Tuesday, September 20, 2016

  • Marine recruit's death reveals wider issue of abuse, hazing
    Why did a 20-year-old recruit jump to his death at the Marine Corps training facility at Parris Island? That question spurred an internal investigation, which uncovered a larger pattern of hazing and abuse. William Brangham joins Judy Woodruff to offer a closer look at the investigation.
    Original Air Date: September 20, 2016
  • How a Mass. couple saved thousands from Nazi death camps
    It started with a school project: Interview someone with moral courage. For Artemis Joukowsky, it became an enduring project to explore the life of his grandparents, Waitstill and Martha Sharp, who helped more than 2,000 people avoid deportation to Nazi death camps. Judy Woodruff speaks with Joukowsky and Ken Burns, who tell the story of the Sharps in a new documentary.
    Original Air Date: September 20, 2016
  • Dangers of isolationism, Syria top Obama’s last UN address
    President Obama gave his final speech at the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday. He spoke about the “growing contest” between authoritarianism and democracy in the face of terror and the refugee crisis. He appealed to the world to do more for the millions fleeing war-torn countries and joined other leaders calling for a stop to the fighting in Syria. Judy Woodruff reports.
    Original Air Date: September 20, 2016
  • Why first-generation students need mentors who get them
    When Jennine Capó Crucet was a college freshman, her parents stayed for her entire orientation. It wasn’t because they especially wanted to; they just didn’t know what they were meant to do. As a first-generation college student, Crucet was not aware of the norms understood by most of her peers. Now a novelist and professor, she gives her take on what first-generation students need.
    Original Air Date: September 20, 2016
  • Police shooting of Terence Crutcher may test Tulsa tensions
    There are calls for a federal investigation into the police shooting of Terence Crutcher in Tulsa, Oklahoma. After his car stalled, video footage showed Crutcher, an unarmed black man, walking away from police, arms raised, before being shot. Gwen Ifill speaks with Ginnie Graham of Tulsa World about the shooting and the challenges for the city in grappling with issues of race and law enforcement.
    Original Air Date: September 20, 2016

Monday, September 19, 2016

  • Are Clinton and Trump judged by different standards?
    Mirroring their dissimilar campaigns, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump responded very differently to Saturday's bombings, with Clinton emphasizing her experience and Trump focusing on immigration. But even when they're discussing the same issues, are the candidates evaluated according to separate standards? Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report and NPR’s Tamara Keith join Gwen Ifill to discuss.
    Original Air Date: September 19, 2016
  • UN issues unprecedented declaration on refugee crisis
    An estimated 65 million people worldwide are considered refugees and migrants. On Monday, the United Nations General Assembly's began its first summit on the growing global issue. The session yielded an unprecedented declaration of commitment to organization and cooperation in supporting refugees. William Brangham interviews Filippo Grandi, UN High Commissioner for Refugees, about its importance.
    Original Air Date: September 19, 2016
  • The new librarian of Congress on ‘free information’
    The Library of Congress has a new chief: Carla Hayden. Most of her predecessors in the role have come from scholarly institutions, but Hayden is a librarian through and through. She is also the first woman and the first African American to take charge of the nation's oldest and largest collection. Jeffrey Brown speaks with Hayden about the continuing importance of the library in the digital age.
    Original Air Date: September 19, 2016
  • Bombing suspect held; New York security at ‘all-time high’
    Following a shootout, New York police apprehended their suspect for Saturday’s actual and attempted bombings in New York and New Jersey. Twenty-eight-year-old Ahmad Khan Rahami, a naturalized U.S. citizen from Afghanistan, was seized after being recognized sleeping in the doorway of a New Jersey bar. Earlier in the day, a text message alert urged New Yorkers to call 911 if they saw him.
    Original Air Date: September 19, 2016
  • News Wrap: ‘No connection’ between bombings and mall attack
    In our news wrap Monday, President Obama said there’s “no connection” between Saturday’s bombings in New York and New Jersey and the Minnesota mall stabbings, which the Islamic State claimed it inspired. Also, the Syrian military declared a week-long ceasefire over and said fighting will resume; a U.S-Russia pact expired today, although the State Department is working to extend the deal.
    Original Air Date: September 19, 2016
  • Clinton and Trump respond differently to Saturday attacks
    With terrorism suddenly at the forefront of the news, Hillary Clinton campaigned on her national security qualifications, referencing experiences in the Situation Room and dealing with foreign enemies of the U.S. Meanwhile, Donald Trump called into Fox News to suggest that police have been constrained in pursuing suspects because they are under pressure not to profile. John Yang reports.
    Original Air Date: September 19, 2016
  • Is this ‘syndrome’ causing American political dysfunction?
    Has our political system gone crazy? Jonathan Rauch thinks so. In a recent piece for the Atlantic, Rauch explores what he calls “chaos syndrome” in Washington: government stagnation, he argues, is resulting from politicians' inability to compromise, combined with constant calls for transparency. Judy Woodruff speaks with Rauch about the history of American politics and where they stand today.
    Original Air Date: September 19, 2016
  • Can we recognize radicalization before it’s too late?
    The suspect behind this weekend’s bombings has been apprehended; now authorities are trying to figure out what motivated him and whether he acted alone. Judy Woodruff talks to George Washington University’s Lorenzo Vidino and former Department of Homeland Security official Juliette Kayyem about what the investigation has uncovered so far and how we can try to prevent future attacks.
    Original Air Date: September 19, 2016

Sunday, September 18, 2016

  • What caused a gas pipeline leak in Alabama?
    The price of a gallon of gas is expected to go up this week along the East Coast, due to a leaky gas pipeline in Alabama. The pipeline delivers more than a million barrels of gasoline every day from Gulf Coast refineries to states from Mississippi to New Jersey. The Wall Street Journal's Alison Sider joins Alison Stewart to discuss.
    Original Air Date: September 18, 2016
  • Can technology help predict who will attempt suicide?
    Suicide is now the nation's tenth-leading cause of death, and the second-leading cause of death for Americans aged 15-34 years old. Top suicide researchers are developing new technological tools to help predict who is most at risk and save lives. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Alison Stewart reports.
    Original Air Date: September 18, 2016
  • Dutch police use eagles to hunt illegal drones
    Police in the Netherlands are taking a unique approach toward finding illegal, and potentially unsafe, drones. They are the first in the world using eagles to hunt and catch them. The NewsHour Weekend's Christopher Booker has more.
    Original Air Date: September 18, 2016

Saturday, September 17, 2016

  • Russia claims U.S. airstrikes killed Syrian troops
    U.S. military officials said Saturday they halted coalition airstrikes meant for ISIS fighters in Syria after Russia claimed the attacks instead killed more than 62 Syrian troops. The announcement came just days after a ceasefire took effect. Liz Sly of the Washington Post joins Hari Sreenivasan from Beirut via Skype to discuss.
    Original Air Date: September 17, 2016
  • How one step team is helping students graduate
    The documentary "Gentlemen of Vision,” from PBS member station KETC in St. Louis, follows a group of young men who are part of a step program. Its goal: to decrease the dropout rate and encourage students to graduate high school. In this excerpt, we meet a few of the young men who have committed to the discipline of practice and competition.
    Original Air Date: September 17, 2016
  • Can a Silicon Valley start-up transform education?
    A for-profit school system called AltSchool now operates in San Francisco and New York, with plans to license its program to public schools across the country. AltSchool's co-founder, a former Google executive, believes methods used in the tech industry, like collecting data from users, can transform education. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Joanne Jennings reports from San Francisco.
    Original Air Date: September 17, 2016

Friday, September 16, 2016

  • Trump ends one Obama ‘birther’ rumor by starting another
    After years of stoking the so-called “birther” controversy, Donald Trump finally acknowledged that President Obama is a natural-born U.S. citizen. But then Trump falsely accused Hillary Clinton of starting the rumors about Obama’s birthplace. Clinton and members of the Congressional Black Caucus attacked Trump for disrespecting the president. Lisa Desjardins reports.
    Original Air Date: September 16, 2016
  • Can Trump gain with Ohio Democrats on economic issues?
    Trumbull is one of Ohio’s most reliably Democratic counties. But Republican nominee Donald Trump has paid special attention to the region and voters have listened to his message about the economy. John Yang speaks with some voters who see the New York millionaire as someone who can improve prospects for working class Americans.
    Original Air Date: September 16, 2016
  • What it’s like to be a black cop in 2016: ‘I see both sides’
    Damon Gilbert is a black police officer in one of the most violent cities in the country. He describes his experience on the force in Oakland, California, as well as how he’s dealt with the police as a private citizen. Gilbert offers his Brief but Spectacular take on what it means to be a cop in 2016.
    Original Air Date: September 16, 2016
  • Shields and Brooks on Trump’s ‘birther’ lie
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s news, including Donald Trump’s admittance -- after five years of sowing doubt -- that President Obama is a natural-born citizen, plus Hillary Clinton’s characterization of some Trump supporters as “deplorables” and the tightening national polls.
    Original Air Date: September 16, 2016
  • Why high-tech boot camps are appealing to students, lenders
    To get a job with a good salary, having a college degree is increasingly vital. But degrees are also more and more expensive, and don’t guarantee job placement. Skills-based boot camps may provide one solution, by teaching valuable skills in a short period of time. And support for computer coding camps is flourishing, both from private investors and the government. Hari Sreenivasan reports.
    Original Air Date: September 16, 2016
  • Tribes across North America converge at Standing Rock
    Protestors of the North Dakota pipeline celebrated after the Department of Justice temporarily halted the project in federal jurisdictions last Friday. But while some equipment sits idle, construction in other areas continues. William Brangham visits the Standing Rock Reservation, where more than 100 Native American tribes have gathered, to recap a week of protests.
    Original Air Date: September 16, 2016

Thursday, September 15, 2016

  • Giving students a leg up with job skills a resume won’t show
    When applying to a job out of college, having a top-notch resume isn’t enough anymore. College graduates from top schools apply alongside dozens of similarly qualified candidates. In light of new hiring trends, a program at Georgetown University aims to make their students the best candidates possible, by teaching them skills that will give them a leg up on the job hunt. Hari Sreenivasan reports.
    Original Air Date: September 15, 2016
  • Clinton: Time away helped her ‘reconnect’ to run
    Hillary Clinton is back on the campaign trail after a bout of pneumonia. On Wednesday, she released a letter from her doctor that said she is “fit to serve” as president. On Thursday, Donald Trump released his medical records from his longtime doctor, saying that he is healthy. Meanwhile, a new poll from CBS and The New York Times suggests that the race continues to tighten. Gwen Ifill reports.
    Original Air Date: September 15, 2016
  • News Wrap: UN criticizes humanitarian aid delays to Syria
    In our news wrap Thursday, the U.N. blamed Syrian President Bashar al-Assad for delays in getting humanitarian aid into his country despite the cease-fire. The U.N. wants to deliver convoys into Aleppo, but says Syria is not providing permits. Also, a self-described hit man in the Philippines says that President Rodrigo Duterte ordered killings by death squads when he was mayor of Davao.
    Original Air Date: September 15, 2016

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