Thursday, November 14, 2013

  • Obama asks Congress not to step up pressure on Iran
    President Obama urged Congress to hold off on imposing new sanctions on Iran while negotiations over that nation's nuclear program are in progress. Margaret Warner joins Gwen Ifill to offer insight on the factors influencing lawmakers, including distrust of Iran, worries about maintaining leverage and pressure from Israel.
    Original Air Date: November 14, 2013
  • ATF head Jones reflects on agency's outdated technology
    As the new director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, B. Todd Jones has the "tall task" of keeping track of America's 300 million guns. Judy Woodruff interviews Jones about the challenges his agency faces in reigning in gun-related violence and keeping up with new technologies despite limited resources.
    Original Air Date: November 14, 2013
  • House members debate Obama's proposed fix to insurance
    President Obama's idea to temporarily lessen the blow for Americans whose existing insurance policies were canceled has garnered mixed reviews on Capitol Hill. Gwen Ifill gets reaction from Rep. Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill., and Rep. James Lankford, R-Okla.
    Original Air Date: November 14, 2013
  • Obama to allow Americans to extend canceled health plans
    President Obama made a move to keep his promise and put out a political firestorm by allowing people to keep their recently canceled health care plans for at least one year. His response came after millions of Americans received cancellation notices for existing insurance policies that were not compliant with the ACA.
    Original Air Date: November 14, 2013
  • ATF Director says agency inhibited by fear mongering
    The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms Director B. Todd Jones says that the agency is committed to its core aim: regulating the legal commerce of firearms and working to enforce the Gun Control Act. But, he admits, the agency is hindered by outside pressure that the organization would overstep and create anything resembling a national gun registry.
    Original Air Date: November 14, 2013
  • Creating the flipped 'lecture' for at-home use
    Andy Kastl, a social studies teacher at Clintondale High School in suburban Detroit, explains how he creates video lectures that his students watch at home or on their mobile device. Clintondale was the nation's first 'flipped school' where 'homework' is done in class with the teacher acting as facilitator and lectures viewed at home.
    Original Air Date: November 14, 2013

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

  • How the Iran nuclear talks affect Israel's confidence
    To assess how the Iran nuclear negotiations are affecting the relationship between Israel and the U.S. and the American role in mediating Israeli-Palestinian peace talks, Jeffrey Brown talks to Robert Satloff of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy and Hussein Ibish of the American Task Force on Palestine.
    Original Air Date: November 13, 2013
  • Heart experts recommend wider statin drug use
    Leading heart organizations issued new recommendations for the way doctors prescribe cholesterol-lowering statin drugs. Hari Sreenivasan talks to Dr. Harlan Krumholz of Yale School of Medicine about how a new risk calculator could help doctors shift their focus from lab results to more holistic thinking about who might benefit.
    Original Air Date: November 13, 2013
  • What a 'Flipped' Classroom Looks Like
    Clintondale High, just outside of Detroit, is the nation’s first completely flipped school, meaning teachers record lectures for students to watch online outside of class; and what was once considered homework is now done in class, allowing students to work through assignments together and ask teachers for help if they run into questions.
    Original Air Date: November 13, 2013
  • Sick find solace in pre-existing conditions guarantee
    After Martha Monsson was diagnosed with cancer, her husband lost his job and their health care. In our series of personal stories about the effects of health reform, Monsson voices support for the law's guarantee of care for those with pre-existing conditions. Mary Agnes Carey of Kaiser Health News joins Judy Woodruff for more.
    Original Air Date: November 13, 2013
  • Astronaut Chris Hadfield answers your questions
    Astronaut Chris Hadfield became a celebrity when he covered “Space Oddity” on the International Space Station. The video went viral with more than 18 million views. He sat down with Miles O’Brien to answer your burning questions from Twitter.
    Original Air Date: November 13, 2013
  • ACA enrollment 'more of a marathon than a sprint'
    Technology chiefs in charge of HealthCare.gov were grilled by lawmakers on Capitol Hill about the problematic rollout of the website. Kwame Holman reports on their testimony, while Judy Woodruff talks to Mary Agnes Carey of Kaiser Health News about the lower-than-expected enrollment numbers for the insurances exchanges.
    Original Air Date: November 13, 2013
  • Debris continues to be obstacle to typhoon relief efforts
    Relief supplies have been slow to reach typhoon victims due to physical obstacles slowing down delivery. The lack of aid and growing desperation have led to a "breakdown of peace and order" in the hardest hit regions. Gwen Ifill talks to Richard Gordon of the Philippine Red Cross about the challenges.
    Original Air Date: November 13, 2013
  • President Obama addresses tribal leaders as D.C. conference
    American Indian leaders from 566 federally recognized tribes joined President Barack Obama and other Cabinet members Wednesday for the fifth annual Tribal Nations Conference at the White House.
    Original Air Date: November 13, 2013

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

  • Dick Cheney reflects on how medical care kept him active
    From his first heart attack at age 37 to a full transplant in 2012, Dick Cheney says he's proud to have lived an active life despite battling heart disease. Gwen Ifill sits down with the former vice president, author of "Heart: An American Medical Odyssey," to discuss how his health concerns affected his time in office.
    Original Air Date: November 12, 2013
  • Did 60 Minutes do enough after false Benghazi report?
    News program 60 Minutes admitted it made a mistake in a segment about the U.S. consulate attack in Benghazi, which included false reports by a supposed eyewitness. Kelly McBride of the Poynter Institute and Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute join Jeffrey Brown to critique the reporting and response.
    Original Air Date: November 12, 2013
  • Understanding why insurance plans are being canceled
    Despite being happy with her health care plan, Deborah Persico of Washington, D.C., received notice that her insurance policy was being canceled. To understand why Persico and millions of other Americans' coverage didn't qualify under the Affordable Care Act, Judy Woodruff speaks with Mary Agnes Carey of Kaiser Health News.
    Original Air Date: November 12, 2013
  • Why the strongest storms are getting stronger
    The sheer deadly power of the Philippines typhoon has cast a fresh spotlight on the question, are storms getting stronger as the planet gets warmer? To examine the science of super storms, Gwen Ifill talks to Kevin Trenberth of the National Center for Atmospheric Research and Jeff Masters of Weather Underground.
    Original Air Date: November 12, 2013

Monday, November 11, 2013

  • Catton finds harmony in novel's mix of mystery and astrology
    Eleanor Catton, 28, called her novel a "publisher's nightmare" for its length and complexity, but the fun she had writing it has paid off. "The Luminaries" won Catton the Man Booker Prize, making her that award's youngest winner ever. Jeffrey Brown talks to the writer about her "astrological dance" of a murder mystery.
    Original Air Date: November 11, 2013
  • Veterans going back to school find specialized support
    More than a million veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars have used the GI bill to pursue college, but combat injuries and stress can add challenge to the transition to student life. At City College of San Francisco, a VA clinic is on-campus to support student vets and their needs. Special correspondent Aaron Glantz reports.
    Original Air Date: November 11, 2013
  • Convincing 'young invincibles' to sign up for coverage
    Experts have said the success of the Affordable Care Act depends on Americans aged 18-34 to sign up. Often referred to as the "young invincibles," this pivotal, generally healthy demographic must weigh the options of signing up for coverage or paying the fine. Frederica Freyberg of Wisconsin Public Television reports.
    Original Air Date: November 11, 2013
  • Why did the Iran talks fall apart despite signs of hope?
    Talks to negotiate Iran's nuclear program stalled over the weekend when world powers failed to strike an interim agreement. Gwen Ifill talks to chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner about whether hope for a deal is dead or alive and next goals for Secretary of State John Kerry.
    Original Air Date: November 11, 2013
  • Philippines relief has faced 'one blow after another'
    Typhoon Haiyan is the Philippines' fifth natural disaster in a single year, only adding to the relief challenges facing that nation. For insight on why relief efforts appear to be delayed and how Americans can help, Judy Woodruff speaks to Andrew Natsios, former director at the U.S. Agency for International Development.
    Original Air Date: November 11, 2013
  • Eleanor Catton reads from 'The Luminaries'
    Eleanor Catton, the youngest author to win the Man Booker Prize, reads from her novel, "The Luminaries," which was awarded the prize in 2013 and is longest book ever to do so.
    Original Air Date: November 11, 2013

Sunday, November 10, 2013

  • NewsHour Student Reporting Labs: Military children
    On Veterans Day, most Americans think of the men and women in uniform. But military life also has a huge effect on their children. The PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs network reached out to students living in Bahrain. To find out how their parents' military careers have affected their lives.
    Original Air Date: November 10, 2013
  • Chinese party leaders consider major economic reforms
    China is now the world’s second largest economy. So what happens there, naturally, has great implications for the rest of the world. There’s a very important meeting going on now in Beijing involving the top leaders of the ruling Communist Party that is expected to produce major economic reforms. For more, we are joined by Elizabeth Economy of the Council on Foreign Relations.
    Original Air Date: November 10, 2013
  • Justin Fox on “why retirement risks are best shared”
    Justin Fox, the Executive Editor of the Harvard Business Review Group and author of The Myth of the Rational Market has studied the Dutch pension system extensively. He discusses what aspects of the system -- mandatory savings -- annuitized payments -- national pools -- might work in the U. S.
    Original Air Date: November 10, 2013
  • Voice Tunnel
    A short video about artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s “Voice Tunnel” installation, which took over a tunnel in midtown Manhattan for a few days, put up hundreds of speakers and lights, and then invited people in to record personal audio messages for their fellow New Yorkers to hear.
    Original Air Date: November 10, 2013
    November 10, 2013

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