Monday, April 15, 2013

  • Spectators, Runners Disperse After Deadly Boston Blasts
    After two devices were detonated near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, tens of thousands of runners and spectators had to be diverted from the disaster, many leaving behind bags or luggage to speed their retreat. Gwen Ifill talks to Scott Malone of Reuters about the scene at the blast.
    Original Air Date: April 15, 2013
  • Eyewitness Account of Boston Marathon Bombings
    PBS NewsHour's Noreen Nasir spoke to Hari Sreenivasan by phone from the site of the Boston Marathon, where two bombs went off earlier this afternoon near the finish line.
    Original Air Date: April 15, 2013
  • Boston Police Commissioner: "This Is An Ongoing Event"
    In a press conference Monday afternoon, Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis confirmed a third incident at JFK Library. Davis said that Boston Police were treating the event as related to the marathon. The commissioner also urged the public to avoid congregating in crowds, explaining that "this is an ongoing event."
    Original Air Date: April 15, 2013
  • Boston Press Conference on Marathon Explosions
    The mayor of Boston and other officials updated the latest information on the Boston Marathon explosions early evening Monday.
    Original Air Date: April 15, 2013
  • Flash Mob Uses Chalk as Weapon Against Gun Violence
    Artists and activists gathered at the Lincoln Memorial for a flash mob. Their goal: to protest against gun violence. Their performance captured attention from tourists and passersby as the demonstrators traced each others’ bodies with chalk, and then wrote names, dates and words associated with victims of gun violence.
    Original Air Date: April 15, 2013
  • The Evolving Immigration Debate: Border Security
    Hari Sreenivasan spoke with Shawn Moran, the vice president of the Border Patrol Council, and asked him what has changed in the past seven years. Moran says that although he does see "more of a visibility" of border security today compared to 2006, he is still concerned. "It's safer than it has been in the last two to three decades, but by no means is it secure."
    Original Air Date: April 15, 2013

Friday, April 12, 2013

  • Comic Legend Jonathan Winters Dies at 87
    Pioneering comic Jonathan Winters brought his own brand of wild, improvisational stand-up to television in the 1950s, and continued to perform for nearly five decades. Winters died Thursday at the age of 87. Jeffrey Brown remembers the comedian with a look back at his career and an interview excerpt with JIm Lehrer from 1999.
    Original Air Date: April 12, 2013
  • Shields, Brooks Debate McConnell's 'Watergate,' NCAA Winner
    Mark Shields and David Brooks pondered political sex scandals in the Doubleheader Friday. If it's in the name of love, is it less offensive? In the "sport of politics" section, they talk Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell's comparison of an eavesdropping scandal to Watergate, and in the "politics of sport" section will Mark pay up for picking Syracuse last week in the NCAA tournament?
    Original Air Date: April 12, 2013
  • Shields and Brooks on Obama's Budget, Senate Gun Fight
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks discuss development in the gun legislation battle and if background checks will amount to substantive gun control, plus backlash against President Barack Obama's budget, bipartisan efforts on an immigration bill and the legacy of Margaret Thatcher.
    Original Air Date: April 12, 2013
  • Online TV Service Tests Traditional Broadcast Networks
    Internet television service Aereo uses free signals from local stations and streams content online for a small fee. But several traditional broadcast companies, including PBS, Fox and CBS, have sued Aereo over copyright violations. Hari Sreenivasan discusses the details with The Washington Post's Cecilia Kang.
    Original Air Date: April 12, 2013
  • In Simplifying Tax Code, Getting Back to Fundamental Values?
    With tax day looming, tax reform is in the air. In his budget, President Obama introduced several proposals aimed at simplifying the tax code. David Cay Johnson, columnist for Tax Analysts magazine, and economist Douglas Holtz-Eakin join Jeffrey Brown to discuss different strategies and whether real tax reform is possible.
    Original Air Date: April 12, 2013
  • Approaching Elections in Venezuela Cause Fear of Violence
    Venezuelans will soon go to the polls to pick a replacement for the late former president, Hugo Chavez. Judy Woodruff reports on the ugly contest between the acting president, Nicolas Maduro, and opposition candidate Henrique Capriles, and how the election results will shape Venezuela's future and impact the U.S.
    Original Air Date: April 12, 2013
  • Implications of Hostile Action From North Korea
    Simmering tensions between the Koreas raises concerns of what will come next. Margaret Warner talks with Patrick Cronin of Center for a New American Security and retired Marine Lt. Gen. Chip Gregson Jr., a former assistant secretary of defense, about past conflicts with North Korea and how the U.S. might respond in the future.
    Original Air Date: April 12, 2013
  • Jim Lehrer Interviews Comedian Jonathan Winters
    Jim Lehrer talks to comedian Jonathan Winters, the 1999 winner of the Mark Twain Prize from the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. This interview originally aired Oct. 21, 1999. Winters died April 11, 2013, at age 87.
    Original Air Date: April 12, 2013
  • How Is the Sequester Affecting the Arts?
    Jeffrey Brown talks to Robert Lynch, president and CEO of American for the Arts, about the effects of the sequester on the arts.
    Original Air Date: April 12, 2013

Thursday, April 11, 2013

  • Korean War Army Chaplain Awarded Medal of Honor
    Army chaplain and Catholic priest Father Emil Kapaun received the military's highest honor, the Medal of Honor, 60 years after he died as a prisoner during the Korean War. Kapaun took care of wounded soldiers even though it compromised his own safety. Jeffrey Brown has more on Kapaun and an excerpt from the White House ceremony.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2013
  • Disputing Disclosure of Study Risks for Premature Infants
    Two dozen hospitals are under fire for allegedly not disclosing the risks of participating in a clinical study, which involved 1,300 premature infants. The study was to determine proper supplemental oxygen levels, and risks to the infants included death and blindness. Judy Woodruff talks to David Brown of The Washington Post.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2013
  • Book Traces History and Decline of Political Power
    Moises Naim's new book, "The End of Power," aims to track the history of political power and answer why being in charge isn't what it used to be. Ray Suarez talks with Naim, also a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, about why power is both harder to use and to keep today.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2013
  • Can We Trust Increases in High School Graduation Rates?
    Special correspondent for education John Merrow reports on what accounts for a national rise in high school graduation rates and why the increase has raised some questions about inflation in how schools report their data. He also explores new tactics educators are using to inspire students to succeed.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2013
  • How Will Obama's Budget Impact Medicare, Social Security?
    The president's proposed budget includes cuts to Medicare and Social Security. Jeffrey Brown discusses the various impacts with Joseph Antos of the American Enterprise Institute, Max Richtman of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare and Jared Bernstein of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2013
  • News Wrap: Senators Work on Immigration Reform Bill
    In other news Thursday, a bipartisan group of senators wrapped up work on the major elements of an immigration reform bill. Also, Honda, Toyota, and Nissan announced a recall of more than 3 million vehicles due to air bag problems.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2013
  • Senate Blocks Attempt to Prevent Debate on Gun Legislation
    While families of Newtown shooting victims looking on, Congress moved closer to coming up with a comprehensive bill for reducing gun violence. The Senate blocked an attempt to prevent debate on the subject. Judy Woodruff reports on what measures the bill may include.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2013
  • Web Extra: Moises Naim on North Korea's Leader
    Author Moises Naim talks about his book "The End of Power" and the challenges people like North Korean leader Kim Jong un faces in this online-only portion of Ray Suarez's interview.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2013

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

  • Cuban Dissident Reflects on Freedom and Oppression
    Blogger Yoani Sanchez, called the most famous Cuban not named Castro, writes about freedom, oppression and life as a dissident in her home country. In this interview from WNET's MetroFocus, Sanchez talks with Rafael Pi Roman about how her country has suffered, and whether the government is being transformed or weakened.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2013
  • Lauder's Collection of Cubist Masterpieces Bound for Met
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art is the recipient of a "transformative" collection of Cubist works by the likes of Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque and others. The donation, worth more than $1 billion, was made by Leonard Lauder, philanthropist and former chairman of Estée Lauder. Margaret Warner talks to the Met's Rebecca Rabinow.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2013
  • At Rikers Island, Investing in Lessons for Teens in Trouble
    Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports on efforts to keep young people from returning to New York's Rikers Island once they've served their time. A privately financed pubic program utilizes evidence-based behavioral therapy to imbue teens with a sense of greater control over their lives and decisions.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2013
  • Gun Control Proposal Includes Expanded Background Checks
    Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., and Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., outlined a bipartisan deal on gun background checks. Judy Woodruff talks to Paul Barrett, author of "Glock: The Rise of America's Gun," and Delbert McFadden of the Columbia Heights/Shaw Family Support Collaborative about the impact of gun violence on inner city communities.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2013
  • Obama Budget Plan With Medicare Cuts, Tax Hikes
    The Obama administration rolled out its new budget proposal, which includes Medicare cuts and tax hikes for the wealthy. Kwame Holman has more on the budget from Capitol Hill. Gwen Ifill gets two reactions to the president's budget, first from Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., then White House economic adviser Gene Sperling.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2013

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