Tuesday, May 31, 2011

  • Is President Saleh Losing His Control Over Yemen?
    Heavy fighting resumed Tuesday in Yemen's capital after a cease-fire broke down between forces loyal to President Ali Abdullah Saleh and tribal militants. Margaret Warner discusses the country's power structure and Saleh's staying power with former U.S. Ambassador Barbara Bodine and Princeton University's Bernard Haykel.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2011
  • In Yemen, Cease-Fire Between Troops, Tribal Militia Fails Amid New Violence
    Heavy fighting resumed Tuesday in Yemen's capital of Sana'a after a cease-fire broke down between President Ali Abdullah Saleh's government troops and tribal militia. Margaret Warner reports on why Yemen's president remains in power amid growing violence and calls to step down.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2011
  • Neurosurgeon: 'Your Cell Phone Is Not Necessarily a Safe Device'
    A World Health Organization panel of 31 scientists raised some concerns Tuesday when they reported that cell phones are "possibly carcinogenic" and may be associated with "some risk" for brain cancer. But the group also called for further study. Jeffery Brown discusses concerns and precautions with neurosurgeon Keith Black.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2011
  • San Francisco Exhibit Reunites Gertrude Stein's Remarkable Art Collection
    During her time in Paris, American writer Gertrude Stein and her family amassed an amazing assemblage of groundbreaking art, including works from Picasso, Matisse and other notable artists. The collection has been reassembled for a limited time at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Spencer Michels reports.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2011
  • Reps. Clyburn, Roskam Debate Thinking Behind Debt-Ceiling Showdown
    House Republicans late Tuesday were staging what would be a largely symbolic vote on a bill ostensibly aimed at raising the U.S. debt limit by an additional $2.4 trillion, but without any spending cuts. The measure is not expected to pass. Judy Woodruff leads a debate between Reps. Peter Roskam, R-Ill., and James Clyburn, D-S.C.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2011
  • News Wrap: NATO Deaths Hit 55 for May, Including at Least 31 Americans
    In other news Tuesday, NATO said one of its troops was killed in eastern Afghanistan and the U.S. military announced three Americans died on Saturday. State-run TV in Syria reported that President Bashar al-Assad has issued a general amnesty for all political prisoners.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2011
  • Foreclosures, Unemployment, Confidence Continue to Drag Down Housing Market
    A new report released Tuesday showed the state of the U.S. housing market has grown even more bleak as prices have dropped for more than two consecutive quarters. Gwen Ifill, RealtyTrac's Rick Sharga and Mark Zandi of Moody's Analytics discuss which factors are responsible for the continuing strains on the market.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2011
  • Political Checklist: Debt Ceiling Vote Symbolism
    The House of Representatives is preparing to hold a symbolic vote on raising the U.S. government's debt ceiling without spending cuts, a vote that is sure to fail as Republicans prove that they won't support any increase in the limit without substantial cuts to spending.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2011

Monday, May 30, 2011

  • Fredericksburg Battlefield Lights Up in Memorial of Civil War Fallen
    On Memorial Day weekend, Fredericksburg National Cemetery lights up 15,300 luminaries, one for each of the soldiers buried there, in remembrance of all who fell during the Civil War.
    Original Air Date: May 30, 2011
  • Poet Honors American Service Personnel Killed in War
    Wyatt Prunty's poem, "The Returning Dead," is a response to the NewsHour's Honor Roll of service personnel killed in Iraq and Afghanistan. The poem first aired in 2006.
    Original Air Date: May 30, 2011
  • Vatican Maintains Stance on Condoms at HIV/AIDS Summit
    At a weekend HIV/AIDS conference at the Vatican, the Catholic Church stood firm on its stance against the use of condoms to protect against the transmission of HIV. Ray Suarez and the NewsHour's Global Health Unit report from Rome.
    Original Air Date: May 30, 2011
  • Meteorologist on Severe Weather: 'We Have Never Seen a Year Like This Before'
    The deadly Joplin, Mo., tornado was preceded this spring by a series of severe weather that brought devastation and death across parts of the South and Midwest. Judy Woodruff explores the science behind this year's remarkable severe weather.
    Original Air Date: May 30, 2011
  • Joplin Mayor: 'We Haven't Quite Started Rebuilding Yet'
    Record snow melt and heavy rain bloated the Missouri River, jeopardizing parts of five states Sunday and residents of Western Michigan reported tornado sightings. Meanwhile, residents of Joplin, Mo., are still digging out after a massive and deadly tornado. Gwen Ifill discusses the state of recovery efforts with Joplin Mayor Mike Woolston.
    Original Air Date: May 30, 2011
  • News Wrap: Yemeni Forces Try to Retake Militant-Held Town
    In other news Monday, government forces in Yemen went on the offensive, trying to recapture a town seized by Islamic militants. At least 30 militants, civilians and soldiers have been killed in fighting there since Friday. In Syria, protesters have begun to fight back with guns and grenades after government troops attacked two towns Sunday.
    Original Air Date: May 30, 2011
  • Obama Names 'Pragmatic' Gen. Dempsey to Head Joint Chiefs of Staff
    President Obama chose Memorial Day to announce that Gen. Martin Dempsey will succeed Adm. Mike Mullen as the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Jeffrey Brown discusses the president's announcement with former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Celeste Ward Gventer and Washington Post military correspondent Greg Jaffe.
    Original Air Date: May 30, 2011

Friday, May 27, 2011

  • Shields, Brooks on Patriot Act, N.Y. Race Upset, Medicare Politics, Palin Tour
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks discuss the week's top political news, including the Patriot Act extension clearing Congress being signed by President Obama, the Supreme Court decision to uphold Arizona's illegal workers law and the Ryan Medicare plan's impact on a New York House race.
    Original Air Date: May 27, 2011
  • G-8 Pledges Aid to Promote Arab Democracy; Fighting Spreads in Yemen
    Group of 8 leaders wrapped up their two-day summit in Deauville, France, on Friday by comparing the "Arab spring" to the fall of the Berlin Wall and promising up to $40 billion in aid to Tunisia and Egypt for their fight for democracy. Jeffrey Brown reports on the summit's conclusion and ongoing unrest around the Arab world.
    Original Air Date: May 27, 2011
  • Study: Boosting 'Good' Cholesterol Does Little to Prevent Heart Attacks
    A new study finds that drugs that boost HDL, also known as "good" cholesterol, do little to prevent heart attacks and strokes. Margaret Warner discusses what the results mean with Cleveland Clinic's Stephen Nissen.
    Original Air Date: May 27, 2011
  • Soaring College Costs Revive Debate Over a Diploma's Value
    As a growing number of students suffer the soaring costs of education debt many questions are being raised surrounding the value of a college education. Jeffrey Brown gets four views on whether today's diplomas are worth the bills.
    Original Air Date: May 27, 2011
  • Vatican Looks to Lead Conversation on Combating HIV/AIDS
    The Catholic Church is hosting a two day conference on the global fight against HIV/AIDS. Ray Suarez reports from Rome.
    Original Air Date: May 27, 2011
  • Weekly Poem: Deborah Landau Reads From 'The Last Usable Hour'
    Deborah Landau is the author of "Orchidelirium," which won the Anhinga Prize for Poetry, and "The Last Usable Hour" (2011, Copper Canyon Press). She co-hosts the video interview program, "Open Book," on Slate.com and is the director of the NYU Creative Writing Program.
    Original Air Date: May 27, 2011
  • Students Report on Washington, D.C.'s Dropout Epidemic
    Students from the Radio Rootz program investigate what's behind the large number of students dropping out of Washington, D.C. high schools.
    Original Air Date: May 27, 2011
  • Vatican Holding Conference on AIDS
    Ray Suarez reports from the Vatican on the debate over the use of condoms as HIV prevention and previews his coverage of the Vatican's AIDS conference.
    Original Air Date: May 27, 2011

Thursday, May 26, 2011

  • 'Kimjongilia' Film Highlights Harrowing Stories of Escape From North Korea
    In her documentary, "Kimjongilia," filmmaker N.C. Heikin tells tales of life in North Korea from the perspective of those who have managed to escape the country and its regime. This excerpt is part of a series of independently produced films from around the world aired in a partnership with The Economist magazine.
    Original Air Date: May 26, 2011
  • Shooting Rampage Suspect Loughner Ruled Mentally Unfit to Stand Trial
    A federal judge has ruled that Jared Loughner, accused in the Tucson shooting rampage that killed six people and wounded Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and 12 others, is mentally unfit to stand trial. Judy Woodruff discusses what the ruling means for Loughner, the victims and their families with Loyala Law School's Laurie Levenson.
    Original Air Date: May 26, 2011
  • Are Nurse Practitioners the Solution to Shortage of Primary-Care Doctors?
    As more Americans become covered by health insurance, the need for primary care is on the rise, but there is a shortage of primary-care physicians. Health correspondent Betty Ann Bowser reports from Philadelphia on the growing role of nurse practitioners as primary caregivers.
    Original Air Date: May 26, 2011
  • War Crimes Suspect Mladic 'Personified the Brutality' of Bosnian Conflict
    Fugitive Bosnian Serb Gen. Ratko Mladic, accused of the worst war crimes in Europe since WWII, was arrested in Serbia on Thursday. Margaret Warner discusses the significance of the arrest with U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes Issues Stephen Rapp and Human Rights Watch's Emma Daly.
    Original Air Date: May 26, 2011
  • Supreme Court Upholds Arizona Law Punishing Employers of Illegal Workers
    In a split decision Thursday, the Supreme Court ruled federal law does not preempt an Arizona measure that punishes employers who knowingly hire illegal immigrants. Jeffrey Brown discusses the measure, which could strip businesses of licenses if they're caught hiring illegal workers, with The National Law Journal's Marcia Coyle.
    Original Air Date: May 26, 2011

VIDEO SEARCH