Monday, September 17, 2012

  • Skeptic No Longer Doubts Human Role in Global Warming
    Physicist Richard Muller was one of the scientists who denied climate change and humans' role warming the earth. But after spending years researching and analyzing countless studies, Muller concluded climate change scientists were right, that humans had contributed to the rise in the earth's temperature. Spencer Michels reports.
    Original Air Date: September 17, 2012
  • Poll Numbers Sliding, Romney Plans to Offer Policy Specifics
    In an effort to combat sliding poll numbers, the Romney Campaign announced that Mitt Romney would address voters' hunger for specificity, planning to give more detail on parts of his policy platform. Gwen Ifill talks to USA Today's Susan Page and the Washington Post's Dan Balz on whether this strategy shift can win over voters.
    Original Air Date: September 17, 2012
  • News Wrap: Chinese Protests over Japan's Islands Acquisition
    In other news Monday, Chinese protesters aggressively clashed with police and Japanese businesses and citizens, after news broke the Japanese government had purchased long-disputed islands located northeast of Taiwan. There are rumors that large oil and natural gas deposits are located in waters nearby the uninhabited islands.
    Original Air Date: September 17, 2012
  • Surge of 'Green on Blue' Attacks Has Great Cost for U.S.
    While the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan is on the horizon, the death toll for foreign troops rises. Taliban fighters launched attacks on a U.S. military base and some Afghan troops turned their weapons on U.S. and NATO allies. Judy Woodruff talks to Ret. Lt. Gen. John Nagl and Johns Hopkins University's Vali Nasr for more.
    Original Air Date: September 17, 2012
  • Former Justice Souter on Whether Our Democracy Can Endure
    Margaret Warner sat down with former Supreme Court Justice David Souter, who spoke about the future of democracy in the United States and the work that he believes needs to be done and the problem of non-compromise.
    Original Air Date: September 17, 2012
  • Former Justice David Souter on Health Care Reform Law
    Margaret Warner sat down with former Supreme Court Justice David Souter, who carefully opined about one aspect of the recent Supreme Court decision concerning the controversial Affordable Care Act.
    Original Air Date: September 17, 2012
  • Former Justice Souter on 'Pervasive Civic Ignorance'
    Former Supreme Court Justice David Souter sat down with Margaret Warner and answered an audience question concerning the appropriate role of schools to produce civicly engaged students.
    Original Air Date: September 17, 2012
  • Former Justice Souter on Citizens United Decision
    Former Supreme Court Justice David Souter sat down with Margaret Warner, speaking about how there are some laws that Congress can make that can limit the freedom of speech, and addressed the controversial Citizens United decision.
    Original Air Date: September 17, 2012
  • Giant Panda at Smithsonian National Zoo Gives Birth
    video from the national zoo panda cam of the Mei Xiang giving birth to a cub at 10:46 pm ET Sunday Sept 16.
    Original Air Date: September 17, 2012
  • Weekly Poem by U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey
    U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey reads "Elegy," a poem from her new book "Thrall."
    Original Air Date: September 17, 2012

Friday, September 14, 2012

  • Data Mining Creating a Revolution for Campaign Strategy
    Increasingly, behavior psychology concepts like 'social pressure' can be used not only to get voters out to the polls but getting them to vote for a specific candidate. Hari Sreenivasan talks to journalist Sasha Issenberg about his latest book, "The Victory Lab: The Secret Science of Winning Campaigns.
    Original Air Date: September 14, 2012
  • Post-Convention Politics, Foreign Affairs, and Fed's QE3
    New York Times' David Brooks and the Washington Post's Ruth Marcus discuss the week's top political news including the latest election polls, which show an overwhelming majority of voters have already decided their vote, plus analysis on Mitt Romney's critique of U.S. response to attacks in Libya and Fed's recent stimulus plan.
    Original Air Date: September 14, 2012
  • Four Years After Bailouts, Banks Have Bounced Back
    After the fall of Lehman Brothers in 2008, Congress passed the Troubled Asset Relief Program, disbursing money to hundreds of banks, including AIG. Ray Suarez talks to University of Michigan's Michael Barr and Better Markets' Dennis Kelleher on whether the bailouts resulted in financial reform or banks are still too big to fail.
    Original Air Date: September 14, 2012
  • The Nature of Muslim Protests and the Police Response
    Jeffrey Brown talks to McClatchy Newspaper's Nancy Youssef, who explains the nature of the Muslim protests and police response throughout Middle East and Africa. Then, International Crisis Group's Robert Malley argues the protests and disorder are larger signs of the economic and security vacuum created by the Arab Spring.
    Original Air Date: September 14, 2012
  • Why the Global Warming Crowd Oversells Its Message
    Spencer Michels talks to climate skeptic Anthony Watts who runs the popular blog "Watts Up With That?" about why he doesn't believe the data used to analyze climate change.
    Original Air Date: September 14, 2012

Thursday, September 13, 2012

  • Judy Woodruff Talks to Charles Scoville About Public Service
    Judy Woodruff sat down with Chuck Scoville, a doctor of physical therapy, who runs the clinic at Walter Reed Army Hospital and was recently honored as one of the best public servants in the federal government.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2012
  • For Campaigns, Online Outreach on Libya Attacks, Conventions
    Margaret Warner talks to Daily Download's Lauren Ashburn and Howard Kurtz for the social media wrap on Mitt Romney's criticism of President Obama and the White House's response to the attacks on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi. Plus, a recap on the campaigns' social media usage during the Democratic and Republican conventions.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2012
  • Microlending Makes Jump to Developed World
    When Grameen Bank founder Muhammad Yunus won the Nobel Peace Prize for microlending in Bangladesh, he wanted to prove that the concept could work in the developed world. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on efforts to give microloans to Americans attempting to become new entrepreneurs and small business owners.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2012
  • Witnessing a Battle of Ideas in the Arab World
    As a fledgling democracy, Libya faces many challenges, including maintaining sensitivity to religious factions who find themselves at odds with the ruling elite. Jeff Brown talks to Carnegie Endowment for International Peace's Marwan Muasher, Philadelphia Inquirer's Trudy Rubin and Al-Arabiya News' Hisham Melhem for more.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2012
  • Fed Takes Aggressive Stimulus Action to Move Economy Forward
    Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke announced the Fed's third attempt to stimulate the economy by buying up mortgage-backed securities and bonds and keep borrowing rates low. Judy Woodruff talks to David Wessel, economics editor for The Wall Street Journal, to understand why the Fed chose this course of action.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2012
  • News Wrap: Romney Criticizes Obama on Foreign Affairs
    In other news Thursday, Mitt Romney broadened his critique of the White House's response to attacks on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi and took aim at President Obama's foreign affairs record. President Obama responded by vowing to always defend American citizens and interests.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2012
  • How an Anti-Muslim Video Has Arab Muslims Riled
    Judy Woodruff talks to McClatchy Newspapers' Nancy Youssef for a detailed account of the attacks on a U.S. Consulate in Libya and to freelance journalist Bel Trew who reports on Cairo protests. Then, Jeff Brown talks to Los Angeles Times' Rebecca Keegan for more on the anti-Muslim film has sparked violence across Muslim world.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2012
  • Fed Launches Third Attempt to Stimulate Economy
    Noting continued weakness of the overall U.S. economy, the Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke announced Thursday it would launch a third round of so-called quantitative easing, or QE3 -- an aggressive bond-buying program designed to lower long-term interest rates and in effect, stimulate the economy.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2012

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

  • Parsing the Census Numbers on Income, Poverty and Insurance
    Newly released census data paints a mixed picture of America's economy. The poverty rate remained stagnant. Wage gains have fallen below the level of inflation. And income inequality is at its highest in decades. Margaret Warner talks to New York Times' David Leonhardt to parse the numbers on income, poverty, and health care.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2012
  • Forests in Oregon at Risk from Timber Industry and Chemicals
    With 30 million acres of forestland, Oregon has a lucrative timber industry that makes $13 billion each year. But some residents are worried about health and environmental risks posed by a common practice to increase tree growth: chemical spraying. Correspondent Ingrid Lobet reports for the Center for Investigative Reporting.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2012
  • Apple Unveils iPhone5 Amid Competitive Smartphone Market
    Though Apple remains a giant in the smartphone and tablet industry, the company unveils the new iPhone5 in a fiercely competitive market. Jeffrey Brown talks to the Washington Post's Cecilia Kang and Forrester Research's Charles Golvin about the challenges Apple faces to stay at the top of the pyramid in the tech world.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2012
  • Campaigns Get Combative Over Embassy Attacks
    The two major presidential candidates responded to news of attacks on the U.S. Embassy in Libya, emphasizing their foreign policy differences in the process. Judy Woodruff talks to former Minnesota senator Norm Coleman and former ambassador to NATO Nicholas Burns about the campaigns' responses.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2012
  • News Wrap: Factory Fires in Pakistan Claim Hundreds of Lives
    In other news Wednesday, two fires at factories in Pakistan claimed the lives of more that 300 workers. The buildings, one a garment factory in Karachi and the other a shoe factory in Lahore, had no emergency exits or basic safety equipment, and all but one door were locked.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2012

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