Race Tightens Up, Raising Stakes for VP Debate
    Margaret Warner talks to the Rothenberg Political Report's Stu Rothenberg, USA Today's Susan Page and Pew Research Center's Andy Kohut about the latest election polls coming out of the first presidential debate, and what that means for the stakes in this week's vice presidential debate.
    Original Air Date: October 8, 2012
  • Stem Cell Scientists Win Nobel Prize in Medicine
    England's Sir John Gurdon and Dr. Shinya Yamanaka from Japan share the 2012 Nobel Prize in medicine for work on stem cells, revealing that mature cells can be reverted into primitive cells. Ray Suarez talks to Harvard Stem Cell Institute's Dr. David Scadden, who explains the implications and applications for stem cell medicine.
    Original Air Date: October 8, 2012
  • Tainted Steroid Drugs Caused Deadly Meningitis Outbreak
    More than 100 cases of a rare form of meningitis have been traced to a tainted batch of steroid injections. Jeffrey Brown talks to Dr. John Jernigan of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for more on the investigation, and to Boston University's Kevin Outterson on the difficulties for the FDA to prevent outbreaks.
    Original Air Date: October 8, 2012
  • News Wrap: Security Factors in Libya Embassy Attack
    In other news Monday, the investigation of terrorist attacks on the U.S. Consulate continues, with media reports surfacing that the State Department rejected requests for more security personnel made by American officials in Libya. Deputy National Security Advisor John Brennan will visit Libya to review the inquiry.
    Original Air Date: October 8, 2012

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