Friday, January 20, 2017

  • Women’s March leaders aim for ‘solidarity against misogyny’
    On Saturday, another crowd will gather on the National Mall -- not to celebrate, but to advocate. William Brangham talks with Bob Bland and Carmen Perez, co-chairs of the Women's March On Washington, about the organization’s mission to protect women’s rights, creating a safe space for difficult conversations on sensitive issues and remembering that “we’re all people first.”
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2017
  • The Obama White House, from the man behind the lens
    For the past eight years, Pete Souza has visually chronicled the Obama era. He was in the situation room when U.S. special forces killed Osama Bin Laden in 2011 and at the prayer service for victims of the Newtown, Connecticut, school shooting. John Yang sits down with Souza to discuss the “little unexpected gems” that became iconic moments and the constant character of the president he saw.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2017
  • Trump offers vision for his presidency: ‘only America first’
    Donald Trump started his day with a tweet, declaring, "the work begins!" It was Inauguration Day in Washington, where despite traditions of democracy and civility, political divisions were still on display. Judy Woodruff and William Brangham offer a look at the day’s events, and John Yang weighs in on his view of the inauguration.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2017
  • Anti-Trump protests break out across D.C.
    While many people ventured to the National Mall on Friday to cheer the new president, other groups were not so celebratory. Protests erupted across Washington, D.C., as opponents of President Trump expressed their disapproval, sometimes clashing chaotically with police and leaving damage in their wake. Jeffrey Brown reports.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2017
  • On the Mall, Trump supporters exult, ‘We’re here!’
    Turnout may have been lower this Inauguration Day than the previous two, but attendees who did make the trip to the National Mall exhibited no shortage of enthusiasm. Lisa Desjardins speaks with out-of-town visitors hopeful that President Trump will usher in a resurgence of manufacturing jobs, stronger support for the military and an ability to overcome political gridlock, among other change.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2017
  • News Wrap: Senate confirms Mattis, Kelly
    In our news wrap Friday, Congress signed off on the first of President Trump's picks to fill out his cabinet, nearly unanimously voting to approve Defense Secretary James Mattis and Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly. Also, Mexican drug lord "El Chapo" Guzman pleaded not guilty to federal drug trafficking charges in New York after being extradited Thursday.
    Original Air Date: January 20, 2017

Thursday, January 19, 2017

  • Trump’s National Security transition is off to a rocky start
    A day before inauguration, the incoming Trump administration was forced to defend the pace of its staffing for important national security and diplomatic jobs. Judy Woodruff talks with Roger Cressey, a former National Security Council staff member, and Mark Landler of The New York Times about the factors behind the upheaval and what it says about the incoming administration and its challenges.
    Original Air Date: January 19, 2017
  • The hidden insecurity of older middle-class Americans
    Elizabeth White has been on the edge of the financial cliff for years, but you'd never know it from outside appearances. "Everybody is pretending," she says. In her self-published book "Fifty-Five, Unemployed, and Faking Normal" she painfully chronicles the crash of a flourishing career and upper-middle class lifestyle -- and she's not alone. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports.
    Original Air Date: January 19, 2017
  • How Josh Earnest made sure he knew what Obama was thinking
    Josh Earnest, White House press secretary since 2014, was there when Barack Obama was running for president, and he'll be there when the lights go out on the Obama White House. As he prepares to leave the podium, Earnest sits down with John Yang to discuss the role of being the gatekeeper between the press and the president.
    Original Air Date: January 19, 2017
  • Jim Jarmusch's new film asks where poetry comes from
    As movies seem to keep getting bigger and louder, filmmaker Jim Jarmusch still sets his own pace. In his latest, a bus driver makes his daily route through the streets of Paterson, New Jersey, taking in the stuff of everyday life to write poems. Jeffrey Brown talks with Jarmusch and poet Ron Padgett, who composed poems for the film.
    Original Air Date: January 19, 2017
  • Mnuchin defends record; Perry says his attitude has changed
    In another day of contentious confirmation hearings, the most dogged questioning came for Treasury Secretary nominee Steven Mnuchin, a billionaire banker who worked at Goldman Sachs owned a hedge fund. Meanwhile, former Texas Gov. Rick Perry, nominee for energy secretary, walked back comments he had made about abolishing the Energy Department. Lisa Desjardins talks with Judy Woodruff.
    Original Air Date: January 19, 2017
  • Reports of transition delays as Trump readies to take office
    President-elect Donald Trump arrived in Washington a day before he will take the oath of office. But there were reports that the national security transition had been slow because of delays by the Trump Team. Meanwhile, incoming White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer criticized Senate Democrats for slowing Cabinet confirmations. John Yang reports.
    Original Air Date: January 19, 2017
  • Why we need to ask questions now about our high-tech future
    Your phone probably knows more about the intimate details of your life you than your lover, says futurist Amy Webb. And you better get used to it -- we'll be spending the rest of our lifetimes in a world shaped by artificial intelligence. Webb gives her Brief But Spectacular take on the future.
    Original Air Date: January 19, 2017

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

  • Reassessing the value of care for chronic health conditions
    Surgeon Atul Gawande says we need to reconsider health care’s focus on generously rewarding physicians who practice heroic interventions, rather than those who practice incremental medicine for chronic conditions. Gawande talks with William Brangham about the value of that kind of care, and the potential effects of a Republican repeal of the Affordable Care Act.
    Original Air Date: January 18, 2017
  • At final White House press conference, Obama looks ahead
    In two days his time in the Oval Office will be over. President Obama on Wednesday held his final news conference before the White House Press Corps, defending his decision to commute Chelsea Manning’s prison sentence and looking back at how the nation has changed. But most of the time was spent looking ahead at political challenges and his own role in politics going forward. John Yang reports.
    Original Air Date: January 18, 2017
  • News Wrap: Global temperatures hit record high in 2016
    In our news wrap Wednesday, data from NASA, NOAA and others show that 2016 was the hottest year since records have been kept, making it the third record-breaking year in a row. Also, South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, nominee to be the next U.N. ambassador, said in her confirmation hearing that Russia committed war crimes in Syria and cannot be trusted.
    Original Air Date: January 18, 2017
  • Where things stand for Trump’s Cabinet amid hard questioning
    Several of President-elect Donald Trump's Cabinet nominees have faced tough questioning. At Rep. Tom Price's hearing, the spotlight fell on the fate of the Affordable Care Act and his own history. Lisa Desjardins and Jeffrey Brown report on the scrutiny placed on Price, EPA nominee Scott Pruitt and Education Secretary nominee Betsy DeVos by the Senate.
    Original Air Date: January 18, 2017
  • Is fusion energy possible in our lifetime?
    Limitless power with virtually no greenhouse gases or radioactive waste. If that sounds too good to be true, that's because it is. For decades, researchers have looked for ways to control, confine and sustain fusion as an energy source. But there has been a lot of progress on a small scale, building on years of physics understanding and progress. Science correspondent Miles O’Brien reports.
    Original Air Date: January 18, 2017
  • The towering challenge of protecting the Trumps in New York
    When Donald Trump moves into the White House, Trump Tower will still be a home of the first family. Securing the skyscraper presents unprecedented challenges, not to mention traffic gridlock, a hardship on nearby businesses and a fight over who should be paying the sky-high costs. The NewsHour’s Rhana Natour reports.
    Original Air Date: January 18, 2017

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

  • What will be Obama’s legacy on race?
    What did the election of America’s first black president mean for the United States? And how did President Obama’s policies and rhetoric advance issues important to the black community? Rael Nelson James of the Bridgespan Group, James Peterson of Lehigh University and Sherrilyn Ifill of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund join Judy Woodruff to discuss the impact of the Obama years.
    Original Air Date: January 17, 2017
  • Ambassador Power warns against historical amnesia on Russia
    Outgoing U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Samantha Power used her final speech to focus on Russia as a major threat. Judy Woodruff sits down with Power during her last days in office to discuss troubling actions by Russia and the future of Russian relations under the Trump administration, as well as the Obama administration’s complicated decision not to intervene militarily in Syria.
    Original Air Date: January 17, 2017
  • What will DeVos’ focus on choice mean for public education?
    Education secretary nominee Betsy DeVos has neither taught nor worked in a school system, but she and her family have used wealth and influence to create more charter schools and champion vouchers. As educators watch her hearing for an understanding of her views, William Brangham talks to Frederick Hess of American Enterprise Institute and Randi Weingarten of American Federation of Teachers.
    Original Air Date: January 17, 2017
  • Half of all health costs is spent on a fraction of patients
    Health care “super-utilizers” make up just 5 percent of the U.S. population but they account for 50 percent of health care spending. As health care costs continue to rise, providers are trying to figure out how to find these patients and get to the root of their problems. But the looming repeal of the Affordable Care Act may disrupt those efforts. Special correspondent Sarah Varney reports.
    Original Air Date: January 17, 2017

Monday, January 16, 2017

  • Political, legal opposition adds obstacles to Brexit
    The mechanics of executing Brexit, the move to get Britain out the of European Union, are causing tensions inside the British government, and with opponents who would like to stop it from happening at all. Special correspondent Jennifer Glasse reports.
    Original Air Date: January 16, 2017
  • Why students from for-profit schools are left in debt limbo
    Students who attend for-profit college and training programs are more likely to borrow, borrow more and struggle to repay their loans. Not only that, but the overall graduation rate at for-profit institutions is just 27 percent. Meanwhile, a number of schools have shuttered, leaving former attendees with debt and no way to pay it back. Special correspondent Lizzie O’Leary reports.
    Original Air Date: January 16, 2017
  • Don't wait till your dying words to say what's important
    "Should I plan out my last words?" As a hospice chaplain, Kerry Egan hears that question sometimes. But death isn't so easy to predict. Instead, Egan suggests making sure you ask forgiveness or share your wisdom now.
    Original Air Date: January 16, 2017
  • Why is Trump criticizing key allies to U.S. security?
    European officials are digesting new comments by President-elect Trump, who told two newspapers that NATO is obsolete, suggested the U.S. might drop sanctions on Russia and said he is indifferent about the future of the EU. John Yang gets reaction from Heather Conley of the Center for Strategic and International Studies and Nicholas Burns, the former U.S. ambassador to NATO.
    Original Air Date: January 16, 2017
  • This inauguration, usually time for unity, defies precedent
    Tamara Keith of NPR and Susan Page of USA Today join Judy Woodruff to discuss what to expect from Donald Trump’s inauguration, a war of words between the president-elect and civil rights legend Rep. John Lewis, a growing inauguration boycott by Democrats and pushback by the African American community and Mr. Trump’s pledge for health care coverage for everyone.
    Original Air Date: January 16, 2017

VIDEO SEARCH