Tuesday, January 7, 2014

  • World Food Programme faces unusual quadruple food emergency
    The World Food Programme is fighting major food emergencies in the Central African Republic, South Sudan, Syria and the Philippines. Jeffrey Brown talks to Ertharin Cousin, executive director of the UN organization, about the great challenge of relieving hunger in inaccessible regions that have been plunged into conflict.
    Original Air Date: January 7, 2014
  • JPMorgan settles for $2.6 billion fine over Madoff fallout
    JPMorgan Chase agreed to pay a record-breaking $2.6 billion fine to settle criminal charges related to the Bernie Madoff fraud case. Authorities charged the bank had turned a blind eye to Madoff's massive Ponzi scheme. Jeffrey Brown gets more detail from Patricia Hurtado of Bloomberg News.
    Original Air Date: January 7, 2014
  • News Wrap: Iraq strikes back against al-Qaida militants
    In our news wrap Tuesday, the Iraqi government attacked al-Qaida militants who have been holding the cities of Ramadi and Fallujah for days. Also, a first round of chemical weapons have left Syria. The UN announced that poison gas materials were put to sea to later be destroyed on a U.S. Navy ship.
    Original Air Date: January 7, 2014
  • How freezing North Pole temperatures arrived at the U.S.
    The strong winds that normally keep the masses of very cold air contained near the North Pole weakened this week, allowing frigid temperatures to reach down into the United States. Judy Woodruff talks to Andrew Freedman of Climate Central about the science behind the polar vortex.
    Original Air Date: January 7, 2014
    Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images
  • Kate DiCamillo’s favorite children’s books for snow days
    Because of the recent spate of school closings and sub-zero temperatures across the country, we asked Kate DiCamillo, the new National Ambassador for Young People's Literature, to recommend books perfect for kids stuck inside: E. B. White’s “Charlotte’s Web” and “Stuart Little,” and “The Borrowers” by Mary Norton and “Wonder” by R.J. Palacio.
    Original Air Date: January 7, 2014

Monday, January 6, 2014

  • What's new at the Consumer Electronics Show
    The Internet is moving beyond computers and phones. From your toaster to your car to your socks, almost everything you touch can be wired for connectivity. Judy Woodruff talks to Cecilia Kang of The Washington Post about the technological breakthroughs featured at the annual Consumer Electronics Show.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014
  • Alzheimer's researchers seek better prevention
    With no cure or successful treatment yet available, scientists are hoping to stave off Alzheimer's devastating debilitation by treating people before they show a single symptom. Jeffrey Brown reports on how researchers are looking at risk signs, lifestyle factors and alternative therapies to help keep brains healthy.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014
  • Poet-Doctor Rafael Campo reads 'Primary Care'
    Doctor, professor and highly-regarded poet Rafael Campo reads "Primary Care," a poem from his recently published sixth collection, "Alternative Medicine," which explores the primal relationship between language, empathy and healing.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014
  • Poet-Doctor Rafael Campo reads 'Hospital Song'
    Doctor, professor and highly-regarded poet Rafael Campo reads "Hospital Song," a poem from his recently published sixth collection, "Alternative Medicine," which explores the primal relationship between language, empathy and healing.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014
  • Poet-Doctor Rafael Campo reads 'Health'
    Doctor, professor and highly-regarded poet Rafael Campo reads "Health," a poem from his recently published sixth collection, "Alternative Medicine," which explores the primal relationship between language, empathy and healing.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014
  • Congress dives into fight over jobless benefits
    Emergency benefits for the long-term unemployed stopped for 1.3 million Americans at the end of December. Kwame Holman recaps the political debate over restarting those payments. Gwen Ifill gets perspectives from Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez and Douglas Holtz-Eakin of the American Action Forum on how to address unemployment.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014
  • Three medical students nurture the soul through poetry
    Three Harvard medical students, who chose to take time out from their hectic schedules to focus on reading poetry and honing their own writing skills, credit poetry with "feeding the soul," "doing justice" to hard realities that prose couldn't adequately address and giving them perspective on the parallels between medicine and writing.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014
  • Doctor/Poet Rafael Campo finds rhythm through a stethoscope
    Rafael Campo is a doctor, professor and highly-regarded poet who has just published his sixth volume titled, "Alternative Medicine," which explores the primal relationship between language, empathy and healing. For Campo, poetry and healing are intricately related. "To me the patients voice, the stories they have to tell are absolutely central to the work of healing."
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014
  • What is U.S.'s role in driving out al-Qaida in Iraq?
    While Iraqi government tanks lined the outskirts of Fallujah, Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki urged Sunni tribal leaders to help drive out al-Qaida militants. Judy Woodruff talks to journalist Jane Arraf and former U.S. ambassador to Iraq James F. Jeffrey about the sectarian grievances at play and the U.S.’s role.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014
  • Midwest mayors confront chilling weather
    Gwen Ifill talks to Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges and St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay about the precautions they are taking in their cities and what special help they offer for citizens like the elderly and the impoverished who may be in greater danger during this winter chill.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014

Sunday, January 5, 2014

  • Vancouver law cuts drunken-driving deaths in half
    Correspondent William Brangham reports on recent changes to laws in British Columbia that have led to a dramatic decrease (roughly 50%) in alcohol-related fatalities over the past two years. BC officials ramped up penalties on drivers who tested at a much lower blood alcohol level (.05, as opposed to the current .08 legal standard) and authorized police to immediately impound cars.
    Original Air Date: January 5, 2014
  • What will be Bloomberg’s legacy on climate change?
    Michael Bloomberg left office a few days ago after serving 12 years as the Mayor of New York city and people already are trying to assess his legacy. Katherine Bagley of Inside Climate News speaks on why she thinks the mayor's efforts to address climate change are so significant.
    Original Air Date: January 5, 2014
  • Hezbollah upgrades missile threat to Israel
    A new source of conflict in the Middle East might be emerging. The Wall Street Journal reported this week that the Islamic militant group, Hezbollah, is getting more advanced weaponry that could be far more precise in their attacks.
    Original Air Date: January 5, 2014

Saturday, January 4, 2014

  • Al-Qaida group takes control of central Fallujah
    The Iraq army shelled the city of Fallujah on Saturday in attempts to take back control from the Al-Qaida affiliated group known as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), which has also overrun the town of Ramadi. Liz Sly of the Washington Post joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss what is unfolding in Iraq and the larger implications for the Middle East.
    Original Air Date: January 4, 2014

Friday, January 3, 2014

  • Shields and Brooks discuss addressing economic inequality
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week's top political news, including the inauguration of New York's new Mayor Bill de Blasio and his pledge to address economic inequality, plus how new laws on legal marijuana signal a U.S. cultural shift.
    Original Air Date: January 3, 2014
  • More Latinos move to long-term care facilities
    Traditionally, Latino American seniors have lived out their years at home, receiving care from family members. But as economic factors shift, more Latino elders are moving to nursing homes or going to day centers to receive additional support. The NewsHour's Mary Jo Brooks reports on how some facilities have addressed the need.
    Original Air Date: January 3, 2014
  • Study finds more ER visits with Medicaid coverage
    A new study published in "Science" found that low-income people who have Medicaid insurance go to the emergency room for care 40 percent more than their counterpoints without any insurance. Katherine Baicker of Harvard School of Public Health, a co-author of the study, joins Hari Sreenivasan
    Original Air Date: January 3, 2014
  • Boeing workers vote on critical labor contract
    Thirty-thousand machinists employed by Boeing voted on a labor contract that will decide whether the company will build a new factory in Seattle or move to another state. Jeffrey Brown reviews what's at stake with Harley Shaiken of the University of California, Berkeley, and Richard Gritta of the University of Portland.
    Original Air Date: January 3, 2014
  • Is latest sectarian fighting in Iraq a misstep for al-Qaida?
    In Iraq's Anbar province, Sunni militants linked to al-Qaida have escalated a fight against Shiite-led government troops, blowing up official buildings. Judy Woodruff talks to author Bing West and Ryan Crocker, former U.S. ambassador to Iraq, about the latest sectarian violence and how tribes from Anbar have joined in the fight.
    Original Air Date: January 3, 2014

Thursday, January 2, 2014

  • Examining Obama's options to push his agenda in 2014
    President Obama emerged from 2013 with near all-time low job approval ratings after the botched rollout of the health care law. Susan Page of USA Today and Jerry Seib of The Wall Street Journal join Judy Woodruff to discuss what the president can try to do to achieve a productive year as midterm elections approach.
    Original Air Date: January 2, 2014
  • What role does the human touch play in the digital age?
    In a digital age that creates more automated services at ever lower prices, how can we retain the value of human work and relationships? Hari Sreenivasan ponders this with computer scientist Jaron Lanier, author of "Who Owns the Future?", and Andrew McAfee from MIT's Center for Digital Business at the Sloan School of Management.
    Original Air Date: January 2, 2014
  • Should lawmakers repeal cuts to military pensions?
    When Congress reached a budget deal to fund the federal government, one of the controversial items they agreed to was a cut in military pensions. But does this break a promise to those who have served? Jeffrey Brown gets perspective from retired Vice Adm. Norbert Ryan and former Assistant Secretary of Defense Lawrence Korb.
    Original Air Date: January 2, 2014
  • Envoy says administration to transfer Guantanamo detainees
    In the long saga to close Guantanamo Bay, nine detainees were transferred from the prison in December, including the three remaining ethnic Uighurs who had been captured in 2001. Judy Woodruff discusses that milestone and the prison's future with Cliff Sloan, the State Department's special envoy for Guantanamo closure.
    Original Air Date: January 2, 2014

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