Monday, January 4, 2016

  • Wounded vets can’t get help with in vitro fertilization
    U.S. military veterans who are having trouble starting families due to combat injuries do not get financial assistance from the V.A. for in vitro fertilization, leaving couples to pay for the costly treatments themselves. Efforts made in Congress to change that rule have been blocked. William Brangham reports.
    Original Air Date: January 4, 2016
    This illustration shows in vitro fertilization, in which a single sperm is injected into the cytoplasm of an egg. Image by Brand X Pictures and Getty Images.
  • Sweden, Denmark move to tighten their borders
    Denmark is instituting ID checks on its frontier with Germany, just as Sweden has enacted a strict new border policy, steps that further erode the 20-year Schengen Agreement guaranteeing free movement across most of mainland Europe. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports.
    Original Air Date: January 4, 2016
    Danish Police officers check vehicles at the bordertown of Krusa, Denmark January 4, 2016. Denmark imposed temporary identity checks on its border with Germany on Monday following a similar move by Sweden, dealing a double blow to Europe's fraying passport-free Schengen area amid a record influx of migrants. REUTERS/Palle Peter Skov/Scanpix Denmark  ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS PICTURE IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. DENMARK OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN DENMARK. NO COMMERCIAL SALES. - RTX20YOT
  • Bill Clinton returns to the trail to campaign for Hillary
    Former President Bill Clinton made his first solo appearances on the campaign trail in New Hampshire to support his wife Hillary's 2016 campaign. Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report and Tamara Keith of NPR join Judy Woodruff to discuss the strategy behind Donald Trump’s first television ad, plus Gov. Chris Christie’s pitch to New Hampshire voters.
    Original Air Date: January 4, 2016
    Former U.S. President Bill Clinton addresses a campaign rally for his wife, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, in Nashua, New Hampshire January 4, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder - RTX2101H
  • How does Iran-Saudi Arabia crisis affect Mideast diplomacy?
    Why did Saudi Arabia execute a prominent Shiite cleric if it knew that it would inflame tensions with Iran? Judy Woodruff gets analysis of what that rivalry means for the region from Vali Nasr of John Hopkins University and Randa Slim of the Middle East Institute.
    Original Air Date: January 4, 2016
    Supporters of Shi'ite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr protest against the execution of Shi'ite Muslim cleric Nimr al-Nimr in Saudi Arabia, during a demonstration in Baghdad January 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani - RTX20ZVM

Sunday, January 3, 2016

  • Oregon militiamen wanted to 'take back federal land'
    A group of protesters and purported militiamen occupied a federal building at an Oregon wildlife refuge late Saturday and vowed to stay there indefinitely to highlight rancher rights. Amelia Templeton, a reporter for Oregon Public Broadcasting, joins Hari Sreenivasan on the phone from Burns, Oregon, for more details.
    Original Air Date: January 3, 2016
    Screen Shot 2016-01-03 at 6.00.02 PM
  • 'Downton Abbey' actors dish on their characters
    "Downton Abbey," the highly watched award-winning PBS drama, begins its sixth and final season Sunday. Before they say farewell, some of the cast members discuss the evolution of their characters over the years.
    Original Air Date: January 3, 2016
    NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 07:  (L-R) Allen Leech, Elizabeth McGovern, Hugh Bonneville, Michelle Dockery, Jim Carter, Phyllis Logan and Kevin Doyle attend "Downton Abbey" series season six premiere at Millenium Hotel on December 7, 2015 in New York City.  (Photo by Rob Kim/Getty Images)
  • Protests rage after Saudi Arabia's executes Shiite cleric
    Iran’s Supreme Leader warned on Sunday there would be divine retribution for Saudi Arabia’s rulers after the execution of a renowned Shiite cleric, as Iranian protesters ransacked the Saudi Embassy in Tehran in outrage. Liz Sly of The Washington Post joins Hari Sreenivasan via Skype from Beirut.
    Original Air Date: January 3, 2016
    People protest in front of Saudi Arabia's embassy during a demonstration in Tehran January 2, 2016. Iranian protesters stormed the Saudi Embassy in Tehran early on Sunday morning as Shi'ite Muslim Iran reacted with fury to Saudi Arabia's execution of a prominent Shi'ite cleric. REUTERS/TIMA/Mehdi Ghasemi/ISNA ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, CONTENT, LOCATION OR DATE OF THIS IMAGE. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. NOT FOR USE BY REUTERS THIRD PARTY DISTRIBUTORS. THIS PICTURE IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS    - RTX20U1H
  • Rural hospitals perform more surgeries -- but risks are high
    An investigation by The Wall Street Journal found that surgeries performed at so-called critical access hospitals in mostly rural areas carry a greater risk of complications than those at general hospitals. And financial incentives lead the small facilities to perform more surgeries. Christopher Weaver joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the findings.
    Original Air Date: January 3, 2016
    Measuring for implant during orthopedic surgery
  • Oregon invests in the next generation of blue collar workers
    Over the next decade, economists and business leaders say America faces a shortage of millions of skilled workers for blue collar jobs as Baby Boomers retire. Now, Oregon is planning ahead by ramping up efforts to train Generation X'ers and Millennials to fill middle-skill job openings in technical fields. NewsHour's Christopher Booker reports.
    Original Air Date: January 3, 2016
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Saturday, January 2, 2016

  • Bad bargain? Mobile homeowners feel financial strain
    Twenty million Americans live in mobile, or manufactured, homes that offer affordable housing, particularly in rural parts of the country. Typically older and poorer than traditional homeowners, manufactured homeowners often face serious, unique financial difficulties that make it a bad bargain for some low-income Americans. NewsHour's Stephen Fee reports.
    Original Air Date: January 2, 2016
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  • What's in store for Congress in 2016?
    As President Obama enters the last full year of his presidency, he'll have to contend with a sixth straight year of working with a Republican-led Congress over key conflict points, such as Obamacare, the war on Islamic terrorism, Guantanamo Bay, and Syrian refugees. With a look ahead at 2016 on Capitol Hill, NewsHour Political Director Lisa Desjardins joins Hari Sreenivasan
    Original Air Date: January 2, 2016
    Congress passed several major bills in 2016, despite continue partisanship and a leadership shakeup in the House. Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images
  • Invasive crayfish threaten species in Oregon's Crater Lake
    At Crater Lake National Park in Oregon, the site of the deepest lake in the country, the surface water temperature has been heating in recent years, attracting an invasive species of crayfish that is putting the lake’s clarity and native creatures in jeopardy. Correspondent Jes Burns of Oregon Public Broadcasting and EarthFix reports.
    Original Air Date: January 2, 2016
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Friday, January 1, 2016

  • What starts the story for this National Book Award winner
    "Fortune Smiles," a collection of stories by Adam Johnson, was the winner of this year's National Book Award for fiction. He joined Jeffrey Brown at the Miami Book Fair to discuss what inspires his stories.
    Original Air Date: January 1, 2016
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  • Shields and Gerson on the biggest political moments of 2015
    Shields and Gerson on the biggest political moments of 2015 Blurb: Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and Washington Post columnist Michael Gerson join Judy Woodruff to review the year in political news and to look ahead to 2016.
    Original Air Date: January 1, 2016
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  • Daily airstrikes, specter of ISIS loom over Aleppo civilians
    The plight of refugees fleeing the war in Syria has been well documented across the last year, but what is life like for those who stayed behind? Jeffrey Brown talks to journalist and activist Rami Jarrah about how civilians are living in Aleppo.
    Original Air Date: January 1, 2016
    Boys play at a school's playground as one of them sits in front of a wall painted with an opposition flag in the rebel-controlled area of Aleppo's Seif al-Dawla, Syria October 25, 2015. REUTERS/Hosam Katan      EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVE - RTX1T67Z
  • What signal is Iran sending with recent missile tests?
    The landmark Iran nuclear accord is soon due to be implemented fully, but renewed tensions between that country and the U.S. could affect the deal. The U.N. has said that recent ballistic missile tests violate prohibitions, prompting possible sanctions by the Obama administration. Judy Woodruff talks to Karim Sadjadpour of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
    Original Air Date: January 1, 2016
    An Iranian Emad rocket is launched as it is tested at an undisclosed location October 11, 2015.  REUTERS/farsnews.com/Handout via Reuters ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, CONTENT, LOCATION OR DATE OF THIS IMAGE. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVE. THIS PICTURE IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS.      TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY      - RTX1YTIZ
  • 2015: a year in mass shootings
    News reports from the scenes of mass shootings in the U.S. were all too familiar in 2015. In total, there were 372 mass shootings in the United States last year, as of the morning of Dec. 31. These shootings, quantified by the website MassShootingTracker.org as involving four or more people, killed 475 people and wounded 1,870.
    Original Air Date: January 1, 2016
    Mourners hug after praying outside the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina June 18, 2015, a day after a mass shooting left nine dead during a bible study at the church.  REUTERS/Brian Snyder - RTX1H60G

Thursday, December 31, 2015

  • Critics share films you shouldn’t miss from 2015
    What was the best movie of the year? The best performance of the year? The most under appreciated film of the year? Jeffrey Brown talks to Ann Hornaday of The Washington Post and Mike Sargent of Pacifica Radio.
    Original Air Date: December 31, 2015
    Emory Cohen as "Tony" and Saoirse Ronan as "Eilis" in BROOKLYN. Photo courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures. © 2015 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation All Rights Reserved
  • What’s next for communities devastated by Mo. flooding?
    In Missouri, site of devastating flooding along the Mississippi River and its tributaries, communities are starting to get some relief from the rising waters, but the disaster is far from over. Gwen Ifill gets an update from Cindy Erickson of the American Red Cross of Eastern Missouri and Scott Barthelmass of the Eureka Fire Protection District.
    Original Air Date: December 31, 2015
    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hydro technician Jason Carron assesses the Mississippi River flood waters in St. Louis, Missouri December 31, 2015.  Missouri and Illinois were bracing for more flooding on Thursday as rain-swollen rivers, some at record heights, overflowed their banks, washing out hundreds of structures and leaving thousands of people displaced from their homes.  REUTERS/Kate Munsch - RTX20O4V
  • 2015: a year in mass shootings
    In total, there were 372 mass shootings in the United States this year, as of the morning of Dec. 31. These events, quantified by the website MassShootingTracker.org as injuring or killing four or more people, killed 475 people and wounded 1,870.
    Original Air Date: December 31, 2015
    Mourners hug after praying outside the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina June 18, 2015, a day after a mass shooting left nine dead during a bible study at the church.  REUTERS/Brian Snyder - RTX1H60G
    December 31, 2015

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

  • Why we shouldn’t let the food industry dictate our diets
    Michael Pollan's bestselling book "In Defense of Food" was a call to arms for making real food a bigger part of Americans' diets. Now he takes that push to PBS with a new documentary. He joins Jeffrey Brown to discuss why we’ve lost the true definition of food and how to take back control from the food industry.
    Original Air Date: December 30, 2015
    Whole Foods grocery store worker Tim Owen trims the tops of organic carrots in the produce section of the store in Ann Arbor, Michigan, March 8, 2012. Photo by Rebecca Cook/Reuters
  • 2015's biggest breakthrough could deliver designer babies
    CRISPR, a new method for editing genes, has been called a development that could revolutionize medicine. Cheaper and more precise than past gene editing, this promising tool has also raised concerns. Gwen Ifill talks to Jennifer Doudna of University of California, Berkeley and Paul Knoepfler of University of California, Davis.
    Original Air Date: December 30, 2015
    Should we edit . Illustration by Getty Images
  • How Congress found a way to agree in 2015
    Congress ended 2015 on an unusually productive note. A $1 trillion compromise passed with a majority of both Democrats and Republicans, and problems that lawmakers had kicked down the road year after year finally made it into law. Political director Lisa Desjardins takes a look back.
    Original Air Date: December 30, 2015
    (L-R) Republican Senate leaders Tom Barrasso (R-WY), John Thune (R-SD), Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and John Cornyn (R-TX) hold a news conference on budget negotiations on Capitol Hill in Washington December 15, 2015.     REUTERS/Gary Cameron          TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY      - RTX1YUAP
  • Did the U.S. spy on Israel amid Iran deal lobbying?
    The rift between the U.S. and Israel over the Iran deal was no secret, but according to The Wall Street Journal, that dispute was fed by high stakes political espionage by both countries and ensnared members of Congress. Adam Entous of The Wall Street Journal discusses the story with Gwen Ifill.
    Original Air Date: December 30, 2015
    U.S. President Barack Obama (R) meets with Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House in Washington October 1,  2014.     REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  • Cosby’s own words helped prosecutors build sex assault case
    Comedian Bill Cosby has been charged with sexual assault in connection to allegations that he drugged and fondled Andrea Constand in 2004. That comes after dozens of accusations made by other women. William Brangham learns more from Maryclaire Dale of the Associated Press.
    Original Air Date: December 30, 2015
    Actor and comedian Bill Cosby (C) arrives with attorney Monique Pressley (R) for his arraignment on sexual assault charges at the Montgomery County Courthouse in Elkins Park, Pennsylvania on Dec. 30, 2015. George Washington University announced Monday that it was rescinding an honorary doctoral degree that was given to Cosby in the 1990s. Photo by Mark Makela

Tuesday, December 29, 2015

  • Poet evokes the black female form across history
    "Voyage of the Sable Venus," the first collection from Robin Coste Lewis, is the winner of this year's National Book Award for poetry. Lewis discussed her debut, her readers and her influences with Jeffrey Brown at the Miami Book Festival.
    Original Air Date: December 29, 2015
    Robin Coste Lewis
  • How Puerto Rico is coping with the worst drought in decades
    The tropical island of Puerto Rico has been scrambling for a precious resource: clean, fresh water. Puerto Ricans have faced the worst drought in more than 20 years and the most stringent water rationing ever imposed. Special correspondent Chris Bury reports.
    Original Air Date: December 29, 2015
    A dead fish lies on the dry shores of the almost empty La Plata reservoir in Toa Alta, Puerto Rico, June 20, 2015. A drought due to subnormal rainfall in several areas has forced the local government to interrupt water supply on several days of the week in most of the metropolitan area of San Juan, affecting over 400,000 homes and businesses, according to local media. Picture taken June 20, 2015. REUTERS/Alvin Baez-Hernandez  - RTX1HI5L
  • Will a new cybersecurity law make us safer?
    Folded into the massive spending and tax cut bill was a significant and controversial new law on cybersecurity. The act encourages private companies to share data about hacks with the government, but it's raising questions among security advocates and privacy groups alike. Jeffrey Brown talks to James Lewis of the Center for Strategic and International Studies and Elissa Shevinsky of JeKuDo.
    Original Air Date: December 29, 2015
    An illustration picture shows a projection of binary code on a man holding a laptop computer, in an office in Warsaw June 24, 2013. REUTERS/Kacper Pempel (POLAND - Tags: BUSINESS TELECOMS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) - RTX10ZB5

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