Monday, August 29, 2011

  • Tar Sands Pipeline Plan Renews Energy vs. Environment Debate
    A proposed oil pipeline will stretch from Alberta, Canada, to refineries in Texas. Jeffrey Brown discusses the debate surrounding the Keystone XL pipeline with two experts.
    Original Air Date: August 29, 2011
  • What Does Data Reveal About the Geography of Marriage?
    A recent wave of data offers new insights into the geography of marriage and about the institution itself. Ray Suarez talks to analysts.
    Original Air Date: August 29, 2011
  • Gadhafi's Family Flees, but Hunt Remains for Libyan Leader
    As Libyan rebels shift their hunt for Moammar Gadhafi toward his hometown of Sirte on Monday, the leader's wife, daughter and two sons fled to neighboring Algeria. Margaret Warner discusses the rebels' latest efforts with The Washington Post's Simon Denyer.
    Original Air Date: August 29, 2011
  • Emergency Departments Struggle With Growing Drug Shortages
    The number of medications on the Food and Drug Administration's shortage list keeps growing. And while calcium chloride and potassium phosphate aren't drug names the average American would recognize, they're critical to patients visiting the emergency room every day.
    Original Air Date: August 29, 2011
  • Weekly Poem: 'All I Know About Love' by Lynnell Edwards
    Lynnell Edwards is the author of two collections of poetry, both from Red Hen Press: "The Highwayman's Wife" (2007) and "The Farmer's Daughter" (2003). She teaches at the University of Louisville.
    Original Air Date: August 29, 2011

Friday, August 26, 2011

  • MLK Memorial Emerges From Stone on National Mall, After Decades of Planning
    This weekend's dedication ceremony for the new memorial honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. has been postponed due to Hurricane Irene, but the public has already had an opportunity to reflect on the newest monument in Washington. Hari Sreenivasan reports.
    Original Air Date: August 26, 2011
  • Shields and Brooks on GOP's Zeitgeist, Whether Obama Gets Credit for Libya
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks weigh in on the week's top political news, including Texas Gov. Rick Perry's leapfrog over Mitt Romney in the national polls and whether President Obama deserves -- or is getting -- credit for helping topple Moammar Gadhafi's regime.
    Original Air Date: August 26, 2011
  • The Doubleheader: Rick Perry's Rise, Cheney's Book and Peyton Manning
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks talk about the politics of sport and the sport of politics. On the menu include Texas Gov. Rick Perry's rise to the top of the GOP presidential field, Vice President Dick Cheney's memoir and Peyton Manning's status with the Indianapolis Colts.
    Original Air Date: August 26, 2011
  • Eastern Seaboard Braces for Potentially 'Historic' Hurricane Irene
    Hurricane Irene was headed for a weekend assault up the populous East Coast, threatening to bring powerful winds and heavy rain to tens of millions of Americans. Jeffrey Brown discusses the approaching storm with Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Craig Fugate and Ed Rappaport of the National Hurricane Center.
    Original Air Date: August 26, 2011
  • Car of the Future Will Keep Us Safe Behind the Wheel at any Age
    Hari Sreenivasan talked with Dr. Joseph F Coughlin, Director of the MIT AgeLab and the New England University Transportation Center about the car of the future. Coughlin says automobile technology will reflect a baby boomer generation that will live longer, are more technology savy, and will demand to stay on the road longer than previous generations.
    Original Air Date: August 26, 2011

Thursday, August 25, 2011

  • Thursday, August 25, 2011
    We get reports from the ground as the search for Colonel Moammar Gadhafi continues and battles rage on in Libya. Also, Jeffrey Brown sits down with Republican presidential hopeful and former Governor of Utah John Huntsman and we examine the fallout for Apple a day after Steve Jobs stepped down as CEO. Finally, a profile of legendary coach Pat Summit as she takes on her biggest challenge.
    Original Air Date: August 25, 2011
  • Huntsman: I Can 'Put the Numbers Together to Actually Win in 2012'
    In an interview Thursday with Jeffrey Brown, presidential hopeful and former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman said that wealthy Americans will need to share sacrifices to help get the U.S. economy back on track. He also discussed the latest developments in Libya, extending the payroll tax cuts and his rivals for the Republican nomination.
    Original Air Date: August 25, 2011
  • In 'Old People Driving,' Handing Over the Keys Means the End of the Road
    In "Old People Driving," filmmaker Shaleece Haas examines how aging Americans can balance safety and independence as the ranks of drivers 85 and older surpasses 3 million. This excerpt is part of The Economist Film Project series of independently produced films aired in partnership between The Economist and the NewsHour.
    Original Air Date: August 25, 2011
  • For Legendary Coach Summitt, Next Opponent Is Dementia Diagnosis
    Pat Summitt, the winningest coach in college basketball history, has been diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's. Hari Sreenivasan talks to her son Tyler Summitt and The Washington Post's Sally Jenkins about how the coach is coping and staying focused on her team after 37 seasons leading the University of Tennessee's Lady Vols.
    Original Air Date: August 25, 2011
  • What Will Happen to Innovation at Apple With Jobs Out as CEO?
    Apple announced Wednesday that CEO and co-founder Steve Jobs had stepped down from his helm, but will serve as chairman of the board. Ray Suarez discusses Jobs' lasting impact on innovation and what comes next for Apple and the tech world with Walter Mossberg of The Wall Street Journal and Charles Golvin of Forrester Research.
    Original Air Date: August 25, 2011
  • Hunt for Gadhafi Intensifies, New Battles Rage in Tripoli
    Gunfire and explosions hammered parts of Libya's capital on Thursday as rebels swept through neighborhoods in search of Moammar Ghadfi. International Television News' James Mates and Lindsey Hilsum report from Tripoli, where the fighting of this civil war has intensified
    Original Air Date: August 25, 2011
  • Jon Huntsman: I Wouldn't Hesitate to Call on Rich to Sacrifice
    In an interview with the PBS NewsHour, Republican presidential candidate and former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman said he would call on all Americans, including the wealthy, to sacrifice in order to address the country's fiscal problems.
    Original Air Date: August 25, 2011

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

  • Why the Sioux Are Refusing $1.3 Billion
    Members of the Great Sioux Nation could pocket a large sum set aside by the government for taking the resource-rich Black Hills away from the tribes in 1877. But leaders say the sacred land was never, and still isn't, for sale.
    Original Air Date: August 24, 2011
  • 'Conquistadora' Paints Epic Tale of Love, Adventure in Puerto Rico
    The new novel "Conquistadora" paints a picture of love and adventure as a young women travels from Spain to Puerto Rico where her husband has inherited a sugar plantation. Jeffrey Brown speaks with author Esmeralda Santiago about the epic story and her own tale of teaching herself to read and write again after a stroke.
    Original Air Date: August 24, 2011
  • The Politics of Confirming the President's Judicial Nominees
    The confirmation of President Obama's judicial nominees has been delayed. Judy Woodruff discusses the politics of confirming the nominees to the federal bench with Committee for Justice's Curt Levey and the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy's Caroline Fredrickson.
    Original Air Date: August 24, 2011
  • Libyans Show 'Best of Humanity' in Aiding Journalists' Escape From Hotel
    Dozens of journalists were finally allowed to leave the Rixos Hotel in Tripoli Wednesday after being trapped for several days under the control of forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi. International Television News' John Ray, who was among the journalists being held captive, discusses the journalists' ordeal and his escape.
    Original Air Date: August 24, 2011
  • Alabama's Immigration Law: Radical or Within Reason?
    A federal judge in Alabama heard arguments Wednesday on whether to block the state's new immigration law. Ray Suarez gets two views.
    Original Air Date: August 24, 2011
  • 'Ridiculous' Winds From Hurricane Irene Bear Down on East Coast
    The Bahamas braced for landfall from Hurricane Irene on Wednesday, as it reached Category 3 status, with winds topping 120 miles an hour. Jeffrey Brown discusses the storm with Accuweather.com's Jim Kosek.
    Original Air Date: August 24, 2011

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

  • 'Clearing the Smoke': The Benefits, Limits of Medical Marijuana
    Sixteen states have passed laws that allow patients to use medical marijuana to treat side effects of various illnesses, but now some are moving to either limit or repeal those laws. Anna Rau of Montana PBS reports.
    Original Air Date: August 23, 2011
  • Were the Legalities of the Strauss Kahn Case Handled Correctly?
    After a New York judge dropped the assault charges against IMF head Dominique Strauss Kahn, questions arose on how the case was handled. Ray Suarez gets two views.
    Original Air Date: August 23, 2011
  • More Than 12 Million May Have Felt Unusual East Coast Earthquake
    A 5.8-magnitude earthquake shook much of the East Coast Tuesday afternoon, including Washington, D.C. and New York City. Hari Sreenivasan discusses the shaking with the U.S. Geology Survey's David Applegate.
    Original Air Date: August 23, 2011
  • Amid Chaotic Scene in Tripoli, Gadhafi Regime Slowly Unravels
    Libyan rebels gained access to Moammar Gadhafi's Tripoli compound after intense fighting on Tuesday. Jeffrey Brown gets on-the-ground reports from Libya on the fighting and the political situation.
    Original Air Date: August 23, 2011

Monday, August 22, 2011

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