Tuesday, October 4, 2016

  • What Pence and Kaine need to do in their only VP face-off
    On Tuesday night, Sen. Tim Kaine and Gov. Mike Pence will take the spotlight in their only face-off this election season. For analysis on what they need to accomplish and avoid, Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff speak with syndicated columnist Mark Shields, The Washington Post’s Michael Gerson and Amy Walter of the The Cook Political Report.
    Original Air Date: October 4, 2016
  • Educators upset over Oklahoma’s schools run for office
    Oklahoma ranks 45 out of 50 states in spending per student. It’s home to overcrowded classrooms and more than 100 districts that have approved four-day school weeks. Now, more than 40 teachers who are tired of not being heard are trying to change things themselves -- by running for office. Special correspondent Lisa Start of Education Week reports.
    Original Air Date: October 4, 2016
  • How the VP nominees are preparing to boost their campaigns
    Tonight, vice presidential nominees Sen. Tim Kaine and Gov. Mike Pence will meet to debate at Longwood University in Virginia. Lisa Desjardins offers a look at debate preparations and Gwen Ifill talks to Matt Schlapp, chair of the American Conservative Union, while Judy Woodruff talks to Donna Brazile, interim chair of the Democratic National Committee.
    Original Air Date: October 4, 2016

Monday, October 3, 2016

  • What to expect in a Pence-Kaine debate showdown
    The vice presidential debate is just one day away. What’s at stake as the second-in-line candidates take the national stage? Also, how will recent revelations about Donald Trump’s taxes and comments on women affect the polls? And what do Hillary Clinton’s chances look like with younger voters? Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report and NPR’s Tamara Keith join Judy Woodruff to discuss.
    Original Air Date: October 3, 2016
  • Clinton campaign pounces on Trump controversies
    Over the weekend, The New York Times reported that Donald Trump may have been able to legally avoid paying federal income taxes for 18 years. The candidate is also under fire for allegations about his treatment of women behind the scenes of “The Apprentice,” and the legal registration of his charitable organization. John Yang reports on how the Clinton campaign is responding.
    Original Air Date: October 3, 2016
  • Complicated coalition joins forces to drive ISIS from Mosul
    Two years ago, Islamic State troops stormed Mosul, Iraq. Today the city is the militant group’s last remaining urban base in the country, but Iraqi forces, backed by the U.S. and others, are preparing to drive them out. Special correspondent Jane Ferguson reports from Qayarah, Iraq, in partnership with Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.
    Original Air Date: October 3, 2016
  • Could Senate control ride on this tight New Hampshire race?
    In New Hampshire, a high-profile contest is drawing outsized attention and outside money due to its stakes in shaping the Senate. Republican incumbent Sen. Kelly Ayotte and Democratic Gov. Maggie Hassan, both well-respected and popular political figures in their state, are running a neck-and-neck race while keeping the presidential candidates at an arm’s length. Lisa Desjardins reports.
    Original Air Date: October 3, 2016
  • What you need to know about Tim Kaine and Mike Pence
    Sen. Tim Kaine and Gov. Mike Pence have radically different ideologies, but grew up under strikingly similar circumstances. What led them to the national stage? With the first vice presidential debate a day away, Judy Woodruff takes a look at the lives and careers of the candidates who will be second-in-line to the presidency.
    Original Air Date: October 3, 2016

Sunday, October 2, 2016

  • Can DNA tests help with ruptures from transatlantic slavery?
    Alondra Nelson has followed how African-Americans are using DNA tests to help answer questions about their identities that were lost during the transatlantic slave trade. Her book, "The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations and Reconciliation After the Genome," chronicles their experiences. She joined Hari Sreenivasan to discuss.
    Original Air Date: October 2, 2016
  • What do Florida voters want from a president?
    With 29 electoral votes, the swing state of Florida has drawn the attention of both presidential candidates, who are trying to determine the most important issues for the state’s diverse electorate. Susan MacManus, a political science professor at the University of South Florida, joins Hari Sreenivasan.
    Original Air Date: October 2, 2016
  • Shifting Latino vote in Florida could influence election
    The battleground state of Florida is again considered an influential toss-up in this year's presidential election. One constituency there is getting a lot of attention from both candidates: Latino voters that have flooded into central Florida during the last decade, creating a potential swing area. NewsHour Weekend Correspondent Ivette Feliciano reports.
    Original Air Date: October 2, 2016
  • What do three pages of Trump tax returns show us?
    On Saturday night, The New York Times published an analysis of several pages of Donald Trump’s 1995 tax return, where he declared business losses so large he may have avoided paying federal taxes for years. Trump is the first major party presidential candidate in 40 years to refuse to release his tax returns. David Barstow, who co-authored the story, joins Hari Sreenivasan.
    Original Air Date: October 2, 2016

Saturday, October 1, 2016

  • Is Ohio less important in this year's election?
    Ohio has long been known as a bellwether state when it comes to the race for the White House. No Republican has ever won the presidency without winning Ohio and no Democrat since John F. Kennedy has become president without a victory in the state. But this year the stakes may not be as high. Jonathan Martin of The New York Times joins Hari Sreenivasan from Washington, D.C.
    Original Air Date: October 1, 2016
  • Oxford study could point to new treatments for HIV
    This week, Oxford University researchers released a study that may impact treatments for HIV. The study looked at young children in South Africa with HIV and found that 10 percent of them never developed symptoms of AIDS. Philip Goulder, a professor of pediatrics at Oxford University who led the research team, joins Hari Sreenivasan.
    Original Air Date: October 1, 2016
  • Saving treasured art after Italy’s major earthquake
    In August, a 6.2-magnitude earthquake shook central Italy, killing almost 300 people, leaving thousands homeless, and causing an estimated $5 billion in property damage. Today, rescue efforts center on saving the area’s cultural artifacts. NewsHour Special Correspondent Christopher Livesay reports.
    Original Air Date: October 1, 2016

Friday, September 30, 2016

  • Understanding the rise of the Islamic State
    As a young man, Lawrence Wright first visited the Middle East when he taught English in Cairo. He has spent much of his life since reporting on the region -- documenting culture by sharing the stories of individuals. His new book, “The Terror Years,” considers the evolution of extremism and the Islamic State since 9/11. Wright sits down with Jeffrey Brown to discuss.
    Original Air Date: September 30, 2016
  • Trump alleges former Miss Universe starred in sex tape
    On Friday, Donald Trump’s campaigning began long before he reached President Gerald Ford's Michigan tomb, where he was slated to speak. He unleashed a slew of early morning tweets maligning Alicia Machado, a former Miss Universe he had previously mocked for her weight, and alleging she had starred in a sex tape. Hillary Clinton called his online commentary “unhinged.” Hari Sreenivasan reports.
    Original Air Date: September 30, 2016
  • Sex trafficking of African migrants is a ‘modern plague’
    African women seeking a better life in Europe face a long, perilous, often fatal journey across the Mediterranean. But when they do arrive, they confront yet another threatening prospect: conscription into sex slavery. Eighty percent of all Nigerian women who survive the trip to Italy end up coerced into prostitution by “Madams,” who are often former sex slaves themselves. Malcolm Brabant reports.
    Original Air Date: September 30, 2016
  • Could hackers compromise November election results?
    Since the hacking of the Democratic National Committee, there has been growing concern about cyber-manipulation of election results this November. Voter registration databases in Illinois and Arizona were penetrated in June, and the FBI reported this week on attempts against several other states. Hari Sreenivasan talks to chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner for more on the threat.
    Original Air Date: September 30, 2016
  • FAFSA makes changes, hoping more students will utilize funds
    Federal financial aid for college is often underutilized due to the complexity of required paperwork; however, 90% of students who do complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) enroll in school. This year, the FAFSA is being streamlined in the hope of increasing participation. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with Kim Cook, executive director of the National College Access Network.
    Original Air Date: September 30, 2016
  • Shields and Brooks on Trump’s tweets & Clinton's language
    Since Monday night's debate, Donald Trump's taxes and tweets have drawn rapt attention. Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the "bizarreness" of the week's campaign developments, Hillary Clinton’s struggle to win millennial voters back from third-party candidates and the congressional decision to override a presidential veto.
    Original Air Date: September 30, 2016

Thursday, September 29, 2016

  • Helping Afghan women grow financial independence
    In the 15 years since the U.S. went into Afghanistan, $1.5 billion has been spent to develop women’s rights in the country. But even with significant improvements, there remain many hardships, including domestic violence and the lack of educational opportunity. Special correspondent Jennifer Glasse visits a farming project that aims to provide women with the power to make their own decisions.
    Original Air Date: September 29, 2016
  • iO Tillett Wright on finding beauty in our differences
    It’s hard to look someone in the eye and deny their humanity, says iO Tillett Wright. Now Wright has spent the past six years photographing people who identify across the LGBT spectrum. Wright offers a Brief but Spectacular take on finding beauty in difference.
    Original Air Date: September 29, 2016
  • This DJ mixes local music to create a global sound
    Jace Clayton, aka DJ/rupture, spends his time traveling, absorbing music as well as creating it. To create his art, he mixes various melodies and rhythms from all over the world in order to create new, complex sounds. Jeffrey Brown speaks with Clayton about his new book, “Uproot,” in which he chronicles his travels and journey to amplify musical conversations.
    Original Air Date: September 29, 2016
  • Investigating Hoboken’s mystery rush hour train crash
    A rush hour commuter rail train smashed into a station in Hoboken on Thursday, killing one and injuring more than one hundred. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with Brenda Flanagan of NJTV News about the factors that may have led to the accident and upcoming investigations into transit security and safety.
    Original Air Date: September 29, 2016
  • News Wrap: After veto override, Congress considers bill fix
    In our news wrap Thursday, Republican congressional leaders opened the door for changes in a new law allowing the relatives of 9/11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia. White House spokesman John Earnest said Congress may be having buyers remorse after overriding President Obama’s veto of the measure. Also, the U.S. is on the verge of ending its Syrian talks with Russia, due to to the assault on Aleppo.
    Original Air Date: September 29, 2016
  • How the rise of early voting is changing campaign tactics
    November 8 is the big day, but voters are already starting to cast their ballots. When all is said and done, one third of votes will be cast early this election. Lisa Desjardins offers a look at what happened on the campaign trail and Judy Woodruff speaks with Sasha Issenberg of Bloomberg Politics about the ways early voting is changing how campaigns organize.
    Original Air Date: September 29, 2016
  • Why seeing Trump’s tax returns really matters
    Having declined to release his tax returns, Donald Trump made an offhand remark at the first presidential debate that made people wonder if the real estate tycoon pays any tax at all. But that’s just one part of the equation. David Cay Johnston joins economics correspondent Paul Solman to make sense of Trump's taxes and why it matters.
    Original Air Date: September 29, 2016

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