Monday, September 26, 2016

  • What Clinton and Trump want from the first debate
    As Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton prepare to take the stage for their first debate, we ask their campaigns about their strategies. Gwen Ifill talks to Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook and Judy Woodruff talks to Trump senior advisor Jack Kingston.
    Original Air Date: September 26, 2016
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  • First debate predictions in an unpredictable election year
    Amy Walter of the The Cook Political Report, syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff for some pre-debate analysis. They discuss what each candidate is hoping to accomplish: for Hillary Clinton it is showcasing her opponent’s temperament and judgement, and for Donald Trump it’s speaking about shaking up the status quo.
    Original Air Date: September 26, 2016
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Sunday, September 25, 2016

  • What to expect from the first presidential debate
    As U.S. presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton prepare for their first debate on Monday night, NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Jeff Greenfield joins Hari Sreenivasan in New York to discuss what to expect.
    Original Air Date: September 25, 2016
    Hostra University students playing the roles of the candidates and moderator go through a rehearsal for the first U.S. presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York September 25, 2016. Left to right are Joseph Burch, Christian Stewart and Caroline Mullen.  REUTERS/Rick Wilking - RTSPCT5
  • Questions remain after Charlotte police release videos
    The attorney representing the family of Keith Scott says videos released Saturday show he was not acting aggressively when police fatally shot him last week in Charlotte, North Carolina. Police Chief Kerr Putney said he released the videos in the interest of transparency. Carla Shedd, an assistant professor of sociology and African-American studies at Columbia University, joins Hari Sreenivasan.
    Original Air Date: September 25, 2016
    Protesters march during another night of protests over the police shooting of Keith Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S. September 24, 2016.  REUTERS/Mike Blake - RTSPAOC
  • This company raised minimum wage to $70,000 -- and it helped business
    In 2015, Gravity Payments CEO Dan Price announced he would raise the company’s minimum wage to $70,000 a year by 2017and slash his own compensation by more than 90 percent. More than a year later, Price reports the company's revenue and clientele has grown substantially, despite critics' predictions that the move would be bad for business. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent John Larson reports.
    Original Air Date: September 25, 2016
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Saturday, September 24, 2016

  • How do police decide when to release video footage?
    In Charlotte, North Carolina, police announced Saturday they would release body cam and dash cam footage from the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. Dozens of U.S. cities have started equipping their police with body cameras, including Charlotte -- but that footage is not always released to the public. National reporter for the Washington Post Wesley Lowery joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss.
    Original Air Date: September 24, 2016
    Marchers protest the police shooting of Keith Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S., September, 24, 2016. REUTERS/Jason Miczek - RTSPA6K
  • North Carolina and Maryland challenge gerrymandering
    Gerrymandering -- the practice of drawing districts to benefit one political party over another or to protect an incumbent -- has a long history in the U.S. Special Correspondent Jeff Greenfield reports on reform efforts in Maryland, where one district has been called a “broken-winged pterodactyl,” and in North Carolina, where litigation is challenging partisan redistricting.
    Original Air Date: September 24, 2016
    An example of gerrymandering in Maryland's 3rd congressional district. Photo by PBS NewsHour Weekend
  • Architect on African American History Museum’s unique exterior
    Architect Philip Freelon talks about how light affects the National Museum of African American History and Culture, which opened on Saturday on the National Mall. While other structures on the Mall are made of marble, granite or concrete, the museum’s unique design means it changes appearance depending on the time of day.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
    The Washington Monument rises behind the National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in Washington September 14, 2016. The museum is holding a media preview today ahead of its opening day on September 24.  REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque - RTSNPZJ

Friday, September 23, 2016

  • Using an ancient Greek tragedy to face trauma in Ferguson​
    In the Greek tragedy “Antigone,” the title character is told that she cannot bury her brother, who has been killed. Echoes of the classical work rang out in 2014, when Michael Brown was shot by police and left dead in the street for hours. New York-based group Outside the Wire presents “Antigone in Ferguson,” a pertinent take on Sophocles that’s encouraging discussion. Jeffrey Brown reports.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
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  • Shields and Brooks on transparency in police shootings
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s news, including police shootings in Charlotte and Tulsa, the newly released video showing the fatal shooting of Keith Scott, the candidates’ views on police violence and recent protests and what we should expect from the first presidential debate.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
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  • FARC holds final summit as an armed rebel group
    On Monday, Colombia will sign a peace accord, ending more than 50 years of war. The deal, if approved by public referendum, ends the insurgency by the guerilla group known as the FARC, which will begin to transition into a political group. Hari Sreenivasan talks to special correspondent Nadja Drost, who has been witness to the FARC’s final conference all week long.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
    Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) commander Ivan Marquez and members of the leadership attend a news conference at the camp where they prepare to ratify a peace deal with the Colombian government, near El Diamante in Yari Plains, Colombia, September 23, 2016.  REUTERS/John Vizcaino - RTSP66T
  • What President Hillary Clinton would do on Day 1
    With the election just six weeks away, we can begin to imagine what the candidates would actually do if they reach the Oval Office. What would Hillary Clinton propose and get done in the first days of her presidency? Lisa Desjardins and Amie Parnes, co-author of “HRC,” join John Yang to discuss Clinton’s proposals for infrastructure and immigration and her plans for the Supreme Court.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
    REFILE-QUALITY REPEATU.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton reads a piece of paper as she flies back to White Plains, after attending a campaign event in Orlando Florida, U.S. September 21, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria - RTSOVCR
  • Carl Reiner on being a comedian and Mel Brooks’ best friend
    Carl Reiner never thought about going into comedy growing up. That was until he met Mel Brooks. A friendship that started in 1961 with The “2,000-Year-Old Man” skit, the two close friends now have a nightly movie date. Reiner gives his Brief but Spectacular take on his comedic career.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
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Thursday, September 22, 2016

  • The fate of ACA hinges on who wins in November
    One big issue at stake in this election is President Obama’s signature domestic achievement: the Affordable Care Act. While Hillary Clinton wants to preserve and expand the law, Donald Trump would replace it with smaller measures to lower costs. From Arizona, special correspondent Sarah Varney speaks with residents about what they would like to see in future health care policy.
    Original Air Date: September 22, 2016
    The federal government forms for applying for health coverage are seen at a rally held by supporters of the Affordable Care Act in Jackson, Mississippi, in 2013. Photo by Jonathan Bachman/Reuters
  • The psychological trick behind getting people to say yes
    Asking for someone’s phone number in front of a flower shop will be more successful because the flowers prime us to think about romance. Small, subliminal cues change our willingness to be sold on a product, on ideas or even a date. Economics correspondent Paul Solman speaks with psychology professor Robert Cialdini about his book, “Pre-Suasion,” the crucial step before persuasion.
    Original Air Date: September 22, 2016
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  • Trump offers take on Charlotte protests
    Donald Trump commented on the unrest in Charlotte, saying protests would most hurt African-American residents. He also touted his law-and-order agenda as a benefit to black Americans. Also, 75 retired U.S. diplomats wrote a letter saying Trump is “entirely unqualified to serve as president.” John Yang reports.
    Original Air Date: September 22, 2016
    Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump delivers remarks at the Shale Insight energy conference in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S. September 22, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst - RTSOZT1
  • What President Donald Trump would do on Day 1
    With the election just six weeks away, we can begin to imagine what the candidates would actually do if they reach the Oval Office. What a Donald Trump presidency would look like from Day 1? Judy Woodruff learns more from Politico’s Seung Min Kim and The New Yorker’s Evan Osnos.
    Original Air Date: September 22, 2016
    Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump delivers remarks at the Shale Insight energy conference in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S. September 22, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst - RTSOZRV
  • The state of safety and civil rights for black Americans
    Charlotte and Tulsa are the most recent in a long list of cities that have mourned and protested deadly police shootings against black Americans. Gwen Ifill speaks with author and activist Andre Perry, Rashad Robinson, executive director of Color of Change, and Vanessa De Luca, editor-in-chief of Essence Magazine about what these acts of violence suggest about life in the black community today.
    Original Air Date: September 22, 2016
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Wednesday, September 21, 2016

  • News Wrap: Fed will keep key interest rate near record lows
    In our news wrap Wednesday, the Federal Reserve said it will hold on keeping a key, short-term interest rate near record lows. Chair Janet Yellen suggested a hike was likely before year’s end. Also, the crisis in Syria took center stage at the U.N. Security Council. Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov denied Russian responsibility for Monday’s deadly attack on an aid convoy.
    Original Air Date: September 21, 2016
    United States Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen holds a news conference following the two-day Federal Open Market Committee meeting in Washington, U.S., September 21, 2016.          REUTERS/Gary Cameron     TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSOU1R
  • Protests flare after a police shooting in Charlotte
    Protests boiled over in Charlotte, North Carolina, within hours of the fatal shooting of 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott. His sister said he was unarmed, but the officers say he did have a gun. William Brangham reports on the ensuing turmoil.
    Original Air Date: September 21, 2016
    Police officers wearing riot gear block a road during protests after police fatally shot Keith Lamont Scott in the parking lot of an apartment complex in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S. September 20, 2016. REUTERS/Adam Rhew/Charlotte Magazine   MANDATORY CREDIT. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES. - RTSOP7L
  • Charlotte mayor promises investigation of highest integrity
    The city of Charlotte, North Carolina, is on edge in the wake of a police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott and the violent protests that followed overnight. Judy Woodruff speaks with Mayor Jennifer Roberts about unrest in the community and getting facts about the deadly confrontation.
    Original Air Date: September 21, 2016
    Charlotte's Mayor Jennifer Roberts speaks to reporters the morning after protests against the police shooting of Keith Scott, in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S. September 21, 2016. REUTERS/Jason Miczek - RTSOT28
  • Candidates weigh in on race and policing after new shootings
    Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton weighed in on news of recent deadly police shootings in Oklahoma and North Carolina. John Yang reports on their reactions, plus a look at new fundraising numbers.
    Original Air Date: September 21, 2016
    Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign event at the Frontline Outreach and Youth Center in Orlando, Florida. Photo by Carlos Barria/Reuters
  • Gary Johnson on the rules keeping him off the debate stage
    Former governor and Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson is polling the highest of third-party candidates, although he did not qualify for the upcoming first debate. He speaks with Gwen Ifill about what he sees as unfair election polling, how he would do away with the “added layer of bureaucracy” that is the Department of Homeland Security and the Black Lives Matter movement.
    Original Air Date: September 21, 2016
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  • Could Trump's foreign dealings pose conflicts of interest?
    Donald Trump has been engaged in business deals with companies on nearly every continent, but it is often unclear who’s behind these companies and if they are doing business legally. Judy Woodruff speaks with Newsweek’s Kurt Eichenwald, who says the list of Donald Trump’s extensive global business dealings and potential conflicts of interest goes on and on.
    Original Air Date: September 21, 2016
    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a news conference, as he is watched by two pipers in front of the lighthouse, at his Turnberry golf course, in Turnberry, Scotland, Britain June 24, 2016.      REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne - RTX2HZU0
  • How robots are joining the police force
    In light of the recent bombings in New York and New Jersey, science correspondent Miles O'Brien takes a look at a new technology that is increasingly being used by law enforcement: bomb-disarming robots. Operated from a safe distance, these robots can blast through car windows and even kill, raising ethical issues about how they should be used.
    Original Air Date: September 21, 2016
    A Cleveland police bomb squad technician loads a Remotec F5A explosive ordnance device robot during a demonstration of police capabilities near the site of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 14, 2016.  REUTERS/Rick Wilking - RTSHXME
  • Why we believe what we read on the internet
    In the digital age, we have access to all the information that we could ever want. But that means there’s also a lot of misinformation out there. How do we know what’s true and what isn’t? That’s what Daniel Levitin attempts to teach readers of his new book, “A Field Guide to Lies.” Jeffrey Brown sits down with Levitin to learn how we can sift through the digital field of information.
    Original Air Date: September 21, 2016
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  • New museum tells America’s story via African-American lens
    One hundred years in the making, the National Museum of African American History and Culture will open on Saturday in Washington. The museum presents history through objects both celebratory and sobering -- showcasing everything from Michael Jackson’s fedora to a pair of shackles discovered aboard a sunken slave ship. Gwen Ifill tours the exhibitions and speaks with the people responsible.
    Original Air Date: September 21, 2016
    A woman passes a display depicting the Mexico Olympic protest during a media preview at the National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in Washington, U.S., September 14, 2016. The museum will open to the public on September 24. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque    FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES. - RTSNR10

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

  • News Wrap: FBI investigated NY-area bombing suspect in 2014
    In our news wrap Tuesday, The New York Times reported that the FBI briefly investigated Ahmad Khan Rahami, the suspect in the New York and New Jersey bombings, in 2014, after he allegedly stabbed his brother. Also, French authorities have made eight new arrests in connection to the Bastille Day truck attack that killed 86.
    Original Air Date: September 20, 2016
    Ahmad Khan Rahami, 28, is shown in Union County, New Jersey, U.S. Prosecutor?s Office photo released on September 19, 2016.  Courtesy Union County Prosecutor?s Office/Handout via REUTERS  ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY - RTSOM2P

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