Wednesday, August 21, 2013

  • D.C. Congresswoman on Organizing the March on Washington
    Decades before delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton would represent her district as a congresswoman on Capitol Hill, she worked as one of the original organizers for the March on Washington. Fifty years later, Holmes Norton reflects with Gwen Ifill on her efforts, part of a series of discussions on the legacy of August 28, 1963.
    Original Air Date: August 21, 2013
  • NSA Domestic Communication Collection Raises More Questions
    Newly declassified NSA documents show that for three years surveillance programs scooped up more than 50,000 personal emails per year from Americans who had no relation to terrorism. Margaret Warner talks to Siobhan Gorman of The Wall Street Journal about the significance of NSA's broad capability to intercept domestic messages.
    Original Air Date: August 21, 2013
  • Bradley Manning Gets 35 Years in Prison For Wikileaks
    Army Pfc. Bradley Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison for his role in the largest data leak in U.S. history. Manning provided the website WikiLeaks with hundreds of thousands of classified documents. Gwen Ifill discusses Manning's fate with Charlie Savage, who has been covering the case for The New York Times.
    Original Air Date: August 21, 2013
  • Will Attack Confirm Chemical Weapon Used by Syrian Regime?
    Will investigators find sufficient evidence of the use of chemical weapons by the Syrian government in this latest alleged attack on civilians? What makes this attack different? Ray Suarez asks Jeffrey White of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy and Amy Smithson of the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies.
    Original Air Date: August 21, 2013

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

  • Revised Lyme Disease Statistics Raise New Questions
    A new report from the Center for Disease Control says 300,000 Americans contract Lyme Disease each year, 10 times the amount previously believed by health officials. To examine the significance of this finding Jeffrey Brown speaks with Beth Daley, who has been investigating the disease and its impact for the Boston Globe.
    Original Air Date: August 20, 2013
  • Sports Fan in Chief Honors Champion 1972 Miami Dolphins
    More than 40 years since the 1972 Miami Dolphins made NFL history with their perfect season, coach Don Shula and his undefeated team were honored by President Barack Obama with a visit to the White House. Kwame Holman reports on the presidential tradition of following sports and Mr. Obama's dedication to his home teams.
    Original Air Date: August 20, 2013
  • States Grapple WIth Same Sex Marriage Rulings
    The Supreme Court handed down landmark rulings on same sex marriage in June, but the debate didn't end on decision day. Since then, states have been feeling the ripple effects. For an update, Ray Suarez turns to John Eastman of the National Organization for Marriage and James Esseks of the American Civil Liberties Union.
    Original Air Date: August 20, 2013
  • Al Jazeera America Debuts on Cable Amid Concerns in Market
    A new contender is launching in the competitive cable news market. Al Jazeera America promises more in-depth domestic news and fewer commercials. Judy Woodruff talks with Deborah Potter of NewsLab and Philip Seib of the University of Southern California for more on what to expect from the new network.
    Original Air Date: August 20, 2013
  • How Much Does Foreign Money Matter Affect Leverage in Egypt?
    With U.S. officials debating cutting Egyptian military aid while regional allies have offered to send money, what kind of influence over the interim government and political uncertainty will other nations have? Gwen Ifill gets analysis from Tarek Masoud of Harvard University and Hisham Melhem of Al Arabiya.
    Original Air Date: August 20, 2013
  • Boing Boing's Ingenuity Event
    Hari Sreenivasan talks to David Pescovitz about Boing Boing's first Ingenuity event, with hacking events, performances and theatrical events celebrating technology.
    Original Air Date: August 20, 2013

Monday, August 19, 2013

  • NASA Still Aims High in Asteroid Capture Mission
    The U.S. has explored space with telescopes, robotic rovers and its shuttle. Now facing budget cuts and reduced resources, NASA has had to reassess its ambitions while heeding the call for new discovery. Judy Woodruff talks to Joel Achenbach of the Washington Post about a new program that aims to capture a small asteroid.
    Original Air Date: August 19, 2013
  • Government Gridlock: Are We More Divided Than in the Past?
    Polls regularly find that Americans are unhappy with what's being done (or not done) in Washington. Jeffrey Brown sits down with Beverly Gage of Yale University, former Senate historian Richard Baker and Richard Norton Smith of George Mason University to get some historical perspective on shifts in America's political parties.
    Original Air Date: August 19, 2013
  • Do Innocent Citizens Risk Police Seizure of Their Property?
    Property seizure is a profitable practice for local law enforcement agencies, long used to deprive mobsters and drug kingpins. But the police can also take personal goods away from citizens who haven't been proven guilty of a crime. Ray Suarez talks to Sarah Stillman who investigated civil forfeiture for The New Yorker.
    Original Air Date: August 19, 2013
  • Egyptian Ambassador: Crackdown 'Wasn't to Use Massive Force'
    Mohamed Tawfik, Egypt's ambassador to the U.S., says he believes "one Egyptian dead is too many," but that it is up to the Muslim Brotherhood not to use weapons. In an exclusive interview, Tawfik joins Judy Woodruff to discuss events of the past week and the future of $1.3 billion in annual aid the U.S. provides to Egypt.
    Original Air Date: August 19, 2013
  • Egyptians Have Muted Reaction to Mubarak News
    According to Nancy Youssef of McClatchy Newspapers, Egyptians have had a "surprisingly muted" response to news that deposed leader Hosni Mubarak may be released. She talks to Jeffrey Brown about the killing of Muslim Brotherhood detainees by the government and pressures for journalists covering the turmoil.
    Original Air Date: August 19, 2013

Sunday, August 18, 2013

  • Civilian Patrols Complicate Crisis in Egypt
    Maria Abi-Habib, roving Middle East correspondent for The Wall Street Journal, joins Hari Sreenivasan from Cairo via Skype. Abi-Habib looks at the growing number of neighborhood civilian "committees" patrolling the streets, a trend born of a lack of confidence in the country's security forces.
    Original Air Date: August 18, 2013
  • The Long-Term Significance of the Muslim Brotherhood
    Zachary Lockman, professor of modern Middle Eastern History at New York University joins Hari Sreenivasan to speak about the wider issues raised by the ongoing conflict in Egypt.
    Original Air Date: August 18, 2013

Friday, August 16, 2013

  • Harper, Musselwhite Show Off 'Different Shades of Blues'
    Charlie Musselwhite and Ben Harper may have a generation between them, but their love of blues brought them together. With Musselwhite on the harmonica and Harper on guitar and vocals, the two musicians have collaborated on an album, "Get Up." Jeffrey Brown sits down with the artists for a taste of their 'all purpose blues.'
    Original Air Date: August 16, 2013
  • Shields and Brooks on Egyptian Bloodshed, N.C. Voter ID Law
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks talk to Judy Woodruff about the week's top political news, including how the U.S. should be responding to continuing clashes in Egypt, their take on the new N.C. Voter ID law and late political columnist Jack Germond's greatest legacy.
    Original Air Date: August 16, 2013
  • Ecuador Exposes Rain Forest to Oil Extraction Effort
    Thousands of species of plant and wildlife call Ecuador's Yasuni National Park home, but it is believed that beneath the lush floor lies $7.2 billion of oil. Drilling could threaten the rain forest's biodiversity and indigenous populations. Some scientists argue a balance could be found. Hari Sreenivasan reports.
    Original Air Date: August 16, 2013
  • Examining Kepler's Contribution to Space Research
    Since its launch in 2009, the Kepler space telescope has discovered more than 35,000 possible planets, but it will soon go dark forever. NASA has confirmed the spacecraft is beyond repair. As astronomers begin to look at Kepler's legacy, Judy Woodruff speaks with space and science writer Michael Lemonick.
    Original Air Date: August 16, 2013
  • Surveillance Court Can't Stop NSA from Violating Privacy
    A new report from the Washington Post revealed the National Security Agency has violated privacy rules 'thousands of times' each year since 2008. In a follow up, chief judge Reggie Walton told the Post the FISA court isn't able to verify when the NSA oversteps its authority. Margaret Warner speaks with Carol Leonnig of the Post.
    Original Air Date: August 16, 2013
  • Muslim Brotherhood Show No Sign of Backing Down
    It's 'all or nothing' for protesters in Cairo who so far show no signs of backing down despite continued use of force from security forces. Jeffrey Brown is joined by Nancy Youssef of McClatchy Newspapers to discuss how the Muslim Brotherhood is rallying support and Egyptian reaction to the U.S.'s response to the violence.
    Original Air Date: August 16, 2013
  • Watch Ben Harper and Charlie Musselwhite Harmonize
    Blues musicians Ben Harper, Charlie Musselwhite performed the acoustic guitar-harmonica duet, "You Found Another Lover (I Lost Another Friend)" for Art Beat at the Gibson showroom in Washington, D.C. The song is off the duo's recent album, "Get Up."
    Original Air Date: August 16, 2013
  • What Can Virtual Reality Do for You?
    Force for good or ill? Economics correspondent Paul Solman explores the latest virtual reality technology with Stanford University's Jeremy Bailenson, and weighs its societal impact with Jaron Lanier, author of "Who Owns the Future?"
    Original Air Date: August 16, 2013

Thursday, August 15, 2013

  • Pediatricians Add Reading to Essential Check-Up List
    National literacy program Reach Out and Read reaches kids in a place where they are almost guaranteed to visit: the doctor's office. Special correspondent John Merrow meets a new breed of pediatrician -- part doctor, part teacher -- who help parents share books with their children to improve and encourage cognitive development.
    Original Air Date: August 15, 2013
  • Mistaken Identity for Elusive Olinguito, World's New Mammal
    Misidentified for decades, this newly classified member of the raccoon family finally made its scientific debut. Jeffrey Brown discusses the surprising discovery with zoologist Kristofer Helgen of the Smithsonian Institution, who tracked the animal down to the cloud forests of Ecuador.
    Original Air Date: August 15, 2013
  • Does the Pentagon's Plan Do Enough to Curb Sexual Assault?
    The Defense Department is offering new initiatives to help combat sexual assault in the military, keeping adjudication within the chain of command. Will the plan help protect victims and prosecute offenders? Jeffrey Brown gets debate from attorney Susan Burke and retired Maj. Gen. John Altenburg, a former Army lawyer.
    Original Air Date: August 15, 2013

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