Tuesday, August 15, 2006

  • Archbishop Discusses Church Stance on Immigration
    The first in a series on immigration in the United States features Archbishop Charles Chaput of Denver, who is conducting a series of townhall meetings in northern Colorado to explain the Church's position on immigration.
    Original Air Date: August 15, 2006

Friday, June 23, 2006

  • The Jobless Recovery
    In 2003, business and economics correspondent Paul Solman took a closer look at the blue collar job loss of the recession and the difficulty former manufacturing workers have finding new work.
    Original Air Date: June 23, 2003
    June 23, 2003

Friday, May 12, 2006

  • Shields and Brooks on NSA Collecting Calls
    In May 2006, USA Today reported that the NSA, under then-CIA Nominee Gen. Michael Hayden's leadership, had, since 9/11, secretly collected tens of millions of phone call records from the nation's three largest telephone companies -- Verizon, AT&T and BellSouth. On May 12, 2006, Ray Suarez held this conversation with syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks.
    Original Air Date: May 12, 2006
  • NSA Collecting Calls: Is this Program Legal?
    In May 2006, USA Today reported that the National Security Agency, under then-CIA Nominee Gen. Michael Hayden's leadership, had, since 9/11, secretly collected tens of millions of phone call records from the nation's three largest telephone companies -- Verizon, AT&T and BellSouth. Jeffrey Brown held this conversation on May 12, 2006 about the government's alleged data collection program.
    Original Air Date: May 12, 2006

Wednesday, February 8, 2006

  • New Orleans Health Care Struggles After Hurricane Katrina
    Months after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and its health system, local residents lined up at a health fair at the zoo, where doctors treated them for everything from diabetes to heart disease. Susan Dentzer reports.
    Original Air Date: February 8, 2006

Thursday, October 13, 2005

  • Intellectual Piracy in China
    Intellectual property theft is a crime in the United States, but usually ignored in China, NewsHour economics and business correspondent Paul Solman discovered on his trip to China in 2005.
    Original Air Date: October 13, 2005
    October 13, 2005

Tuesday, October 11, 2005

  • Misinvestment in China
    Business and economics correspondent Paul Solman looks at why China's economy was lagging behind those of its East Asian neighbors and asks whether the government was making unjustified investment decisions.
    Original Air Date: October 11, 2005
    October 11, 2005

Wednesday, August 17, 2005

  • The Nation's Navasky on Opinion Journalism
    Victor Navasky, editor of The Nation, discusses his new book, "A Matter of Opinion" and the role of opinion journals in the media.
    Original Air Date: August 17, 2005

Wednesday, June 15, 2005

  • Raising Tax Cap Explored as Way to Close Social Security Gap
    How can Social Security continue to be funded? Paul Solman explores American sentiment toward raising the income cap at which workers stop paying Social Security taxes.
    Original Air Date: June 15, 2005

Tuesday, May 10, 2005

  • How Your Brain Makes Economic Decisions
    Paul Solman investigates what really goes on in our heads when we make economic decisions. Researchers are beginning to understand how the pre-frontal cortex, or more often our "lizard brain," drives our decisions in the stock market.
    Original Air Date: May 10, 2005

Thursday, April 21, 2005

  • Former Gangster Tells His Story of Reform
    In the second of a two-part series on how families are faring in the era of welfare reform, business correspondent Paul Solman of WGBH-Boston looks at the role of fathers and one man's success story.
    Original Air Date: April 21, 2005

Wednesday, March 23, 2005

  • Rethinking Benefit Calculation Could Aid Social Security
    Business correspondent Paul Solman of WGBH-Boston examines the debate surrounding changing Social Security, including the pros and cons of reducing retirement benefits by tying them to cost-of-living increases rather than wage increases, in this second part of a two-part series.
    Original Air Date: March 23, 2005

Tuesday, March 22, 2005

  • Rethinking the Retirement Age
    Business correspondent Paul Solman of WGBH-Boston examines the debate surrounding changing Social Security, particularly raising the retirement age.
    Original Air Date: March 22, 2005

Monday, February 14, 2005

  • The Fate of Families After Welfare
    A report by Paul Solman of WGBH-Boston about families, especially single mothers, trying to get off welfare and into the work force in part one of a two-part series.
    Original Air Date: February 14, 2005

Wednesday, May 26, 2004

  • Magicicada: Scientists Study Swarming Cicadas
    The largest group of periodical cicadas -- called Brood X -- emerged this month after 17 years underground. Jeffrey Brown investigates the biology and culture of these cyclical insects.
    Original Air Date: May 26, 2004

Wednesday, November 27, 2002

  • Conversation: Chicago's 1995 Heat Wave
    Ray Suarez talks with author Eric Klinenberg about his book on the 1995 heat wave.
    Original Air Date: November 27, 2002

Friday, September 6, 2002

  • Poetry: 'The Names'
    Billy Collins was the U.S. poet laureate at the time of the 9/11 attacks. A year later, he wrote "The Names" in honor of the victims. He read the poem before a special joint session of Congress held in New York City in 2002, and reads it again now.
    Original Air Date: October 28, 2008
    October 28, 2008

Thursday, July 4, 2002

  • Robert Pinsky Reads John Hollander's 'Sparklers' for July 4
    On the July 4, 2002 NewsHour With Jim Lehrer, former poet laureate Robert Pinsky read aloud John Hollander's poem "Sparklers" in front of Boston's Charles River. Pinsky said the poem "celebrates fireworks on a grand scale, on a national scale, and also by the end of the poem on an intimate scale."
    Original Air Date: July 4, 2002

Wednesday, July 18, 2001

  • Cuba and U.S. Relations: Blaming the Blockade
    In 2001, NewsHour economics correspondent Paul Solman traveled to Cuba to look at the effect of the embargo on Cuban society and U.S. relations.
    Original Air Date: July 18, 2001

Tuesday, July 17, 2001

  • Capitalism in Cuba
    PBS NewsHour economics correspondent Paul Solman traveled to Cuba in 2001 to report on the economy's early flirtations with capitalism.
    Original Air Date: July 17, 2001
    July 17, 2001

Wednesday, July 4, 2001

  • Robert Pinsky Reads Walt Whitman for the 4th of July
    On the July 4, 2001 NewsHour With Jim Lehrer, former poet laureate Robert Pinsky read aloud the concluding section of Walt Whitman's "By Blue Ontario's Shore," Pinsky said, "Whitman's list of what he 'will not shirk' remains an attractive agenda and can inspire a credible patriotism." Here, for the 4th of July, are Walt Whitman's lines:
    Original Air Date: July 4, 2001

Friday, June 25, 1999

  • Xenical: A Dieter's Dream?
    A new diet drug was recently approved by the Federal Drug Administration and analysts are expecting it to be a big success. Health Correspondent Susan Dentzer reports on Xenical.
    Original Air Date: June 25, 1999

Thursday, May 6, 1999

  • 1999: Picking Up the Pieces in Oklahoma
    Residents of Oklahoma and Kansas are returning to the places where they once had homes following a May 3, 1999, tornado. Betty Ann Bowser follows two households as they pick through the damage and try to reconstruct their lives in this report from May 6, 1999.
    Original Air Date: May 6, 1999

Tuesday, June 17, 1997

  • Spirit of a Nation
    NewsHour correspondent Paul Solman speaks with veteran Time Magazine art critic Robert Hughes.
    Original Air Date: June 17, 1997
    June 17, 1997

Friday, May 23, 1997

  • What's New and Unusual in Art?
    Business and economics correspondent Paul Solman tells the stories of the Whitney Museum's Biennial exhibits in 1997.
    Original Air Date: May 23, 1997

Wednesday, August 14, 1996

  • Storied Journalist Richard Ben Cramer
    Probably the most important defining moment in Bob Dole's life happened over fifty years ago on a battlefield in Italy. Dole biographer, Richard Ben Cramer, paints an emotional picture of the courageous actions that reveal much about the character of the GOP presidential hopeful.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 1996

Wednesday, December 27, 1995

Tuesday, October 29, 1991

  • Xerox: Strength in diversity
    Business and economics correspondent Paul Solman profiles Xerox's efforts to increase the share of African Americans among their upper ranks for the MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 1991
    October 29, 1991
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