Tuesday, October 8, 2013

  • Monaco: ‘Go after those who would seek to do us harm'
    Twin raids in Africa over the weekend resulted in the capture of an al-Qaida leader, now being questioned by U.S. military. Jeffrey Brown sits down with White House Counterterrorism Adviser Lisa Monaco to discuss the standard for determining terrorist threats and whether or not Libyan officials were consulted prior to the raid.
    Original Air Date: October 8, 2013
  • Boehner: President’s position on budget 'is just not sust
    House Speaker John Boehner responded to President Barack Obama's news conference on the shutdown and debt ceiling Tuesday afternoon, saying that the president refused to negotiate.Boehner said the president's position on the budget "is just not sustainable.""I didn't come here to shut down the government," Boehner said. "I sure didn't come here to default on our debt."
    Original Air Date: October 8, 2013
  • What it means to land on the World Monuments Watch list
    Bonnie Burnham, president of the World Monuments Fund, a non-profit that is dedicated to preserving endangered historic, architectural and cultural sites, explains the fund's annual watch list. This year, 67 sites, including lesser-known spots, made the list. Burnham and PBS NewsHour's Jeffrey Brown talk about the list and how organizations can support sites that end up on it.
    Original Air Date: October 8, 2013
  • What made the 2014 World Monument Watch List and why?
    They are under threat from war, the environment, economic development and more: 67 sites in 41 countries on the 2014 World Monument Watch just released Tuesday. PBS NewsHour's Jeffrey Brown spoke with Bonnie Burnham, president of the World Monuments Fund, a non-profit organization that issues the annual list and dedicated to preserving endangered historic, architectural and cultural sites. 
    Original Air Date: October 8, 2013
  • Obama: "We can't make extortion routine"
    President Barack Obama delivered a statement Tuesday afternoon, stressing again that he's willing to negotiate with Republicans, but not under "threats of a government shutdown or economic chaos." The president also said that he's remaining steadfast in the budget battle because "we can't make extortion routine as part of our democracy. Democracy doesn't function this way."
    Original Air Date: October 8, 2013

Monday, October 7, 2013

  • States opt-out Medicaid, leave 'larger impact than expected'
    As the effects of the shutdown take hold, longer-term fights over safety net programs continue. Jeffrey Brown talks to Jacob Hacker of Yale University and Stephen Parenti of the University of Minnesota about how states opting out of the Affordable Care Act's Medicaid expansion has stranded some uninsured Americans.
    Original Air Date: October 7, 2013
  • Polio vaccine campaign faces opposition, apathy in Pakistan
    Most of the world is polio-free, but not in Pakistan, where setbacks have hampered efforts to eradicate the virus. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on how health workers are working to reverse perceptions created by religious extremists and fight public indifference.
    Original Air Date: October 7, 2013
  • Political unrest is common among African militant groups
    The high-risk mission to capture of Abu Anas al-Libi in Libya may prove to have a high payoff in terms of gained intelligence. Judy Woodruff talks to chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner and Jeremy Bash, a former Defense Department official, about U.S. efforts to go after al-Qaida groups in Africa.
    Original Air Date: October 7, 2013
  • Supreme Court opens cases on campaign money, abortion
    Despite the government shutdown, the Supreme Court reopened on time ready to hear cases that revisit issues of campaign contributions, abortion and prayer in government. Marcia Coyle of The National Law Journal joins Ray Suarez to preview the high court's fall session and which cases may still make it on the docket.
    Original Air Date: October 7, 2013
  • House Built for Healing
    More than 100 Washington, D.C., college students built an energy-efficient solar powered home for the 2013 Department of Energy Solar Decathlon competition. But what distinguishes this home is the person who it was built for. The students designed their entry with a war veteran in mind. They will donate the home to an Iraq and Afghanistan veteran who suffers from PTSD and a traumatic brain injury.
    Original Air Date: October 7, 2013
    October 7, 2013
  • House GOP plan unclear as Obama reiterates no negotiation
    President Barack Obama spoke at FEMA where he said he will not negotiate with House Republicans while the shutdown continues. A senior presidential adviser suggested the White House might be open to a short-term debt limit increase. Judy Woodruff talks to Robert Costa of the National Review about the continuing impasse.
    Original Air Date: October 7, 2013
  • House built for healing
    More than 100 Washington, D.C., college students built an energy-efficient solar powered homefor the 2013 Department of Energy Solar Decathlon competition. But whatdistinguishes this home is the person who it was built for. The students designedtheir entry with a war veteran in mind. They will donate the home to an Iraq andAfghanistan veteran who suffers from PTSD and a traumatic brain injury.
    Original Air Date: October 7, 2013
    October 7, 2013

Sunday, October 6, 2013

  • Growing threats of Islamic militancy in Africa
    Deputy Director of the Atlantic Council's Africa Center, Bronwyn Brunton joins Hari Sreenivasan from Washington to give us a closer look at the worrying evolution of Islamic militancy across the African continent.
    Original Air Date: October 6, 2013
  • Nobel Prize alternative celebrates the funny and unusual
    Every year at a gala ceremony in Harvard’s Sanders Theater the Ig Nobel prizes are awarded for achievements in science that first make people laugh, then think. Actual Nobel laureates are drafted to present awards to research into subjects like the effects of opera on mouse heart-transplant patients and the phenomenon commonly known as “beer goggles.”
    Original Air Date: October 6, 2013
  • Is withdrawal from Afghanistan still on schedule?
    12 years after the so-called ‘war on terror’ began in 2011, an estimated 55-60,000 American troops remain in Afghanistan. The Obama Administration has said all American combat forces will be pulled from Afghanistan by the end of next year. For more, New York Times foreign correspondent Matthew Rosenberg joins us from Kabul via Skype.
    Original Air Date: October 6, 2013
  • Enstitute: The entrepreneurial alternative to college
    As the cost of higher education mounts, debt-laden students, cash-strapped parents and members of the media are asking: is traditional college still the answer? Correspondent Mona Iskander reports on Enstitute, a two-year apprenticeship program that matches 18- to 24-year-olds with some of New York's top entrepreneurs.
    Original Air Date: October 6, 2013

Saturday, October 5, 2013

  • Obama and Boehner escalate war of words
    The Wall Street Journal’s Janet Hook talks with Hari Sreenivasan about the increasingly contentious war of words between President Obama and Speaker Boehner. Hooks says that the unanimous vote on federal worker pay relieves pressure on Congress only briefly, as the debt ceiling deadline looms.
    Original Air Date: October 5, 2013
  • Obama reacts to continued government shutdown
    Julie Pace, White House Correspondent for the Associated Press got an exclusive interview with President Obama on Friday, four days into the partial government shutdown. Pace shared the President's comments on the shutdown and the impending debt ceiling with Hari Sreenivasan.
    Original Air Date: October 5, 2013
  • Conflict minerals from the Congo to your cellphone
    National Geographic photographer Marcus Bleasdale has spent decades finding beauty in trauma. His recent work in the Congo is featured in the magazine’s 125th anniversary issue celebrating its history of photographic excellence. “The Price of Precious” documents child labor in camps that extract not blood diamonds, but tin, tungsten and tantalum -- minerals used in electronic products.
    Original Air Date: October 5, 2013
  • 'Lots of important things are funny'
    "Lots of important things are funny." So says the founder of the Ig Nobel prize ceremony, Marc Abrahams. Abrahams is the editor and co-founder of the magazine, The Annals of Improbable Research and a columnist for The Guardian. The prize honors achievements that "make you laugh, then make you think".
    Original Air Date: October 5, 2013

Friday, October 4, 2013

  • Brooks, Dionne: Budget battle is 'debate with no substance'
    New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week's top political news, including the lack of progress being made to end the government shutdown, the upcoming debt ceiling fight and how recent dysfunction is set to amplify the nation's poor opinion of Congress.
    Original Air Date: October 4, 2013
  • Outstanding public servants honored amid shutdown furloughs
    The Partnership for Public Service honors outstanding achievements by civil servants. But this year, four of the nine honorees are furloughed due to the government shutdown. Jeffrey Brown talks to Air Force Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Kevin Geiss, the winner of the Management Excellence Medal.
    Original Air Date: October 4, 2013
  • Twitter's revenue numbers reflect general shift of web
    Social media giant Twitter says it has 100 million daily users who create 500 million tweets a day. The company's new IPO filing gives the the world its first look at the business-side of Twitter. Hari Sreenivasan talks to Zach Seward of Quartz about the company's plan to offer shares and whether investors will bite.
    Original Air Date: October 4, 2013
  • Bitcoin gains mainstream interest after 'outlier' appeal
    Bitcoin, a digital currency, has appealed to high-tech skeptics of government-issued money, as well as global criminals who are eager and able to capitalize on a totally free market. But mainstream investors are taking notice. Paul Solman reports on the potential, advantages and risks of this crypto-currency.
    Original Air Date: October 4, 2013
  • Legal, financial perils don't end for African migrants
    The shipwreck and subsequent death of hundreds of African migrants off the Italian island Lampedusa has captured global attention. But this tragedy is not a one-time occurrence. Jeff Crisp of Refugees International joins Ray Suarez to discuss the lengths migrants go to make it to Europe and the tensions it causes within the EU.
    Original Air Date: October 4, 2013
  • During shutdown, more critical debt ceiling deadline looms
    Within the GOP House ranks, there was strong sentiment not to give in and vote for a straight spending bill. On the debt ceiling, Speaker John Boehner said Republicans will insist on budget cuts before raising the borrowing limit. The president said he'd negotiate only after the government reopens. Kwame Holman reports.
    Original Air Date: October 4, 2013
  • Can CT scans for smokers save lives?
    Dr. Senay is an Assistant Clinical Professor in Preventive Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Dr. Henschke is a Professor of Radiology. The USPSTF recently gave a high recommendation to low dose CT scans for lung cancer. If the task force finalizes the grade for this screening, healthcare insurers will be required by the ACA to cover it with no copay. Their conversation starts with that premise.
    Original Air Date: October 4, 2013
  • On Day 4, Boehner: 'This isn't some damn game'
    House Speaker John Boehner and other GOP leadership addressed the government shutdown -- in its fourth day -- Friday morning. Responding to an anonymous White House quote saying that the Democrats were "winning" the shutdown, Boehner said: "This isn't some damn game. The American people don't want their government shut down and neither do I."
    Original Air Date: October 4, 2013

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