Monday, April 14, 2014

  • Inside Myanmar’s transition from isolation to openness
    Myanmar, rocked by civil strife, has been kept isolated from the world for more than half a century. In recent years, however, the government has been proposing democratic reform and peace treaties with ethnic groups, prompting the U.S. to lift most sanctions. But how does a country move from being closed to open society, and who is to gain? Jeffrey Brown reports from Myanmar.
    Original Air Date: April 14, 2014
    MYANMAR-POLITICS-CENSUS
  • Feds classify Kansas shootings as hate crimes
    Federal authorities confirmed that they believe shootings at two Jewish community sites in Kansas were motivated by hate. Gwen Ifill talks to Mark Potok of the Southern Poverty Law Center to learn more about the 73-year-old suspect, Frazier Glenn Cross, who faces first-degree murder charges for the deaths of three people.
    Original Air Date: April 14, 2014
    kansas_hatecrime
  • Paul Muldoon reads ‘A Civil War Suite’
    Paul Muldoon reads part five of his poem “A Civil War Suite” at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C.
    Original Air Date: April 14, 2014
    Paul Muldoon reads ‘A Civil War Suite’

Sunday, April 13, 2014

  • Ukraine orders action against separatist revolt
    On Sunday, the Ukrainian crisis escalated as government forces took on pro-Russian secessionists with reports of causalities on both sides. For more about this intensifying crisis, Peter Leonard of the Associated Press joined Hari Sreenivasan from Donetsk, Ukraine via Skype.
    Original Air Date: April 13, 2014
    Pro-Russian armed men stand guard while pro-Russian protesters gather near the police headquarters in Slaviansk
  • Solar-powered plane revealed in Switzerland
    Following 12 years of research and testing, designers and pilots Bertrand Piccard and Andre Borschberg debuted a huge solar-powered plane in Switzerland this week. The plane, which boasts a wingspan winder than a 747's, is covered in more than 17,000 solar cells. Hari Sreenivasan reports.
    Original Air Date: April 13, 2014
    solar
  • Papyrus referencing Jesus’ wife dates back to ancient times
    Papyrus referencing Jesus’ wife dates back to ancient times Experts at Columbia, MIT and Harvard have concluded through scientific testing that a small papyrus fragment that quotes Jesus making references to “my wife,” is in fact from ancient times. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with Michael Peppard, a theology professor at Fordham University, about the religious ramifications of this discovery.
    Original Air Date: April 13, 2014
    interview
  • Controversial facility works to curb H.I.V. spread
    British Columbia has successfully stemmed an epidemic of AIDS in one of the hardest to reach populations: intravenous drug addicts. Correspondent William Brangham examines the ways that medical professionals are taking on the spread of H.I.V, including a look inside a controversial facility where nurses help drug addicts inject illegal drugs.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
    Addiction in Vancouver

Saturday, April 12, 2014

  • Walmart to cut prices on some organic products
    Organic food sales totaled some $30 billion dollars in the U.S. last year. Earlier this week, the nation’s largest retailer, Walmart, announced that it would slash prices of some of its organic products by 25 percent. Hari Sreenivasan talks with Phil Wahba who covers the retail industry for Reuters about the effects this will have on consumers, retailers and food makers.
    Original Air Date: April 12, 2014
    interviewgrab[1]
  • Without funds to pay fines, minor incidents can mean jail
    Increasingly, cities are turning to what are known as private probation companies to collect unpaid fines. In turn, are people ending up in jail because they can't afford to pay fines? Special correspondent John Carlos Frey takes an in-depth look at what some are calling the return of the debtor's prison.
    Original Air Date: April 9, 2014
    jailtime

Friday, April 11, 2014

  • How poetry advanced the civil rights movement
    U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey and Jeffrey Brown recently traveled from Mississippi to Alabama on a pilgrimage to witness the historical struggles and sorrows people faced during the civil rights movement. On their 100-mile journey, they examine the role of poetry in advancing the movement's message for justice and freedom.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
    poet
  • UN commissioner: refugee crises need more international aid
    War has upended the lives of millions in Syria and a never-ending humanitarian crisis. Aid groups attempt to meet basic needs of refugees and internally displaced Syrians but face a massive shortfall in finances. Judy Woodruff talks to U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres about the need for increased political and financial commitments in Syria, as well as CAR and South Sudan.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
    refugees
  • Shields and Brooks on Sebelius' legacy, Civil Rights Act
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss this week’s news, including the resignation of Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius and the trouble with healthcare.gov rollout that defined her tenure, the anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, and potential candidates for the 2016 presidential election.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
    shieldsbrooks
  • Has the market rally in biotech stocks hit a wall?
    Thursday marked the single worst day for the Nasdaq since 2011. The once high-flying biotech and Internet shares tumbled, pulling the index below 4000 on Friday for the first time since Feb. 3. Hari Sreenivasan talks to Hugh Johnson of Hugh Johnson Advisors about what's behind investors' jitters and why tech and biotech tend to be more volatile than other stocks.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
    Markets Continue Downward Slide As Trading Opens
  • Why states are beginning to drop Common Core standards
    Oklahoma has become the latest state to move toward repealing the Common Core national education standards. Once the subject of bipartisan support, the standards are facing criticism from the left and right. Jeffrey Brown gets two views on the potential repeal from Oklahoma State Representatives Jason Nelson (R) and Emily Virgin (D).
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
    commoncore
  • U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey reads 'Miscegenation'
    U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey reads "Miscegenation" while in Jackson, Mississippi.For more Art Beat: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/topic/arts/
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
    U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey reads her poem 'Miscegenation'
  • U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey reads 'Incident'
    U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey reads her poem "Incident," while in Jackson, Mississippi.For more Art Beat: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/topic/arts/
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
    U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey reads her poem "Incident"
  • Jerry Mitchell on the Congressional Civil Rights Pilgrimage
    During the annual Congressional Civil Rights Pilgrimage, investigative reporter at The Clarion-Ledger Jerry Mitchell speaks about the important of returning to the house where Medgar Evers was killed.For more Art Beat: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/topic/arts/
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
    Medgar Evers home
  • Mylie Evers at the Congressional Civil Rights Pilgrimage
    During the annual Congressional Civil Rights Pilgrimage, Myrlie Evers speaks to the crowd in front of the house where Medgar Evers was killed.For more Art Beat: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/topic/arts/
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
    Myrlie Evers tells how her husband Medgar Evers was shot at their home in Jackson, Mississippi. She spoke during the annual Congressional Civil Rights Pilgrimage.
  • Obama names budget chief his choice of successor for Sebelius
    President Barack Obama praised outgoing Health and Human Secretary Kathleen Sebelius for helping to steer his health care law's comeback after a rocky rollout, even as he nominated a successor aimed at helping the White House move past the political damage.
    Original Air Date: April 11, 2014
    President Barack Obama announced Friday that Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius will step down from her post; his choice for a successor is his budget chief, Sylvia Mathews Burwell. Video still by PBS NewsHour

Thursday, April 10, 2014

  • Justice Dept. accuses Albuquerque PD of ‘unjustified force’
    The U.S. Justice Department released a scathing report on its findings of a pattern of “unjustified force” by the Albuquerque Police Department in New Mexico. The report offers details on 23 fatal shootings since 2010, including the March shooting of James Boyd, a 38-year-old homeless man with a history of mental illness. Jeffrey Brown talks to Gene Grant of KNME for more insight.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2014
    New Mexico Scenics
  • Why six years of high school might pay off in the workforce
    At Pathways in Technology Early College High School in Brooklyn, N.Y., students are expected to attend for six years, earning both a high school diploma and a two-year Associate’s degree. P-TECH and other schools based on the same model aim to give students from low-income families a head start on college with free, career-oriented coursework. Hari Sreenivasan tells the story.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2014
    ptech2
  • UN initiative aims to put 57 million kids in school
    There are 200 million children worldwide who do not attend school. A new U.N. initiative led by former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown aims to get 57 million more children into school by the end of 2015. Judy Woodruff interviews Brown, now a U.N. special envoy for Global Education, about overcoming ingrained social practices around the globe and mobilizing the children themselves.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2014
    accesstoeducation
  • How the Civil Rights Act opened a door to the American dream
    President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act into law 50 years ago. Gwen Ifill examines its legacy and unfinished business with President Johnson’s daughter, Lynda Johnson Robb, Shirley Franklin, the former mayor of Atlanta, Ranjana Natarajan of the University of Texas School of Law, and former House Republican aide Robert Kimball.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2014
    276-10-WH64
  • The presidential pen stroke that outlawed discrimination
    Half a century ago, Lyndon B. Johnson signed landmark legislation outlawing discrimination based on race, ethnicity and sex. At a summit honoring this chapter of Johnson’s legacy, President Obama applauded the Civil Rights Act of 1964 for opening doors of opportunity for himself and other Americans, while former Presidents Clinton and Carter cautioned that challenges remain. Gwen Ifill reports.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2014
    civilrights1
  • Gordon Brown on guaranteeing education for refugee children
    Judy Woodruff talks with Gordon Brown, the former U.K. prime minister who is now the United Nations' special envoy for global education about efforts to educate Syrian refugee children in Lebanon. Watch that part of the interview now to hear how Brown thinks the plan to share Lebanese school buildings could revolutionize education for refugees around the world.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2014
    Former U.K. Prime Minister Gordon Brown Discusses educating Syrian refugees living in Lebanon.
  • Mavis Staples sings 'We Shall Overcome'
    Mavis Staples appeared on stage Thursday to sing "We Shall Overcome." Her performance was part of a Civil Rights Summit on Thursday to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act.
    Original Air Date: April 10, 2014

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

  • Echoes from Marian Anderson’s defiant performance
    Marian Anderson, the legendary African-American contralto, sang at the Lincoln Memorial exactly 75 years ago after she was refused a performance at Washington’s Constitution Hall. On Wednesday, young people gathered to commemorate Anderson’s effort to strike out against racism through the power and beauty of her voice. Jeffrey Brown reports.
    Original Air Date: April 9, 2014
    MARIAN_ANDERSON_singing
  • Drugs used in lethal injections come under scrutiny
    As foreign supplies have dwindled, traditional lethal injection drugs are being replaced with others manufactured in the U.S. But inmates and lawyers are questioning whether these new drugs will result in death without undue pain and suffering. Gwen Ifill takes a closer look at the issue with Megan McCracken of the University of California, Berkeley and Joel Zivot of Emory University.
    Original Air Date: April 9, 2014
    LETHALINJECTION

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